3MF Consortium joins Linux Foundation, announces new executive director as it moves from development to adoption

San Francisco, Calif., July 21, 2020 – The 3MF Consortium, the organization dedicated to advancing a universal specification for 3D printing, today announced it is becoming a Linux Foundation member and that HP’s Luis Baldez is its new Executive Director (ED). Baldez supersedes Microsoft’s Adrian Lannin, who has served as ED since the 3MF Consortium was founded in 2015. Among the original creators of the 3MF Consortium, Lannin will remain a strategic advisor to the group.

The 3MF Consortium is among the original members of the Joint Development Foundation (JDF), which became part of the Linux Foundation in recent years to enable smooth collaboration among open source software projects and open standards. 3MF will take advantage of the combined strengths of the Linux Foundation/JDF alliance to advance 3D printing specifications and formats. With the majority of the world’s largest players in the 3D printing industry, 3MF Consortium represents the core of the industry’s innovation in this area.

“The 3MF Consortium has done the important work to create an open standard for 3D printing. The time is now to drive the evolution of 3MF from development to adoption,” said Luis Baldez, executive director, 3MF Consortium. “We would not be where we are today without Adrian Lannin’s leadership and contributions, and we’re looking forward to his insights as our ongoing advisor.”

Baldez was recently elected Executive Director by the 3MF Consortium membership to expand upon the technical progress and success of the 3MF standard by building new functionalities for the standard through collaboration with Linux Foundation and JDF. Baldez is a 3D printing veteran with experience across new technology business development. It is this combination of expertise that makes him well-suited for the ED role at 3MF Consortium, where the focus is maturing from standards development to implementation and adoption. Baldez has also held R&D engineering leadership positions at other multinationals and startups.

“Luis is a longtime champion of open standards and is an expert in the 3D printing space,” said Alex Oster, chairman of the 3MF technical working group and director of additive manufacturing at Autodesk. “Luis’ leadership and our collaboration with Linux Foundation will accelerate our work on 3D printing and help us build an even more vibrant network of contributions.”

The 3MF Consortium has grown rapidly since its formation in 2015, garnering new member investments and adoption across the industry’s leaders in 3D printing. It is supported by 3D Systems, Autodesk, GE, HP, Materialise, Microsoft, nTopology, Stratasys, and Siemens among 16 companies and has been implemented in nearly 40 products across 22 companies. The 3MF specification is robust and includes six extensions that range from core and production to slice, material and property (including color), beam lattice and security. The Secure Content specification was recently released and establishes an underlying mechanism for payload encryption of sensitive 3D printed data based on modern web standards. For the detailed specifications for all extensions, please visit the 3MF Consortium github repository: https://github.com/3MFConsortium/

For more information about the 3MF Consortium, please visit: https://3mf.io/

About the 3MF Consortium
The 3MF Consortium is comprised of leading AM hardware and software companies driving the Industry 4.0 revolution. The consortium releases and maintains the 3MF specifications that allow design applications to send full-fidelity 3D models to a mix of other applications, platforms, services, and printers. For more information, please visit: https://3mf.io/.

About the Joint Development Foundation
Launched in 2015, the Joint Development Foundation (the Joint Development Foundation) is an independent non-profit organization that provides the corporate and legal infrastructure to enable groups to quickly establish and operate standards and source code development collaborations. More information about the Joint Development Foundation is available at http://www.jointdevelopment.org/.

About the Linux Foundation
Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users, and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit  linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

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Media Contact
Jennifer Cloer
jennifer@rethinkitmedia.com
503-867-2304

Project will build on growth to advance electronic design automation for engineers  

San Francisco, Calif., November 22, 2019 – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced that it will host KiCad, a free, open source software suite for Electronic Design Automation (EDA). The program facilitates the design of schematics for electronic circuits and their conversion to Printed Circuit Board (PCB) designs. Under the Linux Foundation, KiCad will expand its community and ensure long-term sustainability.

“KiCad is a set of applications used by engineers focused on board design,” said Michael Dolan, VP of Strategic Programs at the Linux Foundation. “It’s a professional and free piece of software that gives engineers the freedom to use the software anywhere and across any platform, not tying them to specific hardware architectures. Its progress in creating an integrated environment for schematic capture and PCB layout design has been massive and the Linux Foundation’s infrastructure and governance model will give it the required support to sustain that growth for the long term.”

“We’ve seen the program skyrocket in use over recent years, with some board vendors reporting more than 15 percent of new board orders designed using KiCad,” said Wayne Stambaugh, KiCad Project Lead. “To accommodate this rate of growth there was a need to re-evaluate our revenue support model to help us attract more people to the project. Under the Linux Foundation we will have increased flexibility to spend donations to help move the project forward as well as an increased exposure to potential new donors.”

This project is also participating in the CommunityBridge platform, created earlier this year by the Linux Foundation to empower open source developers – and the individuals and organizations who support them – to advance sustainability, security, and diversity in open source technology.

KiCad was launched in 1992 and today has corporate, community, and individual donors including Digi- Key, System76, AISLER and NextPCB, with many donating through CERN. The main tools that exist within the package are used to create schematics, printed circuit board layouts, spice simulations, bill of materials, artwork, Gerber files, and 3D views of the PCB and its components. KiCad is a cross platform tool, running on Windows, Linux, and Apple MacOS and is released under the open source GNU GPL.

For more information please visit http://www.kicad-pcb.org/ or KiCad blog, Facebook or Twitter pages.

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

 

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Media Contact
Beth Handoll
ReTHINKitMedia
beth@rethinkitmedia.com
+1 415 535 8658

Codasip and Munich University of Applied Science become members

SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 15, 2019 — CHIPS Alliance, the leading consortium advancing common, open hardware for interfaces, processors and systems, today announced Codasip GmbH and Munich University of Applied Science have joined the CHIPS Alliance. In addition, on November 14–15, CHIPS Alliance will be joining the university for a workshop on open source design verification.

CHIPS Alliance is a project hosted by the Linux Foundation to foster a collaborative environment to accelerate the creation and deployment of open SoCs, peripherals and software tools for use in mobile, computing, consumer electronics, and Internet of Things (IoT) applications. The CHIPS Alliance project develops high-quality open source Register Transfer Level (RTL) code relevant to the design of open source CPUs, RISC-V-based SoCs, and complex peripherals for Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) and custom silicon.

Codasip is a leading supplier of configurable RISC-V® embedded processor IP. Codasip provides a portfolio of various RISC-V implementations along with a suite of processor developers tools to allow for rapid core customization, and will contribute to working groups on verification platforms and open cores.

“Codasip has years of processor development experience and has shown its dedication to open platforms by its contributions to open source compiler and compliance projects. We welcome their participation in the CHIPS Alliance to facilitate the adoption of open architectures,” said Zvonimir Bandić, senior director of next-generation platforms architecture at Western Digital and Chairman, CHIPS Alliance.

“Codasip is excited to join the CHIPS Alliance and support the community in its efforts to ease the path of adoption of RISC-V processors in leading-edge SOC applications,” said Karel Masařík, CEO of Codasip. “The CHIPS Alliance is the logical next step in providing chip designers more choices when it comes to processor architectures.”

Munich University of Applied Sciences aims to secure an outstanding position as a university of applied sciences. It recognizes the future demands of society and industry, and is changing with a critical yet open vision for current issues, such as the ongoing digitalization of all areas of life. The university focuses on continuous improvement of quality and on constant development in research, teaching, and continuing education.

“We strongly believe in open source silicon and design flows,” said Stefan Wallentowitz, professor for computer architecture at MUAS. “We look forward to improving open source verification tools together with innovative companies in that field.”

In cooperation with Munich University of Applied Science, the CHIPS Alliance is conducting an open source design verification workshop in Munich. The workshop invites contributions from industry, academia and hobbyists as talks or tutorials. Registration is open now for the November 14–15 event.

About Codasip

Codasip delivers leading-edge processor IP and high-level design tools, providing ASIC designers with all the advantages of the RISC-V open ISA, along with the unique ability to automatically optimize the processor IP. As a founding member of the RISC-V Foundation and a long-term supplier of LLVM and GNU-based processor solutions, Codasip is committed to open standards for embedded processors. Formed in 2006 and headquartered in Munich, Germany, Codasip currently has offices in the US and Europe, with representatives in Asia and Israel. For more information about our products and services, visit www.codasip.com.

About the CHIPS Alliance

The CHIPS Alliance is an organization which develops and hosts high-quality, open source hardware code (IP cores), interconnect IP (physical and logical protocols), and open source software development tools for design, verification, and more. The main aim is to provide a barrier-free collaborative environment, to lower the cost of developing IP and tools for hardware development. The CHIPS Alliance is hosted by the Linux Foundation. For more information, visit chipsalliance.org.

About the Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation was founded in 2000 and has since become the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Today, the Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and its projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure, including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js and more. The Linux Foundation focuses on employing best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users, and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, visit linuxfoundation.org.

Live from Open Source Summit this week, we’re thrilled to share that the OpenPOWER Foundation is becoming a project hosted at The Linux Foundation. This includes a technical contribution of the POWER Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) and Source Design Implementations, including a softcore implementation of the POWER ISA.

The OpenPOWER Foundation recognizes how increased collaboration across the open source ecosystem will advance open hardware technology and accelerate opportunity.

Six years ago, IBM setup the OpenPOWER Foundation to widen the reach of their POWER technology. The goal from the start was to support Instruction Set Architecture and contributed Source Design Implementations required for data-driven HPC workloads like modelling and simulation, cloud services and also Artificial Intelligence (AI). 

Today, with 350+ members, OpenPOWER focuses on both hardware and software technologies, providing industry specifications across the open ecosystem, helping members collaborate, as well as providing training and promotion of a POWER architecture. Under The Linux Foundation OpenPOWER’s efforts will increase the  breadth and depth of data-driven architectures for developers across the industry and globe and execute on a standard open governance model. 

So what exactly will this mean for the developers and engineers working within the stacks?  With an open infrastructure from the hardware components to firmware to the operating system and the solutions running on top, developers can now access reviews and improvements to any element in the stack, at any time.  Being able to engage globally with developers, engineers and decision makers will fundamentally shape the future of open hardware technologies and help enterprises see faster applications and cheaper cloud services.

This news is a huge deal. What’s so exciting is that it impacts the entire stack and it mirrors The Linux Foundation’s original mission – to bring open hardware, open standards and open code to developers. With this will come so much innovation from the top all the way down the stack and we’re excited to see how this will revolutionize experiences for customers in hybrid cloud architectures and AI environments. 

Check out more details on the news from today’s keynote and our official release here: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/press-release/2019/08/the-linux-foundation-announces-new-open-hardware-technologies-and-collaboration/

OpenPOWER to become Linux Foundation project to advance development of data-driven architectures required for hybrid cloud environments and increasingly intensive workloads

SAN DIEGO, CA August 21, 2019 – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced that the OpenPOWER Foundation will become a project hosted at The Linux Foundation. The project includes IBM’s open POWER Instruction Set Architecture (ISA) and contributed Source Design Implementations required to support data-driven hardware for intensive workloads like Artificial Intelligence (AI).

OpenPOWER is the open steward for the Power Architecture and has the support of 350 members, including IBM, Google, Inspur Power Systems, Yadro, Hitachi, Wistron, Mellanox, NVIDIA, and Red Hat.

The governance model within the Linux Foundation gives software developers assurance of compatibility while developing AI and hybrid cloud native applications that take advantage of POWER’s rich feature set and open compute hardware and software ecosystems.

As the demand rises for more and more compute-intensive workloads like AI and in-memory analytics, commodity systems vendors have struggled with the looming predictions of the end of Moore’s Law. Central processing units (CPUs) may no longer handle the rising demands alone, and data-centric systems are built to maximize the flow of data between CPUs and attached devices for specialized workloads. By hosting OpenPOWER at The Linux Foundation, a cross-project, cross-community collaboration, it will accelerate development of hardware and software to support data-centric systems, by making it available to a growing global audience.

“The OpenPOWER community has been doing critical work to support the increasing demands of enterprises that are using big data for AI and machine learning workloads. The move to bring these efforts together with the worldwide ecosystem of open source developers across projects at The Linux Foundation will unleash a new level of innovation by giving developers everywhere more access to the tools and technologies that will define the next generation of POWER architecture,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director at The Linux Foundation.

“IBM believes that open collaboration through groups like Linux Foundation is key to delivering value for our clients,” said IBM’s OpenPOWER General Manager Ken King. “With our recent Red Hat acquisition and today’s announcement, IBM becomes the only commercially-available processor vendor and POWER becomes the only architecture that can boast of a completely open system stack, from the foundation of the hardware through the software stack.”

“The OpenPOWER Foundation was created in 2013 to promote open standards and specifications of systems designed around the IBM POWER architecture,” said Hugh Blemings, Executive Director, OpenPOWER Foundation. “Since then, hundreds of companies from around the world have contributed to the framework and collaborated with each other to build technology for the benefit of their customers. Collaborating with The Linux Foundation marks the next step in opening up the community further.”

To find more information on the OpenPOWER Foundation or get involved in the project, please visit:  The Linux Foundation Blog, IBM Blog, OpenPOWER blog.

About the Linux Foundation
The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and industry adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Contact:
Beth Handoll
reTHINKit Media
415-535-8658
beth@rethinkitmedia.com

Antmicro Joins CHIPS Alliance to develop open source cores, IP blocks and tools for CPUs, RISC-V-based SoCs and peripherals

SAN FRANCISCO –  April 18, 2019 – CHIPS Alliance, the leading consortium advancing common, open hardware for interfaces, processors and systems, today announced Antmicro is joining the organization. Antmicro is a software-driven technology company focused on introducing open source into strategic areas of industry, especially edge AI. Announced just last month, the CHIPS Alliance welcomes Antmicro among its initial members Esperanto Technologies, Google, SiFive, and Western Digital.

CHIPS Alliance is a project hosted by the Linux Foundation to foster a collaborative environment to accelerate the creation and deployment of more efficient and flexible CPUs, SoCs, and peripherals for use in mobile, computing, consumer electronics, and Internet of Things (IoT) applications. The CHIPS Alliance project hosts and curates high-quality open source Register Transfer Level (RTL) code relevant to the design of open source CPUs, RISC-V-based SoCs, and complex peripherals for Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) and custom silicon. Members are committed to both open source hardware and continued momentum behind the free and open RISC-V architecture.  

“The RISC-V Foundation directs the standards and promotes the adoption of the open and free Instruction Set Architecture. This enables organizations to innovate for the next generation of hardware development. CHIPS Alliance is a natural extension for companies and universities who want to collaborate and create RTL based on RISC-V and related peripherals,” said Calista Redmond, CEO of the RISC-V Foundation.

“Antmicro believes in open source collaboration around portable, extendible and vendor-neutral technologies, which we consider a strong foundation for transparent, shared development processes based on good practices. We’re joining CHIPS Alliance because it is the conduit through which we can all realize the vision of open source RTL designs for silicon and FPGAs,” said Peter Gielda, CEO of Antmicro.  

The CHIPS Alliance community includes technology developers and contributors supported by a Board of Directors and a Technical Steering Committee. Its initial plans focus on establishing a curation process aimed at providing the FPGA and chip community access to high-quality, enterprise grade hardware.

About Antmicro

Antmicro (www.antmicro.com) is a software-driven tech company developing advanced open source-based cyber-physical and edge AI systems. Antmicro provides open software, hardware, tooling, new development methodologies and applied R&D to customers worldwide, accelerating new product development and adoption of modern computing platforms, both CPU/ASIC, GPU and FPGA-based. A Platinum Founding Member of the RISC-V Foundation, Antmicro supports, uses, contributes to and helps promote a broad range of open source technologies such as RISC‑V, Renode, Tensorflow, Zephyr, Linux and Android.

About The Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure, including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users, and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of the Linux Foundation, please visit our trademark usage page at https://www.linuxfoundaton.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

MEDIA CONTACTS

Jill Lovato

The Linux Foundation

jlovato@linuxfoundation.org

New Linux Foundation Project to Foster Flexible, Next-Generation Chip Design for Diverse Data-Centric Applications and Workloads

SAN FRANCISCO –  March 11, 2019 – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced its intent to form the CHIPS Alliance project to host and curate high-quality open source code relevant to the design of silicon devices. CHIPS Alliance will foster a collaborative environment that will enable accelerated creation and deployment of more efficient and flexible chip designs for use in mobile, computing, consumer electronics, and Internet of Things (IoT) applications.

Early CHIPS Alliance backers include Esperanto Technologies, Google, SiFive and Western Digital, all committed to both open source hardware and continued momentum behind the free and open RISC-V architecture.

“The RISC-V community is working to foster open source foundation technologies that will help unlock market innovation to move [artificial intelligence/machine learning and infrastructure composability] forward,” said Eric Burgener, research vice president of IDC’s Infrastructure Systems, Platforms, and Technologies Group, via a recent IDC report.

The project will create an independent entity so companies and individuals can collaborate and contribute resources to make open source CPU chip and system-on-a-chip (SoC) design more accessible to the market.

“Open collaboration has repeatedly proven to help industries accelerate time to market, achieve long-term maintainability, and create de facto standards,” said Mike Dolan, vice president of strategic programs, the Linux Foundation. “The same collaboration model applies to the hardware in a system, just as it does to software components. We are eager to host the CHIPS Alliance and invite more organizations to join the initiative to help propel collaborative innovation within the CPU and SoC markets.”  

“As new workloads surface every day, we need new silicon designs in order to optimize processing requirements,” said Martin Fink, interim CEO of RISC-V Foundation and executive vice president and CTO of Western Digital. “Today’s legacy general-purpose architectures are, in some cases, decades old.  With the creation of the CHIPS Alliance, we are expecting to fast-track silicon innovation through the open source community.”

CHIPS Alliance will follow governance practices consistent with other Linux Foundation projects, which will include a Board of Directors, a Technical Steering Committee, and community contributors who will work collectively to manage the project. Initial plans will focus on establishing a curation process aimed at providing the chip community with access to high-quality, enterprise grade hardware.

PLANNED CONTRIBUTIONS

Google
Google is planning to contribute a Universal Verification Methodology (UVM)-based instruction stream generator environment for RISC-V cores. The environment provides configurable, highly stressful instruction sequences that can verify architectural and micro-architectural corner-cases of designs.

SiFive
SiFive was founded by the inventors of the free and open RISC-V Instruction Set Architecture, who, together with their colleagues at UC Berkeley, developed the first opensource RISC-V microprocessors and a new opensource hardware description language Chisel. This initial work at UC Berkeley also developed the RocketChip SoC generator, including the initial version of the TileLink coherent interconnect fabric.

SiFive remains committed to maintaining and improving the RocketChip SoC generator and the TileLink interconnect fabric in opensource as a member of the CHIPS Alliance, and contributing to Chisel and the FIRRTL intermediate representation specification and transformation toolkit. SiFive will also contribute and maintain Diplomacy, the SoC parameter negotiation framework.

Western Digital
Western Digital is planning to contribute their high performance, 9-stage, dual issue, 32-bit SweRV Core, together with a test bench, and high-performance SweRV Instruction set simulator. Additional contribution will be specification and early implementations of OmniXtend cache coherence protocol.

To learn more about CHIPS Alliance, please visit www.chipsalliance.org.

SUPPORTING QUOTES

Esperanto Technologies
“Intellectual property for VLSI chip designs ought to be able to reap similar benefits as open source software has for years. We hope that the CHIPS Alliance will be a catalyst where all hardware designers feel comfortable both contributing and finding useful designs for their projects,” said Dave Ditzel, founder and CEO of Esperanto Technologies, Inc.

Google
“We are entering a new golden age of computer architecture highlighted by accelerators, rapid hardware development and open source architecture and implementations. Google is committed to fostering an open community of collaboration and innovation in both hardware and software,” said Dr. Amir Salek, senior director, Technical Infrastructure, Google Cloud. “CHIPS Alliance will provide the support and framework needed to nurture a vibrant open source hardware ecosystem for high-quality, well-verified and documented components to accelerate and simplify chip design.”

SiFive
“Semiconductor design starts have evaporated due to the skyrocketing cost of building a custom SoC,” said Dr. Yunsup Lee, co-founder and CTO, SiFive. “A healthy, vibrant semiconductor industry needs a significant number of design starts, and the CHIPS Alliance will fill this need. SiFive is excited to continue to work on and contribute to the RocketChip SoC generator, TileLink, Chisel, and FIRRTL projects as we push the boundaries of open source innovation.”  

Western Digital
“The data-centric universe continues to grow and expand in ways many of us never imagined,” said Dr. Zvonimir Bandic, senior director of next-generation platforms architecture at Western Digital, a co-founder of RISC-V as well as CHIPS Alliance. “The CHIPS Alliance will provide access to an open source silicon solution that can democratize key memory and storage interfaces and enable revolutionary new data-centric architectures. It paves the way for a new generation of compute devices and intelligent accelerators that are close to the memory and can transform how data is moved, shared, and consumed across a wide range of applications. By extending Western Digital’s commitment to the RISC-V architecture and instruction set, and teaming up with fellow industry leaders to form the CHIPS Alliance, we make another important stride forward toward unlocking the true potential of the data.”

About the Linux Foundation
Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

RISC-V Foundation to leverage the Linux Foundation’s tools infrastructure, services and training programs

SAN FRANCISCO and BERKELEY, CA – Nov. 27, 2018 –The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, and the RISC-V Foundation, a non-profit corporation controlled by its members to drive the adoption and implementation of the free and open RISC-V instruction set architecture (ISA), today announced a joint collaboration agreement to accelerate open source development and adoption of the RISC-V ISA.

The RISC-V Foundation includes over 210 institutional, academic and individual members from around the world and has realized 100 percent year-over-year membership growth. This partnership with the Linux Foundation will enable the RISC-V Foundation to grow the RISC-V ecosystem with improved support for the development of new applications and architectures across all computing platforms.

“With the rapid international adoption of the RISC-V ISA, we need increased scale and resources to support the explosive growth of the RISC-V ecosystem. The Linux Foundation is an ideal partner given the open source nature of both organizations,” said Rick O’Connor, executive director of the non-profit RISC-V Foundation. “This joint collaboration with the Linux Foundation will enable the RISC-V Foundation to offer more robust support and educational tools for the active RISC-V community, and enable operating systems, hardware implementations and development tools to scale faster.”

“RISC-V has great traction in a number of markets with applications for AI, machine learning, IoT, augmented reality, cloud, data centers, semiconductors, networking and more.  RISC-V is a technology that has the potential to greatly advance open hardware architecture,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director at the Linux Foundation. “We look forward to collaborating with the RISC-V Foundation to advance RISC-V ISA adoption and build a strong ecosystem globally.”

Since its inception in 2015, RISC-V has quickly evolved its ecosystem to feature leading technology companies and emerging startups all working together to enable a wide range of open-source and proprietary RISC-V hardware and software solutions. Members are solving some of today’s most complex design challenges including security, performance, power, efficiency, flexibility and more.

In addition to neutral governance and best practices for open source development, The Linux Foundation will also provide an influx of resources for the RISC-V ecosystem, such as training programs, infrastructure tools, as well as community outreach, marketing and legal expertise.

The RISC-V ISA offers a number of advantages over other architectures, including its openness, simplicity, clean-slate design, modularity, extensibility and stability, delivering a new level of software and hardware freedom on architecture.

The Linux Foundation and the RISC-V communities are already collaborating on a pair of “Getting Started” guides for running the Zephyr, a small, scalable open source RTOS for connected, resource constrained devices, and Linux operating systems on RISC-V based platforms. The Zephyr and Linux guides will be unveiled at the RISC-V Summit on Dec. 3, 2018, in Santa Clara during training classes led by project contributors from RISC-V Foundation Founding Platinum Members Antmicro, Google, Microchip Technology and Western Digital, in addition to the Linux Foundation. For further details regarding the RISC-V Summit, please visit https://tmt.knect365.com/risc-v-summit/.

About RISC-V Foundation

RISC-V (pronounced “risk-five”) is a free and open ISA enabling a new era of processor innovation through open standard collaboration. Founded in 2015, the RISC-V Foundation comprises more than 200 members building the first open, collaborative community of software and hardware innovators powering a new era of processor innovation. Born in academia and research, RISC-V ISA delivers a new level of free, extensible software and hardware freedom on architecture, paving the way for the next 50 years of computing design and innovation.

The RISC-V Foundation, a non-profit corporation controlled by its members, directs the future development and drives the adoption of the RISC-V ISA. Members of the RISC-V Foundation have access to and participate in the development of the RISC-V ISA specifications and related HW / SW ecosystem. More information can be found at www.riscv.org.

About the Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and industry adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.