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The Register: Linux Foundation says many Linux admins and engineers are certifiable

LinuxCon 2014 The Linux Foundation on Wednesday introduced two new certification programs aimed at connecting employers with qualified Linux administrators and engineers.

"The supply of labor has been far outpaced by the demand for Linux," said Linux Foundation executive director Jim Zemlin, addressing the audience at the annual LinuxCon conference in Chicago. "Linux is growing faster than any platform in the history of computing – has been for many, many years – and the supply of labor just isn't keeping up with it."

Network World: Linux Foundation to offer new certification for IT workers

With an eye toward deepening the global Linux talent pool, the Linux Foundation today announced that it will offer two new certifications for engineers and administrators.

The Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator, or LFCS, and the Linux Foundation Certified Engineer, or LFCE certificates will be granted to applicants who pass an automated online exam. The cost will be $300, although the foundation will hand out 1,000 free passes to attendees at LinuxCon, where the announcement was made.

eWeek: Linux Foundation Debuts Linux Certification Effort

CHICAGO—The Linux Foundation announced today its first Linux certifications for IT professionals. The new certifications were announced at the LinuxCon conference here, which officially gets under way today. The two new designations are the Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS) and Linux Foundation Certified Engineer (LFCE). The new certifications mark the first time the Linux Foundation itself has offered formal certification.

Datamation: What the Linux Foundation Does for Linux

CHICAGO - Jim Zemlin, the executive director of the Linux Foundation, talks about Linux a lot. During his keynote at the LinuxCon USA event here, Zemlin noted that it's often difficult for him to come up with new material for talking about the state of Linux at this point.

Every year at LinuxCon, Zemlin delivers his State of Linux address, but this time he took a different approach. Zemlin detailed what he actually does and how the Linux Foundation works to advance the state of Linux.

GeekWire: Know your Linux! New Linux Foundation certification aims to boost Linux job market

Linux has been expanding its reach — powering Google, Facebook and other major platforms — and hiring managers say they’re in need of an increasing number of Linux developers. But many of those jobs are going unfilled, and given the entrenched position of Microsoft Windows inside many companies, not as many developers and admins are getting Linux training and certification as Linux leaders would like.

The VAR Guy: Linux Foundation Opens 2014 Scholarship Program for Open Source Training

The Linux Foundation is once again this year sponsoring scholarships for students and young professionals interested in open source software development through theLinux Training Scholarship Program, which is now accepting applications.

IT World: The Linux Foundation's free Introduction to Linux class starts today

Linux has opened a world of career possibilities to many people over the years. If you're interested in learning about Linux or you know someone who wants to learn about it, then there's still time to take a free class. The Linux Foundation's course "Introduction to Linux" starts today, and you can still register for it. The course usually costs $2400 but it's free on the edX site.

The VAR Guy: Linux Foundation, edX Offering 'Intro to Linux' MOOC

In just a few days, anyone will be able to take the Linux Foundation's "Introduction to Linux" course—which previously cost $2,400—for free over the Internet.

eWeek: From Clouds to Cars to Kitchens, Linux Making an Impact Everywhere

There's no operating system more ubiquitous than Linux. It's everywhere. It's even running in devices and computers you may not suspect—our cars, our cell phones, even our refrigerators. Linux supports businesses and organizations everywhere, and because it underpins open-source innovation, it is the platform of choice for new applications. Companies such as IBM and their work with organizations like the OpenPOWER Foundation are creating such new innovations as Big Blue's new scale-out servers running Linux and putting them in places all around us.

Ad Age: Can Linux Speed In-Car Systems?

The open-source software revolution is coming to the car.

Most in-vehicle infotainment systems sold today use proprietary software, with the underlying code tightly controlled by automakers and by a few major software providers, such as Microsoft Corp. and Ottawa-based QNX Software Systems.

Read more at Ad Age

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