gregkh's blog

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kdbus details

Now that linux.conf.au is over, there has been a bunch of information running around about the status of kdbus and the integration of it with systemd. So, here’s a short summary of what’s going on at the moment.

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binary blobs to C structures

Sometimes you don’t have access to vim’s wonderful xxd tool, and you need to use it to generate some .c code based on a binary file. This happened to me recently when packaging up the EFI signing tools for Gentoo. Adding a build requirement of vim for a single autogenerated file was not an option for some users, so I created a perl version of the xxd -i command line tool.

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booting a self-signed Linux kernel

Now that The Linux Foundation is a member of the UEFI.org group, I’ve been working on the procedures for how to boot a self-signed Linux kernel on a platform so that you do not have to rely on any external signing authority.

After digging through the documentation out there, it turns out to be relatively simple in the end, so here’s a recipe for how I did this, and how you can duplicate it yourself on your own machine.

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Longterm kernel 3.10

As I’ve discussed in the past, I will be selecting one “longterm stable” kernel release every year, and maintain that kernel release for at least two years.

Despite the fact that the 3.10-stable kernel releases are not slowing down at all, and there are plenty of pending patches already lined up for the next few releases, I figured it was a good time to let everyone know now that I’m picking the 3.10 kernel release as the next longterm kernel, so they can start planning things around it if needed.

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3.10 Linux Kernel Development Rate

While working on the latest statistics for the yearly Linux Foundation “Who Writes Linux” paper, I noticed the rate-of-change for the 3.10 kernel release that just happened this weekend:

Every year I think we can’t go faster, and every year I’m wrong.

Note, the “number of employers” row is not correct, I haven’t updated those numbers yet, that takes a lot more work, which I will be doing this week.

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Hardware, past, present, and future.

Here’s some thoughts about some hardware I was going to use, hardware I use daily, and hardware I’ll probably use someday in the future.

Thunderbolt is dead, long live Thunderbolt.

Seriously, it’s dead, use it as a video interconnect and don’t worry about anything else.

Ok, some more explanation is probably in order…

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How to create a sysfs file correctly

One common Linux kernel driver issue that I see all the time is a driver author attempting to create a sysfs file in their code by doing something like:

gregkh's picture

Hardware, past, present, and future.

Here's some thoughts about some hardware I was going to use, hardware I use daily, and hardware I'll probably use someday in the future.

Thunderbolt is dead, long live Thunderbolt.

Seriously, it's dead, use it as a video interconnect and don't worry about anything else.

Ok, some more explanation is probably in order...

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Updated history of the 2.6.16-stable kernel

A few years ago, I gave a history of the 2.6.32 stable kernel, and mentioned the previous stable kernels as well. I'd like to apologize for not acknowledging the work of Adrian Bunk in maintaining the 2.6.16 stable kernel for 2 years after I gave up on it, allowing it to be used by many people for a very long time.

I've updated the previous post with this information in it at the bottom, for the archives. Again, many apologies, I never meant to ignore the work of this developer.

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Linux 3.8 is NOT a longterm kernel

I said this last week on Google+ when I was at a conference, and needed to get it out there quickly, but as I keep getting emails and other queries about this, I might as make it "official" here. For no other reason that it provides a single place for me to point people at.

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