Posts

German Autolabs, KPIT, MontaVista, OTAinfo, OUTCERT, and Ovo also join AGL

SAN FRANCISCO, October 10, 2019 — Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open source platform for connected car technologies, announces seven new members. SAIC Motor has joined as a Silver member, and German Autolabs, KPIT, MontaVista, OTAinfo, OUTCERT, and Ovo Automotive join as Bronze members.

“We are excited to welcome SAIC Motor as our first car manufacturer from China. This will allow us to expand our global ecosystem into the Chinese and Asian markets” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at the Linux Foundation. “AGL now has the support of 11 automakers which account for approximately sixty percent of worldwide annual vehicle shipments. We look forward to working with SAIC and all of our other new members as we continue to expand the AGL platform to support new mobility solutions and connected car applications.”

AGL is an open source project at the Linux Foundation that is bringing together automakers, suppliers and technology companies to accelerate the development and adoption of a fully open, shared software platform for all technology in the vehicle, from infotainment to autonomous driving. Sharing a single software platform across the industry reduces fragmentation and accelerates time-to-market by encouraging the growth of a global ecosystem of developers and application providers that can build a product once and have it work for multiple automakers.

Automotive Grade Linux members will come together for the bi-annual AGL All Member Meeting on October 22-23, 2019, in Monte Carlo, Monaco to learn about the latest developments, share best practices and collaborate to drive rapid innovation across the industry. The meeting is open to all current AGL members. Details and registration information can be found here

New Member Quotes: 

German Autolabs
“German Autolabs is a pioneer in Automotive Voice Assistance,” said Holger G. Weiss, co-founder and CEO of German Autolabs. “Our full-stack conversational assistance solution is fully offline-capable and provides customizable white-label VPA technology solutions for Automotive OEM and fleet operators. Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) as a standardized operating system provides a reliable and customer agnostic framework for our embedded stack. We plan to contribute to Speech, Connectivity, Navi and UI/Graphics expert groups.”

KPIT
“We believe in Reimagining Mobility for creating a cleaner, smarter & safer world, and connected vehicles play a central role in our vision,” said Anup Sable, CTO, KPIT Technologies Ltd. “We have been working closely with several carmakers over the last decade, and our Linux based infotainment platform is part of millions of vehicles. We are proud to be part of the AGL community and the Linux Foundation, where we can contribute our expertise in infotainment, Linux, cybersecurity, clusters and connectivity.”

MontaVista
“MontaVista Software is the worldwide leader in developing, deploying and supporting commercial and industrial embedded Linux solutions and services, and we are excited about joining the AGL Community,” states Ravi Gupta, MontaVista Software’s CEO. “As the next generation vehicles become more software oriented, ensuring the quality and reliability of that software is absolutely critical to the safety and security of transportation for decades to come. Our goal is to contribute to the AGL Community in developing new features and technologies, and as well as the long term support strategy for these complex systems.”

OUTCERT
“We built a technology education platform whose foundations rely on collaboration with organizations in a very broad spectrum. Linux and Open Source technologies have disrupted each and every segment covered in that spectrum,” said Lital Shoshan Idel, CEO at OUTCERT. “We foresee significant upskilling in the automotive workforce as it embraces rapid adoption of emerging technologies.”

Ovo Automotive
“Ovo delivers virtualized Android apps to connected vehicles directly from the cloud, providing OEMs, dealers, and fleet owners full control over the screens of their vehicles by choosing the Android apps to run,” said Dr. Gilad Zlotkin, CEO and Co-founder at Ovo Automotive. “We believe that openness is one of the greatest drivers of innovation and we see value in bringing the Android apps ecosystem into AGL. Being a proactive member of Automotive Grade Linux will enable us to better serve our clients.”

SAIC
“In recent years, SAIC aims at the new trend of the development of the automobile industry — electrification, intelligent network connection, sharing and internationalization. In the future, SAIC will take intelligent network-based cars, smart travel solutions and intelligent manufacturing as an important starting point to explore and practice the broader and deeper integration of big data, cloud computing and artificial intelligence with the automobile industry, and contribute to the acceleration of transformation and upgrading of China’s automobile industry,” said Chen Hong, CEO of SAIC MOTOR. “Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is the only organization addressing all software in the car, including Infotainment, Instrument Cluster, HUD, ADAS, Function safety and Autonomous Driving, which will help us to achieve the goal promptly.”

###

About Automotive Grade Linux (AGL)
Automotive Grade Linux is a collaborative open source project that is bringing together automakers, suppliers and technology companies to accelerate the development and adoption of a fully open software stack for the connected car. With Linux at its core, AGL is developing an open platform from the ground up that can serve as the de facto industry standard to enable rapid development of new features and technologies. Although initially focused on In-Vehicle-Infotainment (IVI), AGL is the only organization planning to address all software in the vehicle, including instrument cluster, heads up display, telematics, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) and autonomous driving. The AGL platform is available to all, and anyone can participate in its development. Automotive Grade Linux is hosted at the Linux Foundation. Learn more at automotivelinux.org.

Media Inquiries
Emily Olin
Automotive Grade Linux
eolin@linuxfoundation.org

SAN FRANCISCO, CA, Aug 22, 2019 — Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), an open source project developing a shared software platform for in-vehicle technology, today announced a new working group focused on Instrument Cluster solutions, as well as the latest code release of the AGL platform, the UCB 8.0.

The AGL Instrument Cluster Expert Group (EG) is working to reduce the footprint of AGL and optimize the platform for use in lower performance processors and low-cost vehicles that do not require an entire infotainment software stack. Formed earlier this year, the group plans to release design specifications later this year with an initial code release in early 2020.

AGL is now supported by nine major automotive manufacturers, including the top three producers by worldwide volume, and is currently being used in production for a range of economy and luxury vehicles” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at the Linux Foundation. “The new Instrument Cluster Expert Group, supported by several of these automakers, will expand the use cases for AGL by enabling the UCB platform to support solutions for lower-cost vehicles, including motorcycles.” 

Unified Code Base 8.0
AGL is also announcing the latest UCB 8.0 code release. Developed through a joint effort by AGL member companies, the AGL Unified Code Base (UCB) is an open source software platform that can serve as the de facto industry standard for infotainment, telematics and instrument cluster applications. 

The AGL UCB 8.0, nicknamed “Happy Halibut,” includes an operating system, middleware and application framework. New updates to the platform include:

  • Device profiles for telematics and instrument cluster
  • Telematics Profile and demo available 
  • Web App Manager (WAM) enhancements
  • Upgrade to Yocto version 2.6 
  • Speech integration with Alexa Voice Agent
  • Multi-user security rules for the AGL Application Framework
  • Waltham transmitter and receiver now fully available in IVI and Instrument Cluster profiles
  • Window Manager and Home Screen Services – Window Manager and Compositor consolidation, Activity Manager, Input Manager
  • Audio Policy Manager
  • Pipewire as default audio build option
  • Writing to CAN bus fully supported and secured
  • Extensive Board Support Packages for major automotive reference hardware boards 
  • Task manager application now available as an installable widget

The full list of additions to the UCB 8.0 can be found here.

###

About Automotive Grade Linux (AGL)
Automotive Grade Linux is a collaborative open source project that is bringing together automakers, suppliers and technology companies to accelerate the development and adoption of a fully open software stack for the connected car. With Linux at its core, AGL is developing an open platform from the ground up that can serve as the de facto industry standard to enable rapid development of new features and technologies. Although initially focused on In-Vehicle-Infotainment (IVI), AGL is the only organization planning to address all software in the vehicle, including instrument cluster, heads up display, telematics, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) and autonomous driving. The AGL platform is available to all, and anyone can participate in its development. Automotive Grade Linux is hosted at the Linux Foundation. Learn more at automotivelinux.org.

Media Inquiries
Emily Olin
Automotive Grade Linux, the Linux Foundation
eolin@linuxfoundation.org

 

Volkswagen Joins Automotive Grade Linux and the Linux Foundation
to Accelerate Open Source Innovation and Shared Software Development

Leading German automaker continues its transformation from automobile manufacturer to mobility provider
by investing in open source and shared development of automotive software

SAN FRANCISCO, April 8, 2019 — Automotive Grade Linux, a collaborative cross-industry effort developing an open source platform for connected car technologies, has announced that Volkswagen has joined Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) and the Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source.

AGL is an open source project at the Linux Foundation that is changing the way automotive manufacturers build software. More than 130 members are working together to develop a common platform that can serve as the de facto industry standard for infotainment, telematics and instrument cluster applications. Adopting an open platform across the industry enables automakers and suppliers to share and reuse the same code base, which reduces development costs, decreases time-to-market for new products and reduces fragmentation across the industry.

“The automotive industry is undergoing a digital transformation, and automakers and their suppliers are increasingly adopting open source solutions, like the AGL platform, to drive rapid innovation and enable them to bring products to market faster,” said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at the Linux Foundation. “We are very excited to welcome Volkswagen to the AGL community, and we look forward to leveraging the technological expertise of their developers and engineers as we continue to enhance the AGL platform and develop new functionalities.”

In 2008, Volkswagen contributed the Controller Area Network (CAN) bus networking subsystem to the Linux Kernel 2.6.25, which paved the way for a standardized socket API for developers and a common CAN network driver model for SoCs and PC-style CAN hardware. Within this contribution process, Volkswagen and non-automotive CAN users learned a lot from each other’s use-cases so that the Linux CAN support is now widely used in industrial, automotive and academic setups (e.g. CERN).

“The Open Source approach provides excellent software solutions that are suitable to enable a long-term support of software over the vehicle life cycle,” says Oliver Hartkopp, Open Source specialist at Volkswagen. “To ensure robust and secure solutions for our customers we want to be in close connection with the community to be able to directly interact with developers and maintainers.”

Working with communities and providing knowledge, ideas and source code requires a new mindset in the automotive industry. Volkswagen is joining AGL to become a member of the development community for the common automotive Linux platform.

Developed through a joint effort by dozens of member companies, the AGL Unified Code Base (UCB) platform is an open source software platform for infotainment, telematics and instrument cluster applications. It provides 70% of the starting point for a production project and includes an operating system, middleware and application framework. Automakers and suppliers can customize the platform with features, services and branding to meet their unique product and customer needs.

About Automotive Grade Linux (AGL)
Automotive Grade Linux is a collaborative open source project that is bringing together automakers, suppliers and technology companies to accelerate the development and adoption of a fully open software stack for the connected car. With Linux at its core, AGL is developing an open platform from the ground up that can serve as the de facto industry standard to enable rapid development of new features and technologies. Although initially focused on In-Vehicle-Infotainment (IVI), AGL is the only organization planning to address all software in the vehicle, including instrument cluster, heads up display, telematics, advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) and autonomous driving. The AGL platform is available to all, and anyone can participate in its development. Learn more: https://www.automotivelinux.org/

Automotive Grade Linux is a Collaborative Project at The Linux Foundation. Linux Foundation Collaborative Projects are independently funded software projects that harness the power of collaborative development to fuel innovation across industries and ecosystems.

Additional Resources

About the Linux Foundation
Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users, and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

###

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Inquiries
Emily Olin
Automotive Grade Linux
eolin@linuxfoundation.org

Arm, BMW Car IT GmbH, KUKA, Linutronix, and Toyota join ELISA project to advance open source functional safety across transportation, manufacturing, healthcare, and energy industries

SAN FRANCISCO, February 21, 2019 – The Linux Foundation today launched the Enabling Linux in Safety Applications (ELISA) open source project to create a shared set of tools and processes to help companies build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications and systems whose failure could result in loss of human life, significant property damage or environmental damage. Building off the work being done by SIL2LinuxMP project and Real-Time Linux project, ELISA will make it easier for companies to build safety-critical systems such as robotic devices, medical devices, smart factories, transportation systems and autonomous driving using Linux. Founding members of ELISA include Arm, BMW Car IT GmbH, KUKA, Linutronix, and Toyota.

To be trusted, safety-critical systems must meet functional safety objectives for the overall safety of the system, including how it responds to actions such as user errors, hardware failures, and environmental changes. Companies must demonstrate that their software meets strict demands for reliability, quality assurance, risk management, development process, and documentation. Because there is no clear method for certifying Linux, it can be difficult for a company to demonstrate that their Linux-based system meets these safety objectives.

“All major industries, including energy, medical and automotive, want to use Linux for safety-critical applications because it can enable them to bring products to market faster and reduce the risk of critical design errors. The challenge has been the lack of the clear documentation and tools needed to demonstrate that a Linux-based system meets the necessary safety requirements for certification,” said Kate Stewart, Senior Director of Strategic Programs at The Linux Foundation. “Past attempts at solving this have lacked the critical mass needed to establish a widely discussed and accepted methodology, but with the formation of ELISA, we will be able to leverage the infrastructure and support of the broader Linux Foundation community that is needed to make this initiative successful.”

ELISA will work with certification authorities and standardization bodies in multiple industries to establish how Linux can be used as a component in safety-critical systems. The project will also define and maintain a common set of elements, processes and tools that can be incorporated into Linux-based, safety-critical systems amenable to safety certification.

Additional project goals include:

  • Develop reference documentation and use cases.
  • Educate the open source community on safety engineering best practices and educate the safety community on open source concepts.
  • Enable continuous feedback with the open source community to improve processes, and to automate quality assessment and assurance.
  • Support members with incident and hazard monitoring of critical components relevant to their systems and establish best practices for member response teams.

For more information about ELISA, visit elisa.tech.

Industry Support for ELISA

“The safe and effective performance of safety-related software is essential as we increasingly rely on programmable devices in our homes, workplaces and communities at-large. UL looks forward to the launch of ELISA and the opportunity it presents to more rapidly assess and validate – with confidence – the Linux component of safety systems.”
– Tom Blewitt, VP & CTO, UL

“The Open Source Automation Development Lab (OSADL) was founded more than 13 years ago to advance the use of GNU/Linux in industrial products by addressing the need for real-time capabilities and safety certification. Shortly after, we here at OSADL created the OSADL Safety  Critical Linux Working Group for functional safety, which culminated in the SIL2LinuxMP project that laid some groundwork for using GNU/Linux in safety-related systems. We subsequently added legal support and many other services that are needed to successfully use Open Source software in industry to our portfolio. We still continue to foster real-time Linux, among other, as a Gold member of the Linux Foundation’s Real-Time Linux project, and we are proud to see some of the efforts of the SIL2LinuxMP project continued at a larger scale in the ELISA project.”
– Dr. Carsten Emde, General Manager, OSADL

“At Automotive Grade Linux, we are working closely with the Real-Time Linux project and the ELISA project in order to achieve functional safety certifications for automotive applications such as our instrument cluster, heads-up-display and ADAS solutions. By working closely with ELISA, this will help us provide automotive manufacturers with all of the testing artifacts and documentation they need to achieve safety certification for their AGL-based systems.” –
– Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at the Linux Foundation

“Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) Project is committed to improving implementation of Linux-based civil infrastructure systems through industrial grade software and a universal operating system that is maintained for more than ten years. We work closely with several open source project such as Real-Time Linux, Linux Kernel LTS and KernelCI to achieve Long Term Support (LTS) and safety and security certifications. We support the ELISA Project and its efforts to build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications on a broader scale.”
– Urs Gleim, Governing Board Chair of the Civil Infrastructure Platform, hosted at the Linux Foundation

ELISA Founding Members
Founding members of ELISA include Arm, BMW Car IT GmbH, KUKA, Linutronix, and Toyota.

Arm
“Safety and trust are the highest priorities for the automotive industry as vehicles become more autonomous and Arm’s Automotive Enhanced technologies are at the heart of systems powering these vehicles. The work the Linux Foundation is undertaking with the ELISA project complements Arm’s functional safety leadership and continued commitment to software enablement.”
– Lakshmi Mandyam, VP automotive, Automotive and IoT Line of Business, Arm

KUKA
“KUKA is looking forward to working with other Linux experts in order to define a series of methods and processes, with the goal of certifying Linux-based safety-critical systems.”
– David Fuller, CTO, KUKA AG

Linutronix
“We are happy to see that the SIL2Linux work will continue and advance with the launch of ELISA and provide a clear focus for the use of Linux in safety critical applications. ELISA will help to establish Linux in the industrial control world deeper than ever before.”
– Heinz Egger, CEO, Linutronix

Toyota
“Open source software has become a significant part of our technology strategy, and we want to help make it easier to use Linux-based applications. Toyota believes the ELISA project will support CASE use cases in an innovative way for the automotive industry.”
– Mr. Masato Hashimoto, General Manager of E/E Architecture Development Div., Advanced R&D and Engineering Company, Toyota

About The Linux Foundation
The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and industry adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

# # #

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Inquiries
Emily Olin
The Linux Foundation
eolin@linuxfoundation.org

Xen hypervisor

When it comes to automotive software, there are three key things to think about: safety, safety and safety.

Open source moves into most industries in the same way. First, it is seen as unimportant, then too risky, and suddenly, it becomes essential.

Just think about some of the fundamental building blocks of the connected economy – Linux, HTTP, SSL, Apache Web Servers and so much more. Each of these major open source platforms were combined and refined by many companies to provide a business platform, leading to billions upon billions of dollars in growth. Banking, Commerce, Media, Agriculture, Energy and other massive industry sectors are wholly dependent on the widespread use of open source software to function.

Of course, each industry is different and faces its own set of unique challenges and requirements. In particular, the automotive industry is rightfully cautious about all software, not just open source. However, the industry has come to trust proven platforms that have shown results over time, rather than novel capabilities.

Xen Hypervisor

So, it is no surprise that the open source Xen Hypervisor is quickly moving to the forefront of open source technology for automotive. With a history that stretches back to the late 1990s, Xen is one of the oldest “new” technologies around. Starting as a research project at Cambridge University, Xen was first made open source in 2002 and then became deeply integrated into major Linux distributions in 2011.

When it comes to automotive software, there are three key things to think about: safety, safety and safety. Stability and maturity matter in automotive software. This is where the combination of Xen maturity, 14 years and counting, running in major data centers around the globe, and open source software development have come together to ensure a stable base for new innovations in connected vehicles.

Then there is the basic architecture of the open source Xen Hypervisor. No one wants anything interfering with mission-critical functions. If businesses don’t want to allow software to communicate with hardware, then take out the hardware drivers as driver disaggregation is a basic concept of Xen.

Additionally, there’s the matter of ensuring that the code itself is manageable and does not consume too many system resources. Computers in vehicles are not particularly powerful and their local storage capacity is limited, which can be challenging. However, refining the open source code to the “essentials” is not only possible, it is a best practice. Consider that Xen is about 90K lines of code. It’s small enough to manage and consumes very little computing power, which is a huge benefit for any embedded engineering project with constrained resources.

Open Source in Automotive

Another reason automotive companies often overlook open source is because organizations believe that there’s no economic value to participating in its development and distribution. The hundreds of billions of dollars made each year by hundreds of companies (including Apple, Facebook, Google, Amazon, RedHat and thousands of others) prove otherwise. There are a myriad of benefits – cost reduction, speed of deployment and simplification of change management – that come with utilizing open source software, and the industry could accelerate business value by leveraging these tools.

2018 is shaping up to be an important year for open source in automotive, but there are still a few major concerns that need to be resolved. Out of all the challenges that the industry faces, the primary concern involves third-party safety certification. Attaining third-party certification for any software project (open source or not) is difficult.

However, the argument that open source software, by its nature, can’t be certified or used in life safety applications is invalid. For example, open source software has been behind image-guided surgery equipment since 2006, spurring innovation and advancement in robotic-assisted platforms and improving patient outcome. In 2018, you can expect to see the transition from “useful” to “essential” for more and more open source projects, especially as the whole industry steps up and learns how to use software as a competitive differentiator in the marketplace.

Martin Focazio is Managing Principal, Business Consulting, EPAM