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The Verge: One standard to sync them all: AllSeen Alliance forms to accelerate Internet of Things adoption

Eighteen months ago, Qualcomm SVP Rob Chandhok succinctly explained why the internet of things was failing. Instead of working together, manufacturers designed their smart televisions and appliances to only communicate with their own proprietary applications. Instead of building an ecosystem of devices that could talk to one another, they only built for themselves.

Forbes: AllSeen Alliance: Manufacturers Cooperate To Kickstart The Internet Of Things?

Huge business opportunities—if they can pull it off.

The Internet of everything has a new would-be sheriff. And his name is Greg Burns (pictured), chair of the AllSeen Alliance. Run by the Linux Foundation, the group aims to knock together the heads of all the makers of devices that want to talk to each other, and sort out a way for themall to do it

Read more at Forbes

VentureBeat: The Internet of things is coming on faster than ever, thanks to a new, huge alliance

Qualcomm, LG, the Linux Foundation, and a whole team of heavy-hitters in the Internet of things world are coming together and forming an alliance.

Thrilling Star Wars terminology aside, the AllSeen Alliance, as it’s called, will take on the monumental, innovation-accelerating task of creating and maintaining unified standards for device-to-device communication.

Read more at VentureBeat

GigaOm: The AllSeen Alliance launches as a standard for the internet of things

Qualcomm has signed over the source code for its AllJoyn protocol to the Linux Foundation to create a new standard for the internet of things. Meet the AllSeen Alliance, 23 companies that have pledged to use the code underlying Qualcomm’s AllJoyn protocol to build products that will not only be able to talk to each other but offer a more automated programming environment for the devices in your life.

eWeek: Linux Foundation, Panasonic, Qualcomm Form AllSeen Alliance

The Linux Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the growth of Linux and collaborative development, announced the formation of the AllSeen Alliance, a consortium dedicated to advancing adoption and innovation in the "Internet of Everything" in homes and industry.

Read more at eWeek

Engadget: LG, Sharp, Qualcomm and others team up to make your house even smarter

In the rush to connect our personal devices, manufacturers have often launched products and platforms that run completely independently of the gadgets we already own. In an effort to break down those barriers and encourage innovation in connected homes, some of the biggest names in electronics have banded together to form the AllSeen Alliance.

Wall Street Journal: Internet of Things Fans Form ‘AllSeen’ Alliance

How are things going to find each other once they are all connected? A lot of companies are discussing such questions these days, with some of them banding together in an effort that will exploit technology from Qualcomm.

The Linux Foundation, a non-profit group that oversees development of operating system and other projects, on Tuesday is announcing a group called the AllSeen Alliance to help enable a technology trend called the Internet of Things (or, more inclusively, the Internet of Everything).

Computerworld: Home appliance makers connect with open source 'Internet of things' project

Home appliances, cars and computers could soon be talking to one another thanks to an open source framework that has the backing of consumer electronics manufacturers in a new industry alliance.

The AllSeen Alliance is supported by the Linux Foundation. Its members include Cisco, D-Link, Haier, LG Electronics, Qualcomm, Panasonic and Sharp.

TechWeekEurope: Valve Joins Linux Foundation Ahead Of SteamOS Launch

Software and video game developer Valve has joined the Linux Foundation ahead of the launch of its Linux-based operating system SteamOS,

Forbes: Valve Has Joined The Linux Foundation

Valve’s love affair with open-source operating system Linux has been steadily growing throughout 2013. In February, Valve released its Steam platform for Linux. In May, it released some of its most popular games for the platform.

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