Developers, vendors, enterprise end-users and enthusiasts of Hyperledger blockchain technologies to converge in Basel, Switzerland

SAN FRANCISCO, January 23, 2018 – Hyperledger, an open source collaborative effort created to advance cross-industry blockchain technologies, announced today the inaugural 2018 Hyperledger Global Forum, which will take place December 12-15 in Basel, Switzerland at the Congress Center Basel.

The 2018 Hyperledger Global Forum will convene the global enterprise blockchain community to advance these critical technologies. The agenda will comprise of both enterprise and technical tracks covering a mix of topics including blockchain in the enterprise, distributed ledger and smart contracts 101, roadmaps for Hyperledger projects, industry keynotes and use cases in development. There will also be social networking for the community to bond, and hacking activities with mentors to help facilitate software development collaboration and knowledge sharing to bring developers up the learning curve.

“This year’s Global Forum will be the premier event to collaborate and better understand Hyperledger blockchain technologies, real use cases and production deployment challenges facing enterprises today,” said Brian Behlendorf, Executive Director, Hyperledger. “For anyone still wrestling with how blockchain will transform businesses processes, and where their industry fits in, this is the perfect opportunity to learn more.”

Open to members and non-members alike, attendees will have the chance to talk directly with Hyperledger project maintainers and the Technical Steering Committee, collaborate with other organizations on ideas that will directly impact the future of Hyperledger, and promote their work among the communities.

A call for papers, keynote speakers and the conference schedule will be announced this summer. For more information about the 2018 Hyperledger Global Forum, please visit: https://events.linuxfoundation.org/events/hyperledger-global-forum-2018/

Help us spread the word! Click the following links to Tweet and share on your social networks using #HyperledgerForum.

Inaugural 2018 #HyperledgerForum announced! Learn more about the event here: http://bit.ly/2Dkpwby

Click to tweet: https://ctt.ec/xJ6CN

Developers, enterprise end-users & enthusiasts of Hyperledger blockchain technologies are headed to Europe in December for the Inaugural #HyperledgerForum. Learn more: http://bit.ly/2Dkpwby

Click to tweet: https://ctt.ec/90l6e

Don’t miss the Inaugural 2018 #HyperledgerForum happening Dec 12-15 in Basel, Switzerland. More details: http://bit.ly/2Dkpwby

Click to tweet: https://ctt.ec/J16ow

About Hyperledger

Hyperledger is an open source collaborative effort created to advance cross-industry blockchain technologies. It is a global collaboration including leaders in finance, banking, Internet of Things, supply chains, manufacturing and Technology. The Linux Foundation hosts Hyperledger under the Foundation. To learn more, visit: https://www.hyperledger.org/.

blockchain

While some companies are looking at blockchain’s future impact, the technology is changing our world right now.

Influencers from around the world will gather for the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland next week, where leaders are encouraged “to develop a shared perspective on political, economic, and social topics to embrace positive change globally.” Talks will explore free and open source tools and practices as well as the underlying technologies, and one of the hotly debated subjects will certainly be blockchain.

Blockchain technology, which encompasses smart contracts and distributed ledgers, can be used to record promises, trades, and transactions. It allows everyone in an ecosystem to keep a copy of the common system of record, and nothing can ever be erased or edited. When transactions are processed in blocks according to the ordering of a blockchain, the result is a distributed ledger.

Open source collaboration

Hyperledger is an open source collaborative effort created to advance cross-industry blockchain technologies. Member organizations from within finance, banking, manufacturing, and technology are helping steer the project, which aims to provide the modular components that will allow enterprises to build the solutions they need.

Headlines frequently herald how blockchain technology will revolutionize financial services markets, but blockchain will also have a transformative impact on everything from the food industry to healthcare. While some companies are looking at blockchain’s future impact, the technology is changing our world right now. According to a Forbes article, blockchain is revolutionizing contracts, payment processing, asset protection, and supply chain management. And, a market intelligence report by BIS Research reports that blockchain-driven cost savings of $30 to $40 billion per year will be achieved in trade finance.

“Blockchain has the potential to be highly transformative to any company that processes payments,” Forbes noted. “It can eliminate the need for intermediaries that are common in payment processing today.

The future is now

Meanwhile, blockchain technology is already impacting various industries. In the area of global food supply chain management, for example, Intel is collaborating with the Hyperledger community to implement a modern approach to seafood traceability. Using the Hyperledger Sawtooth framework, the seafood journey can now be recorded from ocean to table.

Dot Blockchain Media (dotBC) is using Hyperledger Sawtooth to build a music content rights registry that will help musicians express their rights  and commercialize their art in an interoperable file format. And, as reported by HealthCareITNews, Change Healthcare just launched an enterprise-scale blockchain network using distributed ledger technology. This Intelligent Healthcare Network, built on Hyperledger Fabric, allows hospitals, physicians, and payers to track the real-time status of healthcare claims, thereby providing greater transparency and efficiency.

Given the potential impact of these and other efforts, Hyperledger is likely to feature prominently in talks at Davos. According to a recent Hyperledger post: “Companies large and small, IT vendors and end-user organizations, consortiums and NGOs — everyone took notice of Hyperledger in 2017 and made moves to get involved. This was evident in the ever increasing Hyperledger membership, which nearly doubled in size.” Hyperledger now has support from 197 organizations, which will allow the project to double the resources they can apply toward building and supporting the community in 2018.

Now is a great time to find out more about blockchain and Hyperledger. Case studies, a webinar, and training resources are available from Hyperledger.org. Additionally, Hyperledger incubates and promotes a range of business blockchain technologies, including distributed ledger frameworks, smart contract engines, client libraries, utility libraries, graphical interfaces, and sample applications. You can find out more about these projects here.

blockchain

While some companies are looking at blockchain’s future impact, the technology is changing our world right now.

Influencers from around the world will gather for the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland next week, where leaders are encouraged “to develop a shared perspective on political, economic, and social topics to embrace positive change globally.” Talks will explore free and open source tools and practices as well as the underlying technologies, and one of the hotly debated subjects will certainly be blockchain.

Blockchain technology, which encompasses smart contracts and distributed ledgers, can be used to record promises, trades, and transactions. It allows everyone in an ecosystem to keep a copy of the common system of record, and nothing can ever be erased or edited. When transactions are processed in blocks according to the ordering of a blockchain, the result is a distributed ledger.

Open source collaboration

Hyperledger is an open source collaborative effort created to advance cross-industry blockchain technologies. Member organizations from within finance, banking, manufacturing, and technology are helping steer the project, which aims to provide the modular components that will allow enterprises to build the solutions they need.

Headlines frequently herald how blockchain technology will revolutionize financial services markets, but blockchain will also have a transformative impact on everything from the food industry to healthcare. While some companies are looking at blockchain’s future impact, the technology is changing our world right now. According to a Forbes article, blockchain is revolutionizing contracts, payment processing, asset protection, and supply chain management. And, a market intelligence report by BIS Research reports that blockchain-driven cost savings of $30 to $40 billion per year will be achieved in trade finance.

“Blockchain has the potential to be highly transformative to any company that processes payments,” Forbes noted. “It can eliminate the need for intermediaries that are common in payment processing today.

The future is now

Meanwhile, blockchain technology is already impacting various industries. In the area of global food supply chain management, for example, Intel is collaborating with the Hyperledger community to implement a modern approach to seafood traceability. Using the Hyperledger Sawtooth framework, the seafood journey can now be recorded from ocean to table.

Dot Blockchain Media (dotBC) is using Hyperledger Sawtooth to build a music content rights registry that will help musicians express their rights  and commercialize their art in an interoperable file format. And, as reported by HealthCareITNews, Change Healthcare just launched an enterprise-scale blockchain network using distributed ledger technology. This Intelligent Healthcare Network, built on Hyperledger Fabric, allows hospitals, physicians, and payers to track the real-time status of healthcare claims, thereby providing greater transparency and efficiency.

Given the potential impact of these and other efforts, Hyperledger is likely to feature prominently in talks at Davos. According to a recent Hyperledger post: “Companies large and small, IT vendors and end-user organizations, consortiums and NGOs — everyone took notice of Hyperledger in 2017 and made moves to get involved. This was evident in the ever increasing Hyperledger membership, which nearly doubled in size.” Hyperledger now has support from 197 organizations, which will allow the project to double the resources they can apply toward building and supporting the community in 2018.

Now is a great time to find out more about blockchain and Hyperledger. Case studies, a webinar, and training resources are available from Hyperledger.org. Additionally, Hyperledger incubates and promotes a range of business blockchain technologies, including distributed ledger frameworks, smart contract engines, client libraries, utility libraries, graphical interfaces, and sample applications. You can find out more about these projects here.

“Change Healthcare uses Hyperledger Fabric 1.0 – an open-source blockchain framework hosted by The Linux Foundation – as the foundation for its blockchain app design and development in the network.”

http://www.healthcarefinancenews.com/news/change-healthcares-enterprise-blockchain-tech-now-available-hospitals-practices-payers

“Change Healthcare uses Hyperledger Fabric 1.0 – an open-source blockchain framework hosted by The Linux Foundation – as the foundation for its blockchain app design and development in the network.”

http://www.healthcarefinancenews.com/news/change-healthcares-enterprise-blockchain-tech-now-available-hospitals-practices-payers

highway intersection

SAP’s increasing participation in the open source software ecosystem shows their growing commitment to open source.

SAP has joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation as the sixth Platinum level member to join so far this fall. This comes on the heels of the company joining The Linux Foundation’s Open API Initiative on September 24.

SAP is one of the largest and most important makers of enterprise software in the world today. And their increasing participation in the open source software (OSS) ecosystem shows their growing commitment to open source and underscores the value that OSS brings to businesses – even businesses with significant proprietary software revenue lines.

In recent years, we at The Linux Foundation have seen SAP invest more and more resources in open source software. They were early members of the Cloud Foundry Foundation and have worked with that group and with Pivotal Labs to build open source tooling for that cloud application platform. SAP also uses many innovative OSS tools in various offerings. For example, their HANA Vora Big Data problem incorporates a number of components of the Apache Hadoop stack.  And in Europe, SAP has become a leading advocate for open source technologies.

SAP is becoming a great example of how a company can embrace the new ways of open innovation and leverage those for better relationships with developers, partners, and customers. Across the organization, SAP is diving into newer ways of running its software and delivering services with modern, innovative OSS tools. That ranges from using containers and Kubernetes for orchestrating microservices and breaking down monolithic apps into cloud-native architectures, to pairing big data, machine learning, and analytics tools out of open source with proprietary databases like SAP’s HANA in-memory database.

And all of it, of course, can run on the Linux operating system. Since I am the Executive Director of The Linux Foundation, I’m biased in that regard. At any rate, I wanted to personally welcome SAP into the CNCF and Open API folds. I am confident they will both contribute and gain massively from increased participation our world.

 

highway intersection

SAP’s increasing participation in the open source software ecosystem shows their growing commitment to open source.

SAP has joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation as the sixth Platinum level member to join so far this fall. This comes on the heels of the company joining The Linux Foundation’s Open API Initiative on September 24.

SAP is one of the largest and most important makers of enterprise software in the world today. And their increasing participation in the open source software (OSS) ecosystem shows their growing commitment to open source and underscores the value that OSS brings to businesses – even businesses with significant proprietary software revenue lines.

In recent years, we at The Linux Foundation have seen SAP invest more and more resources in open source software. They were early members of the Cloud Foundry Foundation and have worked with that group and with Pivotal Labs to build open source tooling for that cloud application platform. SAP also uses many innovative OSS tools in various offerings. For example, their HANA Vora Big Data problem incorporates a number of components of the Apache Hadoop stack.  And in Europe, SAP has become a leading advocate for open source technologies.

SAP is becoming a great example of how a company can embrace the new ways of open innovation and leverage those for better relationships with developers, partners, and customers. Across the organization, SAP is diving into newer ways of running its software and delivering services with modern, innovative OSS tools. That ranges from using containers and Kubernetes for orchestrating microservices and breaking down monolithic apps into cloud-native architectures, to pairing big data, machine learning, and analytics tools out of open source with proprietary databases like SAP’s HANA in-memory database.

And all of it, of course, can run on the Linux operating system. Since I am the Executive Director of The Linux Foundation, I’m biased in that regard. At any rate, I wanted to personally welcome SAP into the CNCF and Open API folds. I am confident they will both contribute and gain massively from increased participation our world.

 

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TSC Election email

The Linux Foundation maintains an expert staff with decades of combined experience managing the operations of large scale, Openly Governed Open Source projects. For Hyperledger, the Sr. Program Manager Todd Benzies ensures the TSC election runs smoothly.

Today, most people understand the concept of Open Source – certainly we expect most readers of this blog to understand it. View the code, use the code, copy the code, change the code, and, depending on the license, contribute back changes or not.

What many people don’t get, and something we here at Hyperledger and The Linux Foundation pride ourselves on doing well, is Open Governance.

The Linux Foundation, and all of our 75+ open source projects, are not-for-profits building the greatest shared R&D investment in history. Open Governance is central to this promise.

What is Open Governance?

Open Governance means that technical decisions – which features to add, how to add them and when, among others – for a given Open Source project or projects are made by a group of community-elected developers drawn from a pool of active participants. It is as close to the ideal of pure technical meritocracy as one can get and we strive continuously to reach that ideal.

Hyperledger recently concluded its 2017-2018 Technical Steering Committee (TSC) election, and so we thought it an opportune time to explain the ABCs of Open Governance. Please note that this is one Open Governance implementation and clearly not the only way to do it, but rather one proven and effective way.

Read more about how Hyperledger approaches governance at the Hyperledger blog.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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TSC Election email

The Linux Foundation maintains an expert staff with decades of combined experience managing the operations of large scale, Openly Governed Open Source projects. For Hyperledger, the Sr. Program Manager Todd Benzies ensures the TSC election runs smoothly.

Today, most people understand the concept of Open Source – certainly we expect most readers of this blog to understand it. View the code, use the code, copy the code, change the code, and, depending on the license, contribute back changes or not.

What many people don’t get, and something we here at Hyperledger and The Linux Foundation pride ourselves on doing well, is Open Governance.

The Linux Foundation, and all of our 75+ open source projects, are not-for-profits building the greatest shared R&D investment in history. Open Governance is central to this promise.

What is Open Governance?

Open Governance means that technical decisions – which features to add, how to add them and when, among others – for a given Open Source project or projects are made by a group of community-elected developers drawn from a pool of active participants. It is as close to the ideal of pure technical meritocracy as one can get and we strive continuously to reach that ideal.

Hyperledger recently concluded its 2017-2018 Technical Steering Committee (TSC) election, and so we thought it an opportune time to explain the ABCs of Open Governance. Please note that this is one Open Governance implementation and clearly not the only way to do it, but rather one proven and effective way.

Read more about how Hyperledger approaches governance at the Hyperledger blog.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]