jzemlin's blog

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Microsoft to Mobile Customers: Choice is a Bad Thing (and Linux will Lose)

Last week, David Coursey reported that Microsoft entertainment and devices boss Robbie Bach made the prediction in an analyst briefing that Linux on mobile will lose. Why? It’s choice is a bad thing for customers and that there is too much Linux in the mobile marketplace

By Bach’s count there are 17 variants of Linux available on mobile phones. He sees this as a bad thing for customers. We, unsurprisingly, see this as a bad thing for Microsoft.

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Protecting Linux from Microsoft (Yes, Microsoft Got Caught)

Earlier this week, the Wall Street Journal’s Nick Wingfield broke a story on Microsoft selling a group of patents to a third party. The end result of this story is good for Linux, even though it doesn’t placate fears of ongoing attacks by Microsoft.

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The Perils of Linux Maturity: Torvalds Fakes Emerge in Twittersphere

Rolex, movies, Gucci, and even Sharpie pens, among other consumer goods, are well known for reaching a level of ubiquity where people start producing fakes or knock-offs. From our industry, even Steve Jobs’ personal brand warranted a knock-off in the form the FakeSteveJobs blog. Linux, too, has reached that level of ubiquity and maturity. We all use Linux every day via our bank ATMs, our cars, our netbooks, the Internet (Google, Facebook and more), and the list goes on.

Thus, the Linus Torvalds knock-offs have naturally come forth.

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I Was at the First LinuxCon

People often say things like this as a badge of honor. Some of us even keep event badges hung from our office doors as a tally of the events we’ve attended.

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Enterprise IT Hits Bottom - Open Source Holds an Intervention

Sometimes you need to hit rock bottom before you can get the help you need. IDC acted as an “interventionist” today publishing a new report showing how open source is growing in the down economy.

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Linux Paves Way for New “Open Source in America” Coalition

Linux has a strong history of deployments in government agencies around the globe and has helped drive the adoption of open source applications in government in recent years. But, we have a long, winding road in front of us. Research firm Gartner predicts that only 25% of government vertical, domain-specific applications will either be open source or contain software developed by a community by 2011.

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Linux the Clear Winner in Google OS News

Most of you have seen the news today from Google formally announcing their Chrome Operating System for netbooks using Intel x86 and ARM chips. The is painted as a classic “clash of the titans” between Google and Microsoft, with Google finally directly assaulting Microsoft’s top cash business.

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LinuxCon Keynote Speaker Bob Sutor Sits Down for Open Voices Podcast Interview

One of the coolest things I get to do in this job is talk to the developers and business executives who are every day advancing the Linux operating system. Our Open Voices Podcast Series showcases some of the most influential people in the Linux and open source software community, including Linus Torvalds, Mark Shuttleworth, Mitchell Baker, and many more.

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The Week of the Linux Desktop

We don’t need to declare the year of the Linux desktop anymore. This week alone was pretty darn good. Having spent the week at Computex, the place where you see all the things that people are going to find in Bestbuy and Amazon 6 months from now, it is clear that Linux has a critical role in client computing. Here is a shortlist of this weeks developments.

Moblin Breaks Out

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Call it Netbook, Smartbook, or “Low-cost small notebook PC” - It is Great for Linux

You say potato I say; are we really talking about this? At Computex this week we saw two new computing “categories” created. It has long been marketing 101 in the high tech world to try and define a category of computing based on metrics that favor your own particular market position of unique feature set. That is what is going on today in the great netbook/smartbook/low-cost small notebook PC debate. Let’s look at each of these and try and sort this out.

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