Free Resource: How to Give a Great Tech Talk Tutorial at CollabSummit

amcpherson's picture

As the head curator for content at Linux Foundation events, I work with over 500 speakers a year on technical talks. Universally the people chosen to speak at our events have amazing technical knowledge. They know their stuff. But the actual skill in speaking, delivering an engaging and hopefully entertaining talk to an audience, is sometimes harder to come by. 

Josh BerkusWe are partnering with Josh Berkus to offer a free resource to help tech experts become better speakers. Josh will be giving a tutorial at our CollaborationSummit next month entitled "How to Give a Great Tech Talk." If you haven't seen Josh speak, you can view a very engaging and entertaining, tongue-in-cheek talk on how to prevent community he gave at CollabSummit in 2010 here. He knows how to get your attention so he can make his point. 

If you are a tech speaker who wants to improve his or her skills, we hope you can attend this tutorial. Please request an invite and let me know you'd like to attend this talk. If you can't attend, never fear. We are video taping it and will make it available on the Linux.com video forum and will encourage speakers accepted to speak at LinuxCons and other events to view it. We want our content to be the best technical information as well as engaging to our audiences, so we reach our goal of having the best tech conferences in the industry. 

More information on the session below. You can request an invite here

I hope to see many of you at CollabSummit next month! 

Give a Great Tech Talk
======================

Summary
-------

"How was the presentation?"
"It was ... um, OK. Kind of interesting."

Don't let the above be your talk!  There's a lot more to doing a
good talk than just knowing the code you're presenting.  Join this
tutorial to learn how to transform "um, OK" to "great!"

Description
-----------

They wrote the code.  It's an interesting project.  They have plenty of
slides.  So why is the audience all doing their email?

You've seen that speaker.  Maybe you've been that speaker.  But it
doesn't have to be that way, and this tutorial can help.

Presenting is a skill nobody is born with, but anyone can learn. The way
to become a better presenter is through training, science, and practice.
 In this audience-participation tutorial, veteran conference presenter
Josh Berkus will go over his tech talk advice in detail in order to help
you improve your presentation skills, including:

    Know your audience
    How to prepare for a talk
    Nobody cares about your slides
    … but make good ones anyway
    The 7 Habits of Highly Ineffective Speakers
    Clock-watching
    Audience interaction 101
    When your demo crashes
    The audience outside the lecture hall
    Common presentation issues and tips

If you have never attended a speaker training before, this tutorial will
show you how much better your talks could be.  And if you have attended
one before, you might pick up a few tips and ideas.

Biography
=========

Josh Berkus is a database geek, best known for his work on the
PostgreSQL project, but also does Python, Perl, C, Linux, fundraising,
pottery and cooking. He speaks about databases, software development and
open source at ten to fifteen conferences a year.  Josh works for
PostgreSQL Experts, Inc.

Part 1:

Part 2: