News

Wall Street Journal: IBM Again Pledges $1 Billion to a Linux Effort

Linux continues to dominate data centers. IBM wants more of that action to take place on its hardware.

The computer giant on Tuesday plans to pledge that it will spend $1 billion over four or five years on Linux and related open-source technologies for use on its Power line of server systems, which is based on the internally developed chip technology of the same name.

Ars Technica: Google and Samsung soar into list of top 10 Linux contributors

Google and Samsung have become increasingly frequent contributors to Linux, and each is now among the top 10 companies sponsoring the open source kernel that powers operating systems from mobile devices to desktops and servers.

LinuxPlanet: LinuxCon 2013 Preview

This week the LinuxPlanet congregates at the LinuxCon conference in New Orleans and once again it looks to be a memorable event.

BizBash: Lessons From Linux: How to Foster Collaboration at Meetings and Conferences

The computer operating system Linux powers 98 percent of the world’s supercomputers, most of the servers that keep the Internet humming, and tens of millions of Android mobile phones and gadgets. As an open-source system, Linux relies on the collaboration of programmers around the world.

Computerworld UK: A New Chapter for Open Source

Back in April, I wrote about in interesting new venture from the Linux Foundation called the OpenDaylight Project. As I pointed out then, what made this significant was that it showed how the Linux Foundation was beginning to move beyond its historical origins of supporting the Linux ecosystem, towards the broader application of the important lessons it has learnt about open source collaboration in the process.

TheScientist: Data Sharing Goes Linux

The Biological Expression Language (BEL) may be on the road to becoming a ubiquitous mode of communication among life scientists. OpenBEL, the open-source software project that seeks to transform life science data into something akin to HTML coding language, has partnered with The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit technology consortium that promotes the growth and development of the open-source operating system Linux.

TechWeek Europe: Linux Foundation Backs Life Sciences Computing Language

The Linux Foundation is growing its roster of collaboration projects by expanding from the physica

VentureBeat: Linux Foundation throws its weight behind open science

The Linux Foundation, champion of all things open-source, has just announced a new collaboration with OpenBEL, an open-source platform for sharing scientific data.

OpenBEL was, until about a year ago, a proprietary project. The foundation, which has huge amounts of experience in creating, guiding, and maintaining open-source software, intends to help OpenBEL with adoption and collaboration in its own community.

eWeek: Linux Foundation Collaboration Gets Biological

Can the development model that is used to build Linux be extended for the life sciences? A new collaborative project will aim to answer that question.

The Linux Foundation is growing its roster of collaboration projects by expanding from the physical into the biological realm with the OpenBEL (Biological Expression Language). The Linux Foundation, best known as the organization that helps bring Linux vendors and developers together, is also growing its expertise as a facilitator for collaborative development projects. 

BioIT World: OpenBEL Joins Linux Foundation as Collaborative Project

OpenBEL—the open source version of the Biological Expression Language released last June by Selventa (see, “Ring My BEL”)—announced today that it is now an open source collaborative project of The Linux Foundation. 
 
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