Watch the keynotes LIVE next week at Open Source Summit & ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe.

Open Source Summit & ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe is taking place in Edinburgh, UK next week, October 22-24, 2018. Can’t make it? You’ll be missed, but you don’t have to miss out on the action. Tune into the free livestream to catch all of the keynotes live from your desktop, tablet or phone! Sign up now >>

Hear from the leading technologists in open source! Get an inside scoop on:

  • An update on the Linux Kernel
  • Diversity & inclusion to fuel open source growth
  • How open source is changing banking
  • How to build an open source culture within organizations
  • Human rights & scientific collaboration
  • The future of AI and Deep Learning
  • The future of energy with open source
  • The parallels between open source & video games

Live video streaming of the keynote sessions from Open Source Summit & ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe will take place during the following times:

Monday, October 22

9:00 – 10:20 (BST)

Watch keynotes from Open Invention Network, LF Energy, Intel, LWN.net, and The Linux Foundation.

Tuesday, October 23

9:00 – 10:20 (BST)

Watch keynotes from Vibrant Data, Microsoft, IBM, and Human Rights Data Analysis Group.

Wednesday, October 24

9:00 – 10:00 (BST)

Watch keynotes from Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, IBM, and Mifos Initiative.

View the full keynote schedule >>

Sign up for free live stream now >>

SAN FRANCISCO, October 15, 2018Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open platform for the connected car, today announced the latest release of the AGL platform, Unified Code Base (UCB) 6.0, which features device profiles for telematics and instrument cluster.

“The addition of the telematics and instrument cluster profiles opens up new deployment possibilities for AGL,” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at The Linux Foundation. “Motorcycles, fleet services, rental car tracking, basic economy cars with good old-fashioned radios, essentially any vehicle without a head unit or infotainment display can now leverage the AGL Unified Code Base as a starting point for their products.”

Developed through a joint effort by dozens of member companies, the AGL Unified Code Base (UCB) is an open source software platform that can serve as the de facto industry standard for infotainment, telematics and instrument cluster applications. Sharing a single software platform across the industry reduces fragmentation and accelerates time-to-market by encouraging the growth of a global ecosystem of developers and application providers that can build a product once and have it work for multiple automakers.

Many AGL members have already started integrating the UCB into their production plans. Mercedes-Benz Vans is using AGL as a foundation for a new onboard operating system for its commercial vehicles, and Toyota’s AGL-based infotainment system is now in vehicles globally.

The AGL UCB 6.0 includes an operating system, middleware and application framework. Key features include:

  • Device profiles for telematics and instrument cluster
  • Core AGL Service layer can be built stand-alone
  • Reference applications including media player, tuner, navigation, web browser, Bluetooth, WiFi, HVAC control, audio mixer and vehicle controls
  • Integration with simultaneous display on IVI system and instrument cluster
  • Multiple display capability including rear seat entertainment
  • Wide range of hardware board support including Renesas, Qualcomm Technologies, Intel, Texas Instrument, NXP and Raspberry Pi
  • Software Development Kit (SDK) with application templates  
  • SmartDeviceLink ready for easy integration and access to smartphone applications
  • Application Services APIs for navigation, voice recognition, bluetooth, audio, tuner and CAN signaling
  • Near Field Communication (NFC) and identity management capabilities including multilingual support
  • Over-The-Air (OTA) upgrade capabilities
  • Security frameworks with role-based-access control

The full list of additions to the UCB 6.0 can be found here.

The global AGL community will gather in Dresden, Germany for the bi-annual All Member Meeting on October 17-18, 2018. At this gathering, members and community leaders will get together to share best practices and future plans for the project. To learn more or register, please visit here.

About Automotive Grade Linux (AGL)

Automotive Grade Linux is a collaborative open source project that is bringing together automakers, suppliers and technology companies to accelerate the development and adoption of a fully open software stack for the connected car. With Linux at its core, AGL is developing an open platform from the ground up that can serve as the de facto industry standard to enable rapid development of new features and technologies. Although initially focused on In-Vehicle-Infotainment (IVI), AGL is the only organization planning to address all software in the vehicle, including instrument cluster, heads up display, telematics, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) and autonomous driving. The AGL platform is available to all, and anyone can participate in its development. Learn more: https://www.automotivelinux.org/

 

Automotive Grade Linux is a Collaborative Project at The Linux Foundation. Linux Foundation Collaborative Projects are independently funded software projects that harness the power of collaborative development to fuel innovation across industries and ecosystems. www.linuxfoundation.org

 

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

 

Media Inquiries

Emily Olin

Automotive Grade Linux

eolin@linuxfoundation.org

The Real-Time Linux project team continues to prepare the remaining patches for inclusion into the mainline kernel.

Long ago in 2009, a small team of kernel developers had finished consolidating previous  prototypic developments to make Linux real-time capable into a single out-of-tree patch set, called the PREEMPT_RT patch set. This patch set can be applied to turn a vanilla mainline Linux kernel without real-time capabilities into a real-time capable Linux kernel. Many companies use this patch set to build various industrial systems that required to implement hard real-time properties at comparatively relaxed time bounds of about one millisecond precision.

BMW Car IT also used this patch set to build real-time capable prototypes for complex functions in the area of autonomous driving. However, from the beginning with the development of those prototypes, it was clear that any product with high-quality demands requires to get the PREEMPT_RT patch set in the main-line development for increased compatibility of features, stronger quality assurance and reduced maintenance. Hence, BMW Car IT started driving efforts to make Linux real-time capable in 2014.

First, BMW Car IT joined OSADL, the Open Source Automation Development Lab, as a Gold member to support real-time Linux development activities, which was collaboratively funded by the OSADL member at that time.

Second, our former colleague Daniel Wagner started to get acquainted with the existing PREEMPT_RT patch in 2014 and made a number of contributions to the Linux kernel related to real-time capabilities from 2015 until end of 2016. Due to his experience with the PREEMPT_RT patch, he is now the maintainer of the Linux 4.4 real-time stable branch, and one of the three maintainers for the real-time stable patch branches.

Since 2016, the Real-time Linux project has been a collaborative project under the umbrella of the Linux Foundation. The project’s goal is to make the mainline Linux real-time capable. The project ensures that the Linux kernel developers have the ability to continue development work, long-term support and future research for a real-time-capable Linux.

Rewriting and Refactoring

In the last two years, 2016 and 2017, the Real-time Linux development team rewrote the CPU hotplug infrastructure and refactored the timer wheel and high-resolution timers. This already reduced the out-of-tree PREEMPT_RT patch set significantly.

Due to a funding decrease that became apparent at the beginning of 2018, the development in the Real-time Linux project would have reduced its workforce. Fortunately, Intel and BMW Car IT could close this funding gap. Intel increased their membership from Gold to Platinum and BMW Car IT joined Linux Foundation and the collaborative project as Gold member in the Real-time Linux Project. So now after those project adjustments, the Real-time Linux Project team is back on track and continues to prepare the remaining patches for inclusion into the mainline development with full speed.

In 2018, the Real-time Linux kernel team will be refactoring, rewriting and generally improving the printk and soft interrupt infrastructure and other smaller other parts. This work will prepare the Linux kernel source code so that all further real-time specific changes can smoothly be merged into the mainline kernel.

The real-time functionality touches the core kernel parts (i.e., it requires significant changes in timers, schedulers, locking mechanisms, interrupt handling and more), and it also is a cross-cutting concern for all drivers (i.e., every driver has to follow a certain discipline to make the overall kernel real-time capable). Hence, it is difficult to predict the exact date when the Real-time Linux Project will finally have all its patches merged into the main-line development. However, there is no doubt that the Linux kernel will eventually become real-time capable.

“The Linux kernel is a software development project of huge invest to us. Obviously, BMW Car IT has a high interest of making best possible use of this software asset. The automotive industry has particular requirements, such as higher real-time requirements and the need for longer maintenance periods, than the general IT and consumer electronics industry. With our investments in initiatives addressing these requirements, we can ensure that Linux fits to our needs,” says Kai-Uwe Balszuweit, CEO of BMW Car IT.

Reviewing and Testing

Once the real-time capabilities have been integrated in the main-line development, the project work is of course not just finished and the Real-time Linux project cannot just be abandoned. After the final integration into the main-line development, the development activities will slowly shift its focus:

The core system will not require further changes for the real-time capability, but the Real-Time Linux development team will need to review, test and adjust new incoming features from other kernel development teams to keep the kernel real-time capable when these new features are included.

Furthermore, the already existing real-time stable trees must be further continued to be maintained until the end of life of the corresponding kernel LTS version, so commonly two years for most LTS versions, but possibly even longer. Slowly over the years, the real-time stable trees for older kernel versions will reach their end of life, while for younger LTS kernel versions, which have the real-time capabilities fully included, have no need to maintain a separate real-time stable branch. This will decrease the working effort on the current real-time stable maintainers and they can focus their work to assist in the quality assurance of the continuous main-line development.

Of course, all users and stakeholders of the real-time capability must continue to support all these activities over the next years.

This is well understood at BMW Car IT, and we expect that other companies that require the real-time capability in Linux will also follow and express this general common understanding. Beyond software development until start of production, operations and maintenance is an important software development activity that is not underestimated at BMW Car IT.

Christian Salzmann, the CEO of BMW Car IT, states it clearly: “Providing good software solutions to BMW for many years, BMW Car IT knows that continuous operations and maintenance is one of the major cornerstones for providing a great experience to our customers. The continuous activity of development and operations of software going hand-in-hand, in short DevOps, is part of BMW Car IT’s company mindset. BMW Car IT’s support for further development and operations in the Real-time Linux Project is no exception to this rule.”

Arm and Facebook demonstrate support for open source embedded technologies

VANCOUVER, B.C. – (August 28, 2018) – The Yocto Project, an open source collaboration project that helps developers create custom Linux-based systems for embedded products, today announces continued growth with two new platinum members, an upcoming project release and ongoing community engagement.

The Yocto Project provides a flexible set of tools and a space where embedded developers worldwide can share technologies, software stacks, configurations, and best practices to create tailored Linux images for embedded and Internet of Things (IOT) devices. The Yocto Project launched in 2011 and currently has over 22 active members.

Arm and Facebook join the Yocto Project at Platinum level adding their technical and financial support towards consolidating the Yocto Project as a secure, stable and adaptable industry standard. “We are delighted to welcome Arm and Facebook to the Yocto Project at the Platinum level,” said Lieu Ta, Senior Director of Governance and Business Operations at Wind River and Chair of the Yocto Project Advisory Board. “With their continued support, we are furthering the embedded systems ecosystem and the Yocto Project as a whole.” Arm and Facebook join the current Platinum members – Intel and Texas Instruments – thus strengthening the Yocto Project Board with their contributions.

Richard Purdie continues to lead the Yocto Project as Project Architect and Linux Foundation Fellow. Richard’s position is now supported directly by the Yocto Project, supplemented by a generous grant from Comcast. Under Purdie’s leadership, the project is on track for their upcoming fall release. “The next release will demonstrate Yocto Project’s ability to efficiently build and importantly, test complete Linux software stacks which are reproducible, easily audited and totally customizable in a maintainable way,” said Richard Purdie, Project Architect of the Yocto Project.

The Yocto Project will be onsite at Embedded Linux Conference Europe, October 22-24, 2018 in Edinburgh, United Kingdom. Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) is the premier vendor-neutral technical conference for companies and developers using Linux in embedded products. Members of the Yocto Project community will participate in a variety of sessions, presentations and tutorials during the event. Additionally, the Yocto Project will host a bi-annual Developer’s Day on October 25, 2018. For more information and to register for the DevDay, visit here. To learn more about Yocto Project’s onsite presence, visit here.

Arm

“As the IoT matures, new embedded applications emerge and autonomous vehicles become a reality, Arm is committed to enabling embedded developers to innovate quickly, and open-source software is key to this,” said Rhonda Dirvin, Senior Director, Marketing, Embedded & Automotive Line of Business, Arm.“The Yocto Project provides an excellent framework to facilitate embedded Linux development, and through our membership we will collaborate with the community to further advance Yocto Project’s custom open-source distribution.”

Comcast

“We are honored to help support the Yocto Project, which continues to play an essential role in advancing open-source solutions in the IoT and embedded space,” said Nithya A Ruff, Head of Comcast Open Source Practice. “The Yocto project continues to thrive thanks to the contribution of a dynamic, diverse group of contributors and participants, and exemplifies the vibrancy of the global open-source community.”

Facebook

“The Yocto Project is the basis for important open source and embedded firmware initiatives,” said Aaron Sullivan, Director of Hardware Engineering at Facebook. “We are happy to lend our support to the Yocto Project community, and look forward to joining with other members in this important work.”

Intel

“We are delighted to see the Yocto Project’s continued growth,” said Imad Sousou, Corporate Vice President and General Manager of the Open Source Technology Center, Intel. “These new members bring a diverse set of perspectives, and we look forward to their contributions.”

Texas Instruments

“Developers continue to optimize high-quality, differentiated software to enhance product capabilities and ultimately shorten development cycles. Open source software frameworks like the Yocto Project and the Open Embedded Software Foundation give programmers the opportunity to develop a robust software framework that’s scalable across systems. By adding new platinum members, the Yocto Project can continue their work furthering the development of Embedded Linux,” said Bill Mills, Open Source Architect, Texas Instruments.”

About Yocto Project

The Yocto Project is an open source collaboration project that helps developers create custom Linux-based systems for embedded products, regardless of the hardware architecture. To learn more about the project or how to join, please contact Kate Stewart (kstewart@linuxfoundation.org). For additional information about the project, please visit here.

Media Inquiries

Dan Brown

The Linux Foundation

dbrown@linuxfoundation.org

SAN FRANCISCO, August 16, 2018 –  Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open platform for the connected car, is announcing that six new members have joined the project including Kinetica, Neusoft, NXM Technologies, NYU Tandon School of Engineering, Spireon Inc. and Veniam. With the addition of these companies and organizations, the project is 130 members strong.

“We are delighted to see six new members deepen their investment in automotive open source,” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux, The Linux Foundation. “As we continue to advance our platform through the release of AGL UCB 6.0, expanding our global community is crucial. We look forward to further leveraging their expertise in embedded automotive technologies as we advance the connected car ecosystem.”

AGL will participate in THE premiere open source event, Open Source Summit North America happening August 29-31, 2018 in Vancouver B.C. Open Source Summit connects the open source ecosystem under one roof in a unique environment for cross-collaboration between developers, sysadmins, devops, architects and others who are driving technology forward. Dan Cauchy will present “Accelerating Connected & Autonomous Vehicles through Open Source Software” on Thursday, August 30 at 11:50 am (Vancouver local time). To learn more about Dan’s presentation and register for the event, visit here.

New Member Quotes:

HERE

“With HERE OTA Connect, automakers and device manufacturers have a complete solution for fast, secure updates to all parts of the vehicle. Joining AGL as a Bronze member shows the commitment of HERE to open source and to the agl-sota subsystem,” said Arthur Taylor, Director of Automotive OTA Research and Development at HERE Technologies. “Automakers, device manufacturers, tinkerers, and anyone else developing on AGL will continue to benefit from easy build system integration and out-of-the-box OTA updates. We also look forward to making it easier than ever to build smart location-based services in AGL using the HERE Open Location Platform.”

Kinetica

“Kinetica is proud to join the Automotive Grade Linux community,” said Paul Appleby, Kinetica CEO. “The auto industry is being completely reinvented in the age of extreme data and AI. Joining AGL gives us an opportunity to collaborate with industry leaders to build in-vehicle accelerated analytics solutions that can translate extreme data into instant insight.”

Neusoft

“Neusoft is a provider of IT solutions and services in China that provides innovative information technology through enabled products, solutions and services. We are proud to be part of the Linux Foundation and Automotive Grade Linux community to contribute our expertise and to collaborate with other members.”

NYU Tandon School of Engineering

“The NYU Tandon School of Engineering is proud to join the Automotive Grade Linux community, whose members share the deeply held belief of our Uptane researchers that the free and open exchange of knowledge will strengthen our transportation system and protect all drivers and their passengers. Our school and the University-wide Center for Cybersecurity look forward to productive collaborations that will benefit our mobile society.” – Katepalli R. Sreenivasan, New York University Tandon School of Engineering Dean

NXM Technologies

“Today’s vehicles are mobile computing platforms with Automotive Grade Linux emerging as the operating system of choice for new car manufacturers and OEM component suppliers,” said Scott Rankine, Co-founder and CEO of NXM Labs. “We’re launching NXM Wave™, the first 5G-ready, high-speed in-car router powered by Sprint that comes with a full AGL software stack protected by the world’s first Blockchain operating system. NXM Wave is designed to enable the nearly two billion vehicles currently on the road to join the connected car revolution.”

Spireon

“Spireon has nearly four million vehicles connected to our NSpire platform, and data from more than three hundred twenty-six billion driving miles under our belt, so we fully understand the challenges of a fragmented telematics ecosystem that the AGL project seeks to overcome,” said Rick Gruenhagen, CTO of Spireon. “A standardized software stack will accelerate autonomous and other connected vehicle benefits by helping solution providers like Spireon gain secure access to in-vehicle functions and data that have been locked in OEM-specific implementations until now.”

Veniam

“Open Source Software, and in particular AGL, is playing an important role to accelerate ubiquitous, data-heavy, and more secure connectivity between vehicles and the cloud.”, said Rui Costa, CTO at Veniam. “Veniam has led the way in the new Internet of Moving Things with years of experience architecting and operating mesh networks of connected vehicles in global cities. We look forward to bringing this experience to the AGL community and working together to help the automotive industry make leaps forward.”

 

About Automotive Grade Linux (AGL)

Automotive Grade Linux is a collaborative open source project that aims to accelerate the development and adoption of a fully open software stack for the connected car. Leveraging the power and strength of Linux at its core, AGL is uniting automakers and technology companies to develop an open platform that offers OEMs complete control of the user experience so the industry can rapidly innovate where it counts. The AGL platform is available to all, and anyone can participate in its development. Learn more: https://www.automotivelinux.org/

Automotive Grade Linux is hosted at The Linux Foundation. Linux Foundation projects are independently funded software projects that harness the power of collaborative development to fuel innovation across industries and ecosystems.

 

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and industry adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

 

Additional Resources

 

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Media Inquiries

Emily Olin

Automotive Grade Linux

eolin@linuxfoundation.org

Premier open source event offers keynote sessions covering data, gaming, microfinance and other topics related to open source technology

SAN FRANCISCO, August 7, 2018The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the keynote speakers for Open Source Summit Europe and Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit Europe, taking place October 22-24 in Edinburgh, Scotland.

Open Source Summit Europe is the leading conference for developers, architects and other technologists – as well as open source community and industry leaders – to collaborate, share information, learn about the latest technologies and gain a competitive advantage by using innovative open solutions. Over 2,000 are expected to gather for the event.

Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) is the premier vendor-neutral technical conference for companies and developers using Linux in embedded products. The conference gathers user-space developers, product vendors, kernel, and systems developers to collaborate.

OpenIoT Summit is a technical conference for the developers and architects working on industrial IoT. It provides the technical knowledge needed to deliver smart connected products and solutions that take advantage of the rapid evolution of IoT technologies. It is the only IoT event focused on the development of open IoT solutions.

Keynote speakers include:

  • Patrick Ball, Director of Research, Human Rights Data Analysis Group
  • Eric Berlow, Co-Founder, Chief Science Officer, Vibrant Data Inc.
  • Ed Cable, President & Chief Executive Officer, Mifos Initiative
  • Jonathan Corbet, Author, Kernel Developer and Executive Editor, LWN.net
  • Johanna Koester, Program Director of Developer Technology and Advocacy, IBM
  • Dr. Alexander Nitz, Gravitational-wave Researcher, Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics
  • Brenda Romero, Award-Winning Game Designer, Fulbright Scholar & Entrepreneur
  • Linus Torvalds, Creator of Linux & Git, in conversation with Dirk Hohndel, Vice President & Chief Open Source Officer, VMware
  • Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation

The full schedule of sessions will be announced next week, with additional keynotes announced shortly thereafter.

Registration is $800 through August 18 and includes access to all sessions at both Open Source Summit Europe and Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit Europe. Additional alumni, academic, non-profit and Linux Foundation member discounts are available as well; details are available on the event registration page. Applications for diversity and needs-based scholarships are currently being accepted. For information on eligibility and how to apply, please click here.

The Linux Foundation events are where the world’s leading technologists meet, collaborate, learn and network in order to advance innovations that support the world’s largest shared technologies.

Members of the press who would like to request a press pass to attend should contact Dan Brown at dbrown@linuxfoundation.org.

Open Source Summit Europe and Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit Europe are made possible thanks to Diamond Sponsors Intel and Microsoft; Platinum Sponsors IBM and SUSE; and Gold Sponsors Amazon Web Services, Nutanix, Red Hat, Sumologic and VMware.

Additional Resources

YouTube: Why Attend Linux Foundation Events (https://youtu.be/X_rLxfmLlYY)

Open Source Summit Europe 2017 Event Recap (https://events17.linuxfoundation.org/events/open-source-summit-europe)

Embedded Linux Conference Europe 2017 Event Recap (https://events17.linuxfoundation.org/events/embedded-linux-conference-europe)

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and industry adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage.

Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

# # #

“The edge is anything that’s not cloud.” — Keith Townsend, The CTO-Advisor

“The edge is the bumper of a car.” — Anonymous[1]

“Edge computing is compute that’s closer to the consumer.” — Mark Imbriaco, Pivotal

 

If you surveyed a group of people and asked them to define “edge computing,” you may very well get a variety of different answers.

For those of us who want to make software that capitalizes on this next stage in the evolution of the internet, that’s a problem. Unless we share a common vocabulary for the particulars of edge computing, we risk crippling ourselves and slowing our progress.

Think of all the technologies we use today, from foundational network protocols and APIs to the worldwide network of networks that we call the internet. How successful would they be, and how much work would be able to get done using them, if we couldn’t agree on what each of them were called? We’d be forced to laboriously reinvent the wheel, constantly looking for a coherent definition that everyone agreed to, fighting against others. Without a shared understanding of the terminology and concepts behind them, we’d be lost.

Agreeing on the precise words we use when we speak of important technologies increases the speed of innovation. If I say, “64-bit hash” and you and I have a shared understanding of both “bit” and “hash,” our communication will be lighting fast. If our meanings diverge, our communications will be laborious at best, disastrous at worst.

This is the situation that exists today with edge computing. Today, the industry has not agreed on a single, consistent lexicon that describes what edge computing is; what its component parts are, how they inter-operate, and how edge computing can be used to support the next wave of innovative new applications such as autonomous vehicles and large-scale IoT networks. As edge computing moves out of its science project stage and into real-world deployment, it will need to be built on this shared edge lexicon.

The   emerged organically from a community of passionate edge computing specialists, including a range of parties from edge computing infrastructure manufacturers, cloud providers and independent industry analysts. As the project gained momentum, The Linux Foundation agreed to be its steward.

This project welcomes collaboration. If you have domain expertise in any of the aspects of edge computing, we invite you to contribute. Let’s work together to rigorously define the key terms in the edge computing ecosystem, in order to provide the industry with a Rosetta Stone for converting the hieroglyphics of edge technology into a shared understanding.

As a Linux Foundation project, the Open Glossary of Edge Computing will continuously evolve based on community involvement. The aim of this project is to maintain a current, useful and concise reference for edge computing so that this new area of technology can be better understood by everyone across any number of industries. Like other Linux Foundation projects, the Open Glossary of Edge Computing project is freely licensed[2] and the community will adhere to the same governance principles as other open source projects.

We look forward to joining you in the community. The internet of the future is stronger when we all share in its creation and this project is an excellent way to do that.

[1] Actually overheard at June 21, 2018 Telecom Council meeting. It was in response to the question, “Where is the edge?”

[2] The glossary itself carries a Creative Commons BY-SA 4.0 license.

 

Open Source Summit

Join us in Edinburgh! Submit a proposal to speak by July 1 for Open Source Summit & ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe.

Submit a proposal to speak at Open Source Summit Europe & ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe, taking place October 22-24, 2018, in Edinburgh, UK, and share your knowledge and expertise with 2,000+ open source technologists and community leaders. Proposals are being accepted through 11:59pm PDT, Sunday, July 1.

This year’s tracks and content will cover the following areas at Open Source Summit Europe:

  • Cloud Native Apps/Serverless/Microservices
  • Infrastructure & Automation (Cloud/Cloud Native/DevOps)
  • Linux Systems
  • Artificial Intelligence & Data Analytics
  • Emerging Technologies & Wildcard (Networking, Edge, IoT, Hardware, Blockchain)
  • Community, Compliance, Governance, Culture, Open Source Program Management (Open Collaboration Conference track)
  • Diversity & Inclusion (Diversity Empowerment Summit)
  • Innovation at Apache/Apache Projects
  • TODO / Open Source Program Management

View the full list of suggested topics for Open Source Summit Europe.

Suggested Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) Topics:

  • Audio, Video, Streaming Media and Graphics
  • Security
  • System Size, Boot Speed
  • Real-Time Linux – Performance, Tuning and Mainlining
  • SDKs for Embedded Products
  • Flash Memory Devices and Filesystems
  • Build Systems, Embedded Distributions and Development Tools
  • Linux in Devices such as Mobile Phones, DVRs, TVs, Cameras, etc
  • Use of Linux in Automotive
  • Drones and Robots
  • Linux in the Internet of Things
  • Practical Experiences and War Stories
  • Standards
  • Public Infrastructure
  • Industrial Automation

This year’s tracks and content will cover the following areas at ELC:

Suggested OpenIoT Summit Topics:

  • Real-Time OS (Zephyr, RIOT, MyNewt, FreeRTOS, NuttX, mbed and Others)
  • Outside World Meets IoT (Sensor Interaction,  Low Footprint, Connected Sensors, EMF/RFI Impact)
  • Bootloaders, Firmware & Updates
  • Containers
  • Distributed Edge
  • Application Technologies
  • On-device Analytics
  • Blockchain for Constrained Devices
  • Device Management
  • Power Management
  • Configuration Management
  • Developing for Security
  • Safety Considerations
  • Certifications – Lessons Learned Taking Devices to Product

View the full list of suggested topics for ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe.

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Not submitting, but plan to attend? Register before August 18 and save $300 with early bird pricing. One registration gets you access to both Open Source Summit Europe & ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe.

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Mercedes-Benz Vans develops new onboard operating system using AGL; Toyota continues to roll-out AGL-based infotainment system to new vehicle models

TOKYO – Automotive Linux Summit, June 20, 2018Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open platform for the connected car, today announced that Mercedes-Benz Vans is using AGL as a foundation for a new onboard operating system for its commercial vehicles.

“We are very excited to see members like Daimler using the AGL platform in new ways, such as developing new commercial solutions to solve challenges like last-mile logistics,” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at The Linux Foundation. “It’s proof that we have built a robust platform that can enable new products and solutions to quickly be developed and brought to market.”

AGL is an open source project hosted by The Linux Foundation that is changing the way automotive manufacturers build software.  More than 125 members are working together to develop a common platform that can serve as the de facto industry standard. Sharing a single software platform across the industry reduces fragmentation and accelerates time-to-market by encouraging the growth of a global ecosystem of developers that can build a product once and have it work for multiple automakers.

Mercedes-Benz Vans Transforms the Future of Commercial Vehicles

With its future-oriented “adVANce” initiative, Mercedes-Benz Vans is evolving from a manufacturer of globally successful vans into a provider of holistic transport solutions. The adVANce initiative focuses on several fields of innovation: connectivity and IoT applications, innovative hardware solutions, new on-demand mobility and rental concepts and fleet management solutions for the transport of goods and passengers.

In order to bring these new commercial solutions to life, Mercedes-Benz Vans is developing a next-generation onboard operating system using Automotive Grade Linux (AGL). The open source AGL platform provides Mercedes-Benz Vans with the flexibility to rapidly create tailored solutions for customers, including adding and connecting any kind of IoT components to the vehicle, such as sensors, automation controls and actuators. The new AGL-based operating system will debut on various Mercedes-Benz Vans prototype projects later this year.

“It has become clear that fast innovation cycles and flexible software architecture are key for the successful development of business applications, which is why we are using AGL as a foundation for our new onboard operating system,” said Thomas Wurdig, Head of Onboard-System Architecture and IoT, Mercedes-Benz Vans. “Using a standardized, open operating system like AGL enables us to rapidly develop new commercial vehicle use cases such as robotic delivery, data analytics and prediction and automation technologies.”

AGL Continues to Roll out to New Toyota Vehicles across Japan and the United States

The first AGL-based infotainment system on the road was announced last year on the 2018 Toyota Camry in the United States. The system is now in vehicles globally including the 2018 Prius PHV in Japan and many of the updated vehicle models following the Camry in the United States.

“Adopting open source software and being actively involved in projects like AGL represents a significant part of our technology strategy,” said Keiji Yamamoto, Executive Vice President, Connected Company of Toyota Motor Corporation. “The flexibility of the AGL platform has allowed us to quickly roll-out our new infotainment system to multiple vehicle models across the world.”

About Automotive Grade Linux (AGL)

Automotive Grade Linux is a collaborative open source project that is bringing together automakers, suppliers and technology companies to accelerate the development and adoption of a fully open software stack for the connected car. With Linux at its core, AGL is developing an open platform from the ground up that can serve as the de facto industry standard to enable rapid development of new features and technologies. Although initially focused on In-Vehicle-Infotainment (IVI), AGL is the only organization addressing all software in the vehicle, including instrument cluster, heads up display, telematics, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) and autonomous driving. The AGL platform is available to all, and anyone can participate in its development. Learn more: https://www.automotivelinux.org/

Automotive Grade Linux is hosted at The Linux Foundation. Linux Foundation projects are independently funded software projects that harness the power of collaborative development to fuel innovation across industries and ecosystems.

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and industry adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

Additional Resources

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Inquiries

Emily Olin

Automotive Grade Linux

eolin@linuxfoundation.org

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