gregkh's blog

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Stable kernel release candidates

I thought it would be easier to do a round of stable kernel releases in the middle of the larger kernel merge window, to prevent the next round from being so big (given that there are a lot of patches usually applying during the -rc1 merge window cycle).

So, I've now done:

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Stable kernel tree status, January 9, 2012

As 3.2 is now out, here's a note as to the current status of the different stable/longterm kernel trees.

First off, please everyone remember to mark any patch that you want to have applied to the stable kernel trees with a simple:

Cc: stable

marking in the Signed-off-by: area. Once the patch hits Linus's tree, I will automatically be notified of it and it will be applied if possible. If it does not applied, you will be notified of that.

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Future of the -longterm kernel releases.

tl;dr; -stable kernel releases stay the same this proposal is how we pick the -longterm releases -longterm kernels will be picked every year, and maintained for 2 years before being dropped. the same Documentation/stablekernelrules.txt will apply for -longterm kernels, as before. History:

2.6.16 became a "longterm" kernel because my day job (at SUSE) picked the 2.6.16 kernel for its "enterprise" release and it made things a lot easier for me to keep working at applying bugfixes and other stable patches to it to mak

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How to piss off a Linux kernel subsystem maintainer - part 6

Sixth in a long series of complaints... See part 1 and part 2 and part 3 and part 4 and part 5 for previous atrocities.

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Two lazyweb requests

I have a python script that I run all the time as part of my process for emailing out "your patch has been accepted" messages when I accept a Linux kernel patch into one of the many different development trees I maintain. This script's goal is to merely determine the character encoding that the email needs to be sent in, either "UTF-8" or "ISO-8859-1" or "ANSI_X3.4-1968". It's really simple which is great, but it is slow when fed a file of any real length.

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Help me come up with good questions for Linus at LinuxCon Japan 2011

My previous plea for help worked out very well. The resulting video of the talk can be seen here, with one of the highlights being the phrase, "It is cheaper to work upstream in the kernel" from Dirk Hohndel who works at Intel. There's a summary of the talk on lwn.net over here if you don't want to sit through the whole video.

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openSUSE Tumbleweed status for the week of April 22, 2011

Here's a short note as to the status of some recent activity in the openSUSE:Tumbleweed repo:

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openSUSE Tumbleweed status for the week of April 9, 2011

Here's a short note as to the status of some recent activity in the openSUSE:Tumbleweed repo:

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Android kernel wakelock solution

In two separate email threads this week, I have been asked about the status of the Android wakelock issue that has been described in the past. It turns out that people don't realize that the Linux kernel now supports this type of locking, and has for a few releases now.

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