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Swift: The Easy Scripting Language for Parallel Computing

Over the next decade, computer scientists anticipate the world’s largest supercomputers will grow to millions of cores running as many as a billion parallel threads. Even personal devices will contain a hundred cores and perform thousands of concurrent tasks.

Such systems with the ability to run multiple parts of the same program at the same time –  in parallel – on a massive scale will be necessary to solve complex problems like climate change and drug modeling as well as to crunch the exabytes of data our smart devices will collectively produce.

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The People Who Support Linux: 19-Year-Old Aims to be a Kernel Developer

Kieran Grant works in IT support for a financial services company but unabashedly aspires to be a Linux SysAdmin and, someday, a kernel developer. After using and hacking Linux for five years, the 19-year-old from Logan City in Queensland, Australia is well on his way to achieving that goal.

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Tulsa’s Community Collaboration Model for Supercomputing

Two weeks ago the Tandy Supercomputing Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma launched as the home to one of the country’s first shared, publicly available supercomputers.

The project -- born of a collaboration between The University of Tulsa, Oklahoma State University, The University of Oklahoma, Tulsa Community College, the city of Tulsa, business owners and nonprofit foundations --  gives community members equal access to a $3.5 million, 100-node supercomputing system at a fraction of the cost to build their own.

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U-Boot Creator Wolfgang Denk on the Great Achievements of Embedded Linux

Embedded Linux can claim at least two great achievements in standardization in the past few years, according to Wolfgang Denk, managing director of DENX Software Engineering and creator of U-Boot, the open source universal boot loader for embedded devices. First, developers were not completely disrupted with the introduction of ARM systems.

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The People Who Support Linux: Giving a Public System a Web Interface Lift

As an IT manager for the Mt. Lebanon Municipality near Pittsburgh, PA, Nick Schalles recently faced a familiar but difficult problem for those maintaining public infrastructure.  How could they update an old system to meet the new demands of the digital age and stay within a public agency budget?

“Basically everything we have at work is custom built. All of our software was coded on an IBM mainframe years ago,” Schalles said via email.   

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You’re Invited to Contribute to the Future of Linux.com

With nearly 1 million  visitors a month, we aim to make Linux.com a hub of information for the Linux community and a platform for advocacy for the Linux operating system. Thank you to our readers and community members for your ongoing support of this important resource.

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Linux Thermal Daemon Monitors and Controls Temperature in Tablets, Laptops

Intel’s Open Source Technology Center has released an open source tool to monitor and control temperature in tablets, ultrabooks and laptops. The Linux Thermal Daemon can use the latest thermal drivers in the Linux kernel, not just the standard cpufreq subsystem, to provide CPU temperature control.  

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LinkSmart’s Low-Cost, Big Data Plan with Linux and MapR

LinkSmart’s audience and link management platform for publishers was built with big data at its core. So when management decided to migrate the cloud-based application to their own hardware, there was no question it would be completely powered by Linux. 

Linux-based infrastructure allows the 3-year-old startup to cut costs, both by avoiding the licensing fees of proprietary systems and by tapping the community’s collective knowledge base instead of paying for expensive support contracts, said CTO Manny Puentes.

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Is the Instrument Panel the Next Target for Open Source Software in Cars?

The In-Vehicle Infotainment (IVI) System has received much of the focus from open source software initiatives in the automotive industry so far with the Automotive Grade Linux working group and the GENIVI alliance. But the instrument panel, which shares many technologies with IVI, is also ripe for development with Linux.

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5 Reasons Infotainment is the First Target for Open Source Software in Cars

The In-Vehicle-Infotainment (IVI) System is the most complex electronic system in the car.  It collects data from all of the car’s sensors and integrates functions as diverse as navigation, climate control, media playback, cellphone connectivity and more.

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