jennifercloer's picture

Hey, can I follow you? Out of context that sounds pretty creepy. But in a world with Linux and the Internet infrastructure it enables with services like Facebook, Twitter, Netflix and Amazon, we know exactly what that means.

amcpherson's picture


Can the principles and practices of Linux be transferred to other industries? We at The Linux Foundation certainly think so and apparently so does the industry. Over the last few years every major technology category has been taken over by open source. Many of those Foundations and projects are being hosted at The Linux Foundation or at other organizations like the Apache Software Foundation and others. Much opinion has been written about the proliferation of open source projects, but not about the value.

kstewart's picture

“Almost always, great new ideas don't emerge from within a single person or function, but at the intersection of functions or people that have never met before.”  -- Clayton M. Christensen

amanda's picture

The Linux Foundation is no stranger to the world of open source and free software -- after all, we are the home of Linux, the world’s most successful free software project. Throughout the Foundation’s history, we have worked not only to promote open-source software, but to spread the collaborative DNA of Linux to new fields in hopes to enable innovation and access for all.

Corbet's picture

Every year, the Linux Kernel Summit brings together about 100 core kernel developers and subsystem maintainers to discuss issues of importance to the development community as a whole.  The 2014 Summit, held August 18-20 in Chicago (just before LinuxCon North America) covered a wide range of topics and made a number of decisions.  But there is one outcome from this event that merits especially wide attention: the development community is getting better at what it does.