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mwoster's picture

Collaborative Projects: Transforming the Way Software is Built

I got involved with Linux and open source in the mid-90s. I had a routine: I would check out LKML, go to bed  and wake up in the morning and find thousands of messages from developers around the world innovating and iterating at an unprecedented rate of change. Nothing had or has since compared with that rate of innovation: I was hooked on open source collaboration, and I’ve never looked back.

libbyclark's picture

Wargaming Mobilizes with Linux and Open Source

Online game developer and publisher Wargaming relies on Linux and open source software to produce and distribute its line of popular military strategy games, says Maksim Melnikau, a solution architect at War

gregkh's picture

3.10 Linux Kernel Development Rate

While working on the latest statistics for the yearly Linux Foundation “Who Writes Linux” paper, I noticed the rate-of-change for the 3.10 kernel release that just happened this weekend:

Every year I think we can’t go faster, and every year I’m wrong.

Note, the “number of employers” row is not correct, I haven’t updated those numbers yet, that takes a lot more work, which I will be doing this week.

gregkh's picture

Hardware, past, present, and future.

Here’s some thoughts about some hardware I was going to use, hardware I use daily, and hardware I’ll probably use someday in the future.

Thunderbolt is dead, long live Thunderbolt.

Seriously, it’s dead, use it as a video interconnect and don’t worry about anything else.

Ok, some more explanation is probably in order…

gregkh's picture

How to create a sysfs file correctly

One common Linux kernel driver issue that I see all the time is a driver author attempting to create a sysfs file in their code by doing something like:

libbyclark's picture

Swift: The Easy Scripting Language for Parallel Computing

Over the next decade, computer scientists anticipate the world’s largest supercomputers will grow to millions of cores running as many as a billion parallel threads. Even personal devices will contain a hundred cores and perform thousands of concurrent tasks.

Such systems with the ability to run multiple parts of the same program at the same time –  in parallel – on a massive scale will be necessary to solve complex problems like climate change and drug modeling as well as to crunch the exabytes of data our smart devices will collectively produce.

gregkh's picture

Hardware, past, present, and future.

Here's some thoughts about some hardware I was going to use, hardware I use daily, and hardware I'll probably use someday in the future.

Thunderbolt is dead, long live Thunderbolt.

Seriously, it's dead, use it as a video interconnect and don't worry about anything else.

Ok, some more explanation is probably in order...

libbyclark's picture

The People Who Support Linux: 19-Year-Old Aims to be a Kernel Developer

Kieran Grant works in IT support for a financial services company but unabashedly aspires to be a Linux SysAdmin and, someday, a kernel developer. After using and hacking Linux for five years, the 19-year-old from Logan City in Queensland, Australia is well on his way to achieving that goal.

jennifercloer's picture

The People Who Support Linux: You

If you talk to the Fortune 500 companies, they will tell you Linux is running everything. The operating system has become so dominant over the last decade that it's become the fabric of computing across geographies, markets and industries.

amcpherson's picture

New Linux Training Courses Address OpenStack, Enterprise Automation Needs

It's graduation season and every day there are articles about the shortage of computer scientists. This includes a shortage of entry-level engineers, but also experienced SysAdmins, IT Architects and DevOps professionals in the enterprise IT market, especially as the market is undergoing a shift to cloud and highly automated IT environments.

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