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Brandon Philips: How the CoreOS Linux Distro Uses Cgroups

CoreOS is a new Linux distribution for servers aimed at giving all data centers the same automation capabilities and efficiencies as those seen in the massive server farms run by Google or Facebook. Their technology, combined with the upstart package manager Docker, is popularizing the idea that the Linux operating system itself can serve as a hypervisor. Lending credibility to the approach is Linux kernel developer Greg Kroah-Hartman, a CoreOS advisor.

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Linux Kernel 3.11 Release Boosts Performance, Efficiency

Linus Torvalds released the 3.11 “Linux for workgroups” kernel on Monday with many new features and fixes that improve performance and lower power consumption. Changes are also in keeping with recent industry trends toward the energy-efficient ARM architecture and the use of solid state drives (SSD).

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Inside LinuxCon and CloudOpen 2013, Part Two: More Co-Located Events

We have less than two weeks until LinuxCon and CloudOpen in New Orleans and I can hardly wait. There are a ton of great keynotes, breakout sessions, mini-summits, workshops and parties to choose from. Have you planned your schedule yet?

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Inside LinuxCon and CloudOpen 2013: Xen, OpenDaylight and Tizen Summits

Along with a great line up of keynote speakers and breakout sessions, LinuxCon and CloudOpen offer a dizzying array of workshops, mini-summits and work sessions this year. How will you make the most of your time in the Big Easy?

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IBM's Arvind Krishna: Linux Will Fuel Next-Gen Cloud Applications

The next generation of applications will be smarter -- with built-in data, mobile and social capabilities -- and it will be built on private clouds that run on Linux servers, says Arvind Krishna, general manager of development and manufacturing in the Systems & Technology Group at IBM. What's still unclear, however, is the business model for delivering these future applications, he says.

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Slideshow: Best LinuxCon Goose Chase Contest Photos (So Far)

The Great LinuxCon Wild Goose Chase scavenger hunt is well underway as Linux community members across the globe race for the chance to win up to $500. Participants complete missions by sending in their photos through the GooseChase app, and we've gotten hundreds of photos so far.

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With Android Poised for Embedded Boom, Developer Training is Needed

The use of Android in embedded devices is heating up and along with that comes demand for developers skilled in embedded Android, say analysts and service providers within the embedded industry.

The impending demand isn’t immediately obvious; beyond smartphones and tablets, few products running embedded Android can be found on the market today. The automotive industry, where Android has been a staple of in-vehicle-infotainment systems, has so far seen the most prolific use. But that’s about to change.

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HP's Brian Aker: Open Cloud Gains Importance Post-PRISM

Since the National Security Agency's PRISM surveillence program was leaked to the press in June, the public and corporate backlash has some analysts estimating billions of dollars in losses for the IT services industry. In this context, developing an open source alternative to commercial cloud platforms becomes even more important, argues Brian Aker, a fellow in the HP cloud services division. 

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All About the Linux Kernel: Cgroup’s Redesign

Over the past few months, big changes have been underway on the cgroup Linux kernel subsystem and its related, but independent, system and service manager Systemd. Developers aren’t building shiny new features, though, as much as overhauling cgroups (control groups) to impose more structure in an area of the kernel that’s become problematic.

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The People Who Support Linux: Attorney Uses Linux to Aid Firm’s Data Analysis

Employment attorney Ahmed Minhaj first started using Linux back in 2001 because he appreciated the philosophy behind Linux and other open source projects. He was also looking for an alternative to the buggy and unstable Microsoft Windows and MS Office.

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