Linux Fellow Program

The Linux Foundation has established the Linux Foundation Fellowship Fund to provide financial support to software developers working on Linux and open source community projects. Under the auspices of this fund, the Linux Foundation works with users, vendors and developers to identify where and how additional work or resources could accelerate development efforts and spur the adoption of Linux and open source software.

The Linux Foundation board of directors, with input from the Technical Advisory Board (TAB), will evaluate applications for fellowship funding and determine allocation priorities and levels of financial commitment.

Current Individual Fellowship Recipients

Fellows

 


 

 

Linus Torvalds
Linus Torvalds
Fellow

Linus Torvalds created the Linux kernel and oversaw open source development of the widely-used Linux operating system.

Torvalds was born on December 28, 1969 in Helsinki, Finland. Torvalds enrolled at the University of Helsinki in 1988, graduating with a master's degree in computer science. His M.Sc. thesis was titled Linux: A Portable Operating System.

An avid computer programmer, Linus authored many gaming applications in his early years. After purchasing a personal computer with an Intel 386 CPU, he began using Minix, an Unix-inspired operating system created by Andrew Tanenbaum for use as a teaching tool. Torvalds started work on a new kernel, later to be named "Linux", in the fall of 1991 and after forming a team of volunteers to work on this new kernel, released V1.0 in the spring of 1994.

In 1996, Torvalds accepted an invitation to visit the California headquarters of Transmeta, a start-up company in the first stages of designing an energy saving central processing unit (CPU). Torvalds then accepted a position at Transmeta and moved to California with his family. Along with his work for Transmeta, Torvalds continued to oversee kernel development for Linux.

In 2003, Torvalds left Transmeta to focus exclusively on the Linux kernel, backed by the Open Source Development Labs (OSDL), a consortium formed by high-tech companies, which included IBM, Hewlett-Packard, Intel, AMD, RedHat, Novell and many others. The purpose of the consortium was to promote Linux development. OSDL merged with The Free Standards Group in January 2007 to become The Linux Foundation. Torvalds remains the ultimate authority on what new code is incorporated into the standard Linux kernel.

 


 

 

Greg Kroah-Hartman
Greg Kroah-Hartman
Fellow

Kroah-Hartman is among a distinguished group of software developers that maintain Linux at the kernel level. In his role as Linux Foundation Fellow, KroahHartman will continue his work as the maintainer for the Linux stable kernel branch and a variety of subsystems while working in a fully neutral environment. He will also work more closely with Linux Foundation members, workgroups, Labs projects (http://www.linuxfoundation.org/labs), and staff on key initiatives to advance Linux.

Kroah-Hartman created and maintains the Linux Driver Project. He is also currently the maintainer for the Linux stable kernel branch and a variety of different subsystems that include USB, staging, driver core, tty, and sysfs, among others. Most recently, he was a Fellow at SUSE. Kroah-Hartman is an adviser to Oregon State University’s Open Source Lab, a member of The Linux Foundation's Technical Advisory Board, has delivered a variety of keynote addresses at developer and industry events, and has authored two books covering Linux device drivers and Linux kernel development

 


 

Till Kamppeter
Fellow

Till Kamppeter holds a PhD in Theoretical Physics and works with printing under Linux and Unix already since mid 2000 when he got invited to work as a developer at MandrakeSoft (now Mandriva) in Paris. There he did the packaging of the printing-related software for the distribution and since 2001 he was the leader of the linuxprinting.org project. He was also participating in the work of the OpenPrinting workgroup. Mid 2006 he got invited to work for the Free Standards Group (now The Linux Foundation) merging linuxprinting.org into OpenPrinting and leading the OpenPrinting project full-time.

During all the time from mid 2000 to now Kamppeter has given several printing-related talks and tutorials on conferences, organized booths on Linux shows, and wrote articles in magazines about Linux. From 2006 on he is organizing an annual three-day OpenPrinting Summit, currently together with the annual Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit. With OpenPrinting he leads the development of new printing architectures and technologies and printing infrastructure and interface standards for Linux and Unix-style operating systems. For this he is in contact with the leading printer manufacturers, all relevant free software projects, and the distribution vendors.

 


 

Richard Purdie
Richard Purdie
Fellow

Richard is a developer and maintainer of the OpenEmbedded software project, and architect and maintainer of the Yocto Project and Poky Build System. Most recently he was an Embedded Linux Architect for Intel's Open Source Technology Center. From 2005 to 2008, he was a Software Engineer at OpenedHand, where he worked with a variety of other open source projects such as Clutter, X server, Zaurus and Oprofile. He has also made numerous contributions to the Linux kernel, including as maintainer of the backlight and LED subsystems. Purdie received his MSci in Physics from University of Durham in 2003.

 


 

Janina Sajka
Janina Sajka
Fellow

Janina is the Executive Chair of the Accessibility workgroup.