jzemlin's picture

Just before the holidays, we announced a new open source effort to advance blockchain technology for a distributed ledger that could be used across industries. Blockchain is about harnessing one of the core technologies behind Bitcoin, but developed in an organized, collaborative environment and optimized for myriad use cases. In the quiet depth of late December, we received more than 3,000 inquiries in response to this news.

ratliff's picture

One of the best practices for secure development is dynamic analysis. Among the various dynamic analysis techniques, fuzzing has been highly popular since its invention and a multitude of fuzzing tools of varying sophistication have been developed.

pdesautels's picture

CES is arguably the biggest tech unveiling of the year and I always look forward to attending to get a feel for where the industry thinks the market is heading. As an attendee, if you look through the glitz, hype and products, you can see into the Matrix and spot the trends that flow through it. My focus this year was 100 percent on the Internet of Things. Specifically, I was on the hunt for evidence that the mainstream of companies building connected products are moving beyond Nikola Tesla’s 1898 model of “teleautomaton” (aka the remote control) to something bigger, better and far more powerful…

hkirksey's picture

Networking is set to be one of the biggest growth industries for open source software development this year, and a key part of that is Network Functions Virtualization (NFV). Set to transform the way networks  are designed, NFV—an initiative to move to the cloud network services that have traditionally been carried out by proprietary, dedicated hardware—has seen explosive growth over the past few years, and that trajectory has only just begun. In fact, analyst firm Infonetics forecasts a fivefold increase in the NFV/SDN (Software-Defined Networking) market by 2019 with more than $11 billion in revenue. That’s huge.

dcauchy's picture

The hottest up-and-coming auto show may very well be CES. Many of the world’s biggest automakers will be there, and they’ll be showing off more than new electric or self-driving cars. The technology inside our cars for music, infotainment, and GPS is also a big part of story. Especially with consumers expecting their “connected” car experience to be as glitzy, convenient, simple and easy to upgrade as their smart phone or wearable.

libbyclark's picture

Autodesk, a design and fabrication software company best known for AutoCAD, has more than 150 specialized programs for visual effects, BIM (Building Information Modeling), simulation, 3D printing and subtractive manufacturing.

Visitor's picture

This season’s spirit of giving fits right in with the Linux and open source philosophy. The idea of building software by letting anyone contribute to it and use it is now so widespread that it’s easy to forget how pioneering it once was. But, through this innovative style of collaboration, the Linux operating system has become the most widely used software in the world. Giving back to the community is what open source is all about.

amcpherson's picture

 

Can the principles and practices of Linux be transferred to other industries? We at The Linux Foundation certainly think so and apparently so does the industry. Over the last few years every major technology category has been taken over by open source. Many of those Foundations and projects are being hosted at The Linux Foundation or at other organizations like the Apache Software Foundation and others. Much opinion has been written about the proliferation of open source projects, but not about the value.

kstewart's picture

“Almost always, great new ideas don't emerge from within a single person or function, but at the intersection of functions or people that have never met before.”  -- Clayton M. Christensen

amanda's picture

The Linux Foundation is no stranger to the world of open source and free software -- after all, we are the home of Linux, the world’s most successful free software project. Throughout the Foundation’s history, we have worked not only to promote open-source software, but to spread the collaborative DNA of Linux to new fields in hopes to enable innovation and access for all.

Corbet's picture

Every year, the Linux Kernel Summit brings together about 100 core kernel developers and subsystem maintainers to discuss issues of importance to the development community as a whole.  The 2014 Summit, held August 18-20 in Chicago (just before LinuxCon North America) covered a wide range of topics and made a number of decisions.  But there is one outcome from this event that merits especially wide attention: the development community is getting better at what it does.