News

PCWorld: Considering a Linux career? Four tips for new college grads

'Tis the season for college graduations, and that means there are countless fresh grads out there looking for their first real, professional jobs.

Read more at PCWorld.

Investor's Business Daily: SDN Rises As Technology Companies Join Forces

Software-defined networking could become the next big tech trend — or  not.

ZDNet: To the space station and beyond with Linux

Unlike my recent spoof story about a Linux-powered Iron Man suit that you could build at home, this story isn't science fiction. NASA really has decided to drop Windows from the laptops on the International Space Station (ISS) in favor of Linux, and the first humanoid robot in space, R2, really is powered by Linux. 

Read more at ZDNet.

How Linux Conquered the Fortune 500

In 1999, Bill Gates famously wrote off Linux -- free, collaboratively written software -- as a threat to Windows only in the relatively tiny "student and hobbyist market." But by last year Microsoft itself had become one of the top 20 corporate contributors to Linux, writing code to make sure its products work well with the ubiquitous software -- a sign of just how thoroughly Linux has conquered the enterprise.

Read more at CNN Money.

Ars Technica: Linux Foundation takes over Xen, enlists Amazon in war to rule the cloud

The Linux Foundation has taken control of the open source Xen virtualization platform and enlisted a dozen industry giants in a quest to be the leading software for building cloud networks.

 

ZDNet: Xen becomes a Linux Foundation project

Xen, Citrix's popular open-source hypervisor, is becoming a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project with the backing of such major technology powers such as Amazon Web Services, Google, and Intel.

 

TechCrunch: Xen Moving To The Linux Foundation

The Xen project celebrates its 10th anniversary this week. It’s also moving to a new home at The Linux Foundation as a Collaborative Project.  Just like the Linux kernel, Xen enjoys contributions from a variety of different companies, so a vendor-neutral organization to host development and collaboration is a big win for the project.

Read more at TechCrunch.

ComputerworldUK: OpenDaylight and the Future of Enterprise Software

Earlier this week, the Linux Foundation made an announcement about the oddly-named OpenDaylight project:

 

ZDNet: The Linux Foundation unifies Software-Defined Networking powers

These companies are taking on a monster of a job. The problem isn't so much the standards or the code, it's getting everyone on the same page. The mere fact that The Linux Foundation has brought together essentially all the major players in the SDN space and has gotten them to agree to work on a common, open framework is remarkable in its own right. If they're successful in actually creating the OpenDaylight framework, SDN will be one giant step closer to becoming the new datacenter and corporate networking standard.

New York Times: The OpenDaylight Project Is Open Source Networking

Now, this is news: A bunch of big and powerful companies may have something in their common interest that also benefits their customers.

The Linux Foundation, which has managed the creation of that popular computer operating system, is working with a number of large technology companies to develop an open source project around software-defined networking.

Read more at NYT.com

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