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eWeek: Linux Foundation Debuts Linux Certification Effort

CHICAGO—The Linux Foundation announced today its first Linux certifications for IT professionals. The new certifications were announced at the LinuxCon conference here, which officially gets under way today. The two new designations are the Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator (LFCS) and Linux Foundation Certified Engineer (LFCE). The new certifications mark the first time the Linux Foundation itself has offered formal certification.

The VAR Guy: Linux Foundation Opens 2014 Scholarship Program for Open Source Training

The Linux Foundation is once again this year sponsoring scholarships for students and young professionals interested in open source software development through theLinux Training Scholarship Program, which is now accepting applications.

IT World: The Linux Foundation's free Introduction to Linux class starts today

Linux has opened a world of career possibilities to many people over the years. If you're interested in learning about Linux or you know someone who wants to learn about it, then there's still time to take a free class. The Linux Foundation's course "Introduction to Linux" starts today, and you can still register for it. The course usually costs $2400 but it's free on the edX site.

The VAR Guy: Linux Foundation, edX Offering 'Intro to Linux' MOOC

In just a few days, anyone will be able to take the Linux Foundation's "Introduction to Linux" course—which previously cost $2,400—for free over the Internet.

eWeek: From Clouds to Cars to Kitchens, Linux Making an Impact Everywhere

There's no operating system more ubiquitous than Linux. It's everywhere. It's even running in devices and computers you may not suspect—our cars, our cell phones, even our refrigerators. Linux supports businesses and organizations everywhere, and because it underpins open-source innovation, it is the platform of choice for new applications. Companies such as IBM and their work with organizations like the OpenPOWER Foundation are creating such new innovations as Big Blue's new scale-out servers running Linux and putting them in places all around us.

Ad Age: Can Linux Speed In-Car Systems?

The open-source software revolution is coming to the car.

Most in-vehicle infotainment systems sold today use proprietary software, with the underlying code tightly controlled by automakers and by a few major software providers, such as Microsoft Corp. and Ottawa-based QNX Software Systems.

Read more at Ad Age

PC Advisor: Linux for cars: Automotive Grade Linux rivals CarPlay and Android Auto

Car tech is exploding right now: Apple and Google are getting in on a game that Microsoft has tried to conquer for a while: infotainment systems. Now, there's another player - Automotive Grade Linux (AGL).

Wired: If You ‘Boy Band’ An Open Source Project, Will People Use It?

Most open source software projects come to life because someone is trying to scratch an itch.

IT World: Superclass: 14 of the world’s best living programmers

Linus Torvalds

Main claim to fame: Creator of Linux

Tech Radar: Will your next car run Linux? Cars go open-source with Automotive Grade Linux

In-car tech has just gone open source with news of a new automotive-grade build of the Linux operating system. But what does this mean for your next car?

Linux in various forms is already widely used in cars. But to date, it's largely been used in embedded systems, the operations of which are mostly obscured from owners and drivers.

Read more at Tech Radar

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