News - May 2013

Bloomberg Businessweek: Behind the ‘Internet of Things’ Is Android—and It’s Everywhere

Ken Oyadomari’s work space at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, Calif., looks like a triage tent for smartphones. Parts from dozens of disassembled devices are strewn on workbenches. A small team of young engineers picks through the electronic carnage, carefully extracting playing card-size motherboards—the microprocessing heart of most computers—that will be repurposed as the brains of spacecraft no bigger than a softball. Satellites usually cost millions of dollars to build and launch. The price of Oyadomari’s nanosats, as they’ve become known, is around $15,000 and dropping.

PCWorld: Considering a Linux career? Four tips for new college grads

'Tis the season for college graduations, and that means there are countless fresh grads out there looking for their first real, professional jobs.

Read more at PCWorld.

Investor's Business Daily: SDN Rises As Technology Companies Join Forces

Software-defined networking could become the next big tech trend — or  not.

ZDNet: To the space station and beyond with Linux

Unlike my recent spoof story about a Linux-powered Iron Man suit that you could build at home, this story isn't science fiction. NASA really has decided to drop Windows from the laptops on the International Space Station (ISS) in favor of Linux, and the first humanoid robot in space, R2, really is powered by Linux. 

Read more at ZDNet.

How Linux Conquered the Fortune 500

In 1999, Bill Gates famously wrote off Linux -- free, collaboratively written software -- as a threat to Windows only in the relatively tiny "student and hobbyist market." But by last year Microsoft itself had become one of the top 20 corporate contributors to Linux, writing code to make sure its products work well with the ubiquitous software -- a sign of just how thoroughly Linux has conquered the enterprise.

Read more at CNN Money.

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