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amcpherson's picture

Miss our Collaboration or Legal Summits? Here are some resources

Last week, we had our biggest turn-out ever for our Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit and our Legal Summit held immediately before. Collab has come a long way since the first meeting in 2007 at the Googleplex. While some of the issues and players have changed at heart the result is the same: a cross-section of people from the industry and community who may otherwise not meet collaborating together.

libbyclark's picture

Exclusive: Zipwhip to open source ‘Textspresso’ machine and release cloud texting for Ubuntu

It’s a pretty nice dream. On your morning commute, you send a text message to the office espresso machine with your order for a double Americano and the warm mug is waiting when you get in.

For Seattle-based cloud texting company Zipwhip, the dream is reality. Its engineers custom-built an espresso machine that takes orders via SMS using their own cloud messaging application. (Watch the video, it’s pretty sweet.)

rstreif's picture

Five ways to rev up Linux for the car industry

Linux is already being adopted by an increasing number of car makers such as GM and Jaguar predominantly for in-vehicle infotainment systems.
jennifercloer's picture

That's a Wrap: 2012 Linux Foundation Collab Summit Pictures

{lfnews}The day after one of The Linux Foundation events is always a bit like the day after a really great party: you're exhausted but in a good way.

libbyclark's picture

Five favorite Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit sessions

As the annual Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit was wrapping up yesterday in San Francisco, we asked a few attendees to weigh in on their favorite sessions.

The invitation-only event brought together 430 Linux kernel developers, Linux Foundation members and other Linux community insiders for keynote talks, work sessions, training, project updates, industry trends and networking.

amcpherson's picture

Announcing New Open Compliance Template

Almost two years ago, The Linux Foundation launched the Open Compliance Program to help companies manage their end-to-end open source license compliance processes.  We have continually added papers, training, tutorials, and dedicated Legal/Compliance session tracks at conferences like Collaboration Summit to help make compliance processes easier to understand, and more cost-effective to implement.

Today, we are releasing a new template that will help companies manage the flow of data through the compliance process. 

jennifercloer's picture

Slideshow: Live from Collaboration Summit

{lfnews}The morning keynote presenters were super insightful here at The Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit. Useful ideas were shared that will be topics of further collaboration over the next couple of days. OpenMAMA, Open Compute, Tizen and Linux kernel development were among the topics discussed today. Here's a short slideshow with some great pictures of our speakers.


libbyclark's picture

Facebook’s Open Compute Project Seeks New Ideas for Efficient Datacenters

When a Facebook user ‘likes’ something, adds a friend or uploads a photo gallery, he doesn’t necessarily think of what goes on at the back end. That ever-mounting pile of information collected each second from millions of users presents a significant challenge to efficient data storage and management - not to mention a potentially daunting financial and environmental cost.

amcpherson's picture

How is Linux Built? Our new report and video.

When you work for the Linux Foundation you get a lot of questions on just how Linux is built. Given the massive scale of the development and ubiquity of Linux today, some of us in the community might think everyone understands how the largest collaborative project in computing works. How you submit a patch. How maintainers work with Linux creator Linus Torvalds. But because of Linux's unprecedented growth in mobile, embedded and cloud computing, among other areas, new companies and developers are looking to participate. More than ever before, actually.

jzemlin's picture

What Red Hat Has Done is Worth So Much More Than a Billion

Red Hat is widely expected to crack a billion dollars in revenue in today’s earning call. This achievement will finally put to bed the argument that "nobody can make money with open source." I want to congratulate Red Hat for this incredible achievement. However, I would also like to use this occasion to show that there is significantly more at play here. It isn't just the billion dollars Red Hat is making with open source; there are many more reasons why Linux and open source are fundamental building blocks of the future:

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