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By: Arpit Joshipura, General Manager, Networking, Edge & IoT, the Linux Foundation

The first Open Networking Summit was held in October 2011 at Stanford University and described as “a premier event about OpenFlow and Software-Defined Networking (SDN)”. Here we are seven and half years later and I’m constantly amazed at both how far we’ve come since then, and at how quickly a traditionally slow-moving industry like telecommunications is embracing change and innovation powered by open source. Coming out of the ONS Summit in Amsterdam last fall, Network World described open source networking as the “new norm,” and indeed, open platforms have become de-facto standards in networking.  

Like the technology, ONS as an event is constantly evolving to meet industry needs and is designed to help you take advantage of this revolution in networking. The theme of this year’s event is “Enabling Collaborative Development & Innovation” and we’re doing this by exploring collaborative development and innovation across the ecosystem for enterprises, service providers and cloud providers onkey areas like SDN, NFV, VNF, CNF/Cloud Native Networking, Orchestration, Automation of Cloud, Core Network, Edge, Access, IoT services, and more.

A unique aspect of ONS is that it facilitates deep technical discussions in parallel with exciting keynotes, industry, and business discussions in an integrated program. The latest innovations from the networking project communities including LF Networking (ONAP, OpenDaylight, OPNFV, Tungsten Fabric) are well represented in the program, and in features and add-ons such as the LFN Unconference Track and LFN Networking Demos. A variety of event experiences ensure that attendees have ample opportunities to meet and engage with each other in sessions, the expo hall, and during social events.

New this year is a track structure built to cover the key topics in depth to meet the needs of both CIOs/CTO/architects and developers, sysadmins, NetOps and DevOps teams:

The ONS Schedule is now live — find the sessions and tutorials that will help you learn how to participate in the open source communities and ecosystems that will make a difference in your networking career. And if you need help convincing your boss, this will help you make the case.

The standard price expires March 17th so hurry up and register today! Be sure to check out the Day Passes and Hall Passes available as well.

I hope to see you there!

 

Cloud Foundry

Multi-platform means enterprises would want a variety of platforms for a variety of application workloads, says Cloud Foundry’s Abby Kearns.

2018 has been an amazing year for Cloud Foundry, with Alibaba joining as a Gold member, and Pivotal going public with its IPO, among some of the highlights. I recently talked with Abby Kearns, Executive Director of Cloud Foundry Foundation, to reflect on these milestones and more.

Kearns has been part of the Cloud Foundry ecosystem for the past five years and, under her leadership, Cloud Foundry has grown and evolved and found its way into half of the Fortune 500 companies, with those numbers increasing daily.

All of the major public cloud vendors want to be part of the ecosystem. “This year, we saw Alibaba join as a Gold member, and Cloud Foundry is now natively available on Alibaba Cloud,” said Kearns.

In 2017, Cloud Foundry embraced Kubernetes, the hottest open source project, and created CFCR (Cloud Foundry Container Runtime). “Kubernetes is a great technology that brings tons of capabilities to containers, which are the fundamental building blocks for a lot of portability for cloud native apps,” Kearns said.

“CFCR, which is Kubernetes on BOSH, allows enterprises to start running containerized workloads alongside Cloud Foundry deployments. … They now have a single plane of operations, which allows them to have a variety of applications,” she explained.

However, Kearns sees that the market is evolving beyond just multi-cloud. “We are entering into a multi-platform world where enterprises are going to be running a variety of technologies and solutions to address the variety of workload needs with their applications,” said Kearns.

When asked what she meant by multi-platform in the context of cloud, Kearns explained, “Multi-platform means that enterprises would want a variety of platforms for a variety of application workloads. There’s never going to be one technology that solves everything. It’s not going to be Cloud Foundry or Kubernetes; it’s going to be a mix. At the end of the day, enterprises are broad and complex. They have evolving needs. They want a mix of technologies that complement each other.”

However, multi-platform brings its own set of challenges. “Technology is the easy part, my big worry is people getting caught up in the hype of something new and then they want to have it. Then they want to have the next shiny thing,” she said.

When you get caught up in that hype cycle, you lose focus on what you need to do. Enterprises need to be aware of this and must ask themselves what do their business need to do? What are the outcomes they expect? How do they leverage technology to achieve that?

“I think taking a step back and asking ourselves what are we really trying to solve,” she said. “I think just for me, sometimes it is — take a breath, pause and think, okay, where, where are we going and why?”

Hear more from Abby Kearns in the video below:

The Xen Project is now one of the most popular open source hypervisors and amasses more than 10 million users, and this October marks our 15th anniversary.

In the 1990s, Xen was a part of a research project to build a public computing infrastructure on the Internet led by Ian Pratt and Keir Fraser at The University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory. The Xen Project is now one of the most popular open source hypervisors and amasses more than 10 million users, and this October marks our 15th anniversary.

From its beginnings, Xen technology focused on building a modular and flexible architecture, a high degree of customizability, and security. This security mindset from the outset led to inclusion of non-core security technologies, which eventually allowed the Xen Project to excel outside of the data center and be a trusted source for security and embedded vendors (ex. Qubes, Bromium, Bitdefender, Star Labs, Zentific, Dornerworks, Bosch, BAE systems), and also a leading hypervisor contender for the automotive space.

As the Xen Project looks to a future of virtualization everywhere, we reflect back on some of our major achievements over the last 15 years. To celebrate, we’ve created an infographic that captures some of our key milestones share it on social.

A few community members also weighed in on some of their favorite Xen Project moments and what’s to come:

“Xen offers best-in-class isolation and separation while preserving nearly bare-metal performance on x86 and ARM platforms. The growing market for a secure hypervisor ensures Xen will continue to grow in multiple markets to meet users demands.”

  • Doug Goldstein, Software Developer V, Hypervisors at Rackspace

“Xen started life at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory, as part of the XenoServers research project to build a public computing infrastructure on the Internet. It’s been fantastic to see the impact of Xen, and the role it’s played at the heart of what we now call Infrastructure as a Service Cloud Computing. It’s been an incredible journey from Xen’s early beginnings in the University, to making our first open source release in 2003, to building a strong community of contributors around the project, and then Xen’s growth beyond server virtualization into end-user systems and now embedded devices. Xen is a great example of the power of open source to enable cooperation and drive technological progress.”

  • Ian Pratt, Founder and President at Bromium, and Xen Project Founder

“From its beginnings as a research project, able to run just a handful of Linux VMs, through being the foundation of many of the world’s largest clouds, to being the open-source hypervisor of choice for many next-generation industrial, automotive and aeronautical applications, Xen Project has shown its adaptability, flexibility and pioneering spirit for 15 years. Today, at Citrix, Xen remains the core of our Citrix Hypervisor platform, powering the secure delivery of applications and data to organizations across the globe. Xen Project Hypervisor allows our customers to run thousands of virtual desktops per server, many of them using Xen’s ground-breaking GPU virtualization capabilities. Happy birthday, Xen!”

  • James Bulpin, Senior Director of Technology at Citrix

“The Xen open source community is a vibrant and diverse platform for collaboration, something which is important to Arm and vital to the ongoing success of our ecosystem. We’ve contributed to the Xen open source hypervisor across a range of markets starting with mobile, moving into the strategic enablement that allowed the deployment of Arm-based cloud servers, and more recently focusing on the embedded space, exploring computing in safety-sensitive environments such as connected vehicles.”

  • Mark Hambleton, Vice President of Open Source Software, Arm

“I – like many others – associate cloud computing with Xen. All my cloud-related projects are tied to companies running large deployments of Xen. These days even my weekend binge-watching needs are satisfied by a Xen instance somewhere. With Xen making its way into cars, rocket launch operations and satellites, it’s safe to say the industry at large recognizes it as a solid foundation for building the future, and I’m excited to be a part of it.”

  • Mihai Dontu, Chief Linux Officer at Bitdefender

“Xen was the first open source hypervisor for the data center, the very foundation of the cloud as we know it. Later, it pioneered virtualization for embedded and IoT, making its way into set-top boxes and smaller ARM devices. Now, we are discussing automotive, medical and industrial devices. It is incredibly exciting to be part of a ground-breaking project that has been at the forefront of open source innovation since its inception.”

  • Stefano Stabellini, Principal Engineer, Tech Lead at Xilinx and Xen on ARM Committer and Maintainer

“Congratulations to the Xen Project on this milestone anniversary. As the first open source data center hypervisor, Xen played a key role in defining what virtualization technology could deliver and has been the foundation for many advancements in the modern data center and cloud computing. Intel has been involved with Xen development since the early days and enjoys strong collaboration with the Xen community, which helped make Xen the first hypervisor to include Intel® Virtualization Technology (VT-x) support, providing a more secure, efficient platform for server workload consolidation and the growth of cloud computing.”

  • Susie Li, Director of Open Source Virtualization Engineering, Intel Corp.

“It is amazing how a project that started 15 years ago has not lost any of its original appeal, despite the constant evolution of hardware architectures and new applications that were unimaginable when the Xen Project started. In certain segments, e.g. power management, the pace of innovation in Xen is just accelerating and serves as the ultimate reference for all other virtualization efforts. Happy quinceañera (sweet 15) Xen!”

  • Vojin Zivojnovic, CEO and Co-Founder of Aggios

Building the Journey Towards the Next 15 Years; Sneak Peek into Xen Project 4.12

The next Xen Project release is set for March 2019. The release continues to support the Xen Project’s efforts around security with cloud environments and rich features and architectural changes for automotive and embedded use cases. Expect:

  • Deprivileged Device Model: Under tech preview in QEMU 3.0, the feature adds extra restrictions to a device model running in domain 0 in order to prevent a compromised device model to attack the rest of the system.  
  • Capability to compile a PV-only version of Xen giving cloud providers simplified management, reducing the surface of attack, and the ability to build a Xen Project hypervisor configuration with no “classic” PV support at all.
  • Xen to boot multiple domains in parallel on Arm, in addition to dom0 enabling booting of domains in less than 1 second. This is the first step towards a dom0-less Xen, which impacts statically configured embedded systems that require very fast boot times.  
  • Reduction of codesize to 46 KSLOC for safety certification and the first phase of making the codebase MISRA C compliant.
    • MISRA C is a set of software development guidelines for the C programming language developed by the Motor Industry Software Reliability Association with the aim to facilitate code safety, security, portability, and reliability in the context of embedded systems.

Thank you for the last 15 years and for the next 15+ to come!

Lars Kurth, Chairperson of the Xen Project

The Linux Foundation’s Jim Zemlin welcomes attendees to Open Source Summit in Vancouver.

The Linux Foundation’s job is to create engines of innovation and enable the gears of those engines to spin faster, said Executive Director Jim Zemlin, in opening remarks at Open Source Summit in Vancouver.

Examples of how the organization is driving innovation across industries can be seen in projects such as Let’s Encrypt, a free, automated certificate authority working to encrypt the entire web, Automotive Grade Linux, Hyperledger, and the new Academy Software Foundation, which is focused on open collaboration within the motion picture industry.

This is open source beyond Linux and, according to Zemlin, is indicative of one of the best years and most robust periods at The Linux Foundation itself. So far in 2018, the organization has added a new member every single day, with Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), one of The Linux Foundation’s fastest growing projects, announcing 38 new members this week.

Successful projects depend on members, developers, standards, and infrastructure to develop products that the market will adopt, said Zemlin, and The Linux Foundation facilitates this success in many ways. It works downstream helping industry, government, and academia understand how to consume and contribute to open source. At the same time, it works upstream to foster development and adoption of open source solutions, showing industries how to create value and generate reinvestment.

During his keynote, Zemlin spoke with Sarah Novotny, Open Source Strategy Lead at Google Cloud, about Google’s support of open source development. In the talk, Novotny announced that Google Cloud is transferring ownership and management of the Kubernetes project’s cloud resources to CNCF community contributors and is additionally granting $9 million over three years to CNCF to cover infrastructure costs associated with Kubernetes development and distribution. Novotny, who noted that the project is actively seeking new contributors, said this commitment will provide the opportunity for more people to get involved.

In the words of Zemlin, let’s go solve big problems, one person, one project, one industry at a time.

The power of cloud lies in the ability to create ideas and get them into production as quickly as possible, said Cloud Foundry’s Abby Kearns at LC3.

Cloud and open source are changing the world and can play an integral role in how companies transform themselves. That was the message from Abby Kearns, executive director of open source platform as a service provider Cloud Foundry Foundation, who delivered a keynote address earlier this summer at LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen China, known as LC3.

“Cloud native technologies and cloud native applications are growing,’’ Kearns said. Over the next 18 months, there will be a 100 percent increase in the number of cloud native applications organizations are writing and using, she added. “This means you can no longer just invest in IT,” but need to in cloud and cloud technologies as well.

The power of the cloud

CIOs are thinking about how to do more with what they have, how to be innovative and keep an eye toward the future while saving money, Kearns said. Architects have to think about how to build an infrastructure that supports future needs and developers need to think about developing the new apps to allow their organizations to be competitive. So everyone’s jobs have gotten harder as a result, Kearns noted. It can be made easier, she maintained, with collaboration and open source.

“Collectively, the capabilities we can bring to bear around cloud are way more powerful through open source,” she said.

Kearns also discussed the digital transformation movement, and said organizations are looking to become software companies and write and develop code and get it into production as quickly as possible on any cloud. At the same time, they are also trying to figure out how to be more responsive to customers as their needs change and ultimately, get new ideas out to market quicker and iterate on those ideas over and over.

Real world use cases

To give the audience an idea of what the future will look like and where investments are being made in cloud and open source, Kearns cited a few examples. The automotive industry is changing rapidly, she said, and a Volkswagen automobile, for example, is no longer just a car; it has become a connected mobile device filled with sensors and data.

“Volkswagen realized they need to build out developer teams and applications that could take advantage of many clouds across 12 different brands,” she said. The car company has invested in Cloud Foundry and cloud native technologies to help them do that, she added.

“At the end of the day it’s about the applications that extend that car through mobile apps, supply chain management — all of that pulled together to bring a single concise experience for the automotive industry.”

One of her “favorite” examples is the U.S. Air Force, which Kearns said isn’t often thought of as being agile and using bleeding-edge technology. Although the Air Force has a “massive technology budget,” 70 percent of it was going toward just maintaining existing infrastructure. Only 30 percent was going toward research and development and new software.

But the Air Force has implemented agile practices and is now taking advantage of cloud and developing apps to run on multiple clouds, she said. These changes allowed them to rethink how they allocate time and money, and they have been able to get apps out the door — in weeks and months — instead of years, she said.

Today, 70 percent of its budget is going toward R&D and 30 percent toward maintaining existing infrastructure. “And in the process, they also saved $600 million in one year,’’ Kearns added.

In another example, she said Home Depot found itself being disrupted by big e-commerce leaders like Amazon, which sold more hammers in a year than it did. “They needed to figure out how to compete … on cloud with cloud native apps and iterate and develop those applications quickly,’’ Kearns said.

Home Depot invested in a platform and made the shift to continuous delivery and moved thousands of apps to public and private clouds. They went from spending six weeks to develop one app and get it in production to deploying a new app to production every 15 minutes, she said.

That’s the power of cloud, cloud platforms and cloud native architectures; the ability to create ideas and get them into production as quickly as possible, she stressed.

The examples Kearns gave were all done using open source, which “provides an opportunity for all of us to collectively work together, and brings together diverse minds, diverse organizations and diverse people to drive real innovation. That’s what makes open source so powerful.”

Watch the entire presentation below:

Check out the co-located events at Open Source Summit, including Kubernetes training & more!

What makes attending Open Source Summit so valuable?

The people who attend, and the sharing of information that transpires when 2,000 open source leaders from around the globe gather to work together to transform technology.

In addition to education opportunities stemming from 250+ conference sessions and a plethora of collaboration opportunities in the hallway track and at networking events, Open Source Summit (previously LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen) offers added learning opportunities with a variety of co-located events: 11 this year to be exact.

The cost of travel can be the biggest hardship of attending an event, so you should make the most of it. Open Source Summit offers a number of ways to gain additional value from your trip.

This year’s co-located events and special events offerings include:

Co-Located Events

Linux Security Summit North America

Monday, August 27- Tuesday, August 28*

The Linux Security Summit is a technical forum for collaboration between Linux developers, researchers, and end users. Its primary aim is to foster community efforts in analyzing and solving Linux security challenges.

mountpoint 2018

Monday, August 27- Tuesday, August 28*

mountpoint 2018 unites the Ceph and Gluster communities, SDS experts, and partners to bring you an exciting two-day event.

LF Deep Learning Workshop

Tuesday, August 28*

Learn more about how the Linux Foundation’s Deep Learning Foundation is supporting open source innovation in Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and Deep Learning.

CHAOSScon North America

Tuesday, August 28*

This conference will show CHAOSS updates, use cases, and hands-on workshops for developers, community managers, project managers, and anyone interested in measuring open source project health.

Cloud-Native Network Functions (CNF) Seminar

Tuesday, August 28*

Two of the fastest-growing Linux Foundation projects – ONAP (part of LF Networking) and Kubernetes (part of CNCF) – are coming together in the next generation telecom architecture. This interactive seminar will be co-moderated by LF Networking GM Arpit Joshipura and Cloud Native Computing Foundation Executive Director Dan Kohn.

Egeria Open Metadata & Governance Workshop

Tuesday, August 28*

Learn more about Egeria, a new project from the ODPi that supports the free flow of metadata between different technologies.

OpenAPI Workshop

Tuesday, August 28*

Participate in this hands-on workshop to learn what OpenAPI is, who is using it, what you can do with it, as well as hands-on training on its advanced features, and a preview of the anticipated September 2018 release.

OpenChain Mini Summit

Tuesday, August 28*

The workshop will feature new compliance reference material, new training material, new case studies, interactive panels, and plenty of networking.

OpenHPC Workshop

Tuesday, August 28*

Participants will get a hands-on experience installing a bare metal instance of OpenHPC on clustered Intel NUCs to see how easy it is to get started.

LFCS & Linux on Azure Training Courses

Wednesday, August 29 – Thursday, August 30*

Presented by ITGilde and The Linux Foundation.

Cloud & Container Apprentice Linux Engineer Tutorials

Wednesday, August 29 – Friday, August 31

Event Experiences:

Lightning Talks

Tuesday, August 28

Better Together Diversity Social

Tuesday, August 28*

Vancouver Sightseeing Bus Tour

Wednesday, August 29*

First-time Attendee Breakfast

Wednesday, August 29

Open Source Career Mixer

Wednesday, August 29*

Women in Open Source Lunch

Wednesday, August 29*

All-Attendee Opening Reception at Vancouver Aquarium

Wednesday, August 29

Meet & Eat

Wednesday, August 29 – Friday, August 31*

Diversity Empowerment Summit

Wednesday, August 29 – Friday, August 31

Open Collaboration Conference

Wednesday, August 29 – Friday, August 31

5K Fun Run

Thursday, August 30*

Speed Mentoring & Networking

Thursday, August 30*

Onsite Attendee Reception & Sponsor Showcase

Thursday, August 30

Invitation Only Partner Reception

Thursday, August 30

Morning Meditation

Friday, August 31*

Kids Day

Friday, August 31*

Puppy Pawlooza

Friday, August 31

*Limited availability and/or requires pre-registration

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Join the LF Events Slack.

Cloud-native

Sign up for this interactive workshop that examines networking and cloud-native technologies side by side.

ONAP and Kubernetes – two of the fastest-growing Linux Foundation projects – are coming together in the next generation of telecom architecture.  

ONAP provides a comprehensive platform for real-time, policy-driven orchestration and automation of physical and virtual network functions, and Kubernetes is an open source system for automating deployment, scaling, and management of containerized applications. Telcos are now examining how these virtual network functions (VNFs) could evolve into cloud-native network functions (CNFs) running on Kubernetes.

In a three-hour interactive workshop on cloud-native network functions at Open Source Summit, Dan Kohn, Executive Director, Cloud Native Computing Foundation, and Arpit Joshipura, GM Networking & Orchestration, The Linux Foundation, will explain networking and cloud-native terms and concepts side by side.

“As the next-generation of telco architecture evolves, CSPs are exploring how their Virtual Network Functions (VNFs) can evolve into Cloud-native Network Functions (CNFs), ” said Joshipura. “This seminar will explore  what’s involved in migrating from VNFs to CNFs, with a specific focus on the roles played by ONAP and Kubernetes. We hope to see a broad swatch of community members from both the container and networking spaces join us for an engaging and informative discussion in Vancouver.”

Session highlights will include:

  • Migrating and automating network functions to virtual networking functions to CNFs
  • Overview of sub-projects focusing on this migration, including cross-cloud CI, ONAP/OVP, FD.io/VPP, etc.
  • The role for a service mesh, such as like Envoy, Istio, or Linkerd, in connecting CNFs with load balancing, canary deployments, policy enforcement, and more.
  • What is involved in telcos adopting modern continuous integration / continuous deployment (CI/CD) tools to be able to rapidly innovate and improve their CNFs while retaining confidence in the reliability.
  • Differing security needs of trusted (open source and vendor-provided) code vs. running untrusted code
  • The role for security isolation technologies like gVisor or Kata
  • Requirements of the underlying operating system
  • Strengths and weaknesses of different network architectures such as multi-interface pods and Network Service Mesh
  • Status of IPv6 and dual-stack support in Kubernetes

Additional registration is required for this session, but there is no extra fee. Space is limited in the workshop, so reserve your spot soon. And, if you plan to attend, please be willing to participate. Learn more and sign up now!

Open Source Summit

Open Source Summit is THE place to learn about latest open source trends and technologies. Register now!

Open Source Summit North America is right around the corner. There will be hundreds of sessions, workshops, and talks, all curated by experts in the Linux and open source communities. It’s not an easy feat to choose the topics and sessions you want to attend at the event  because there are so many topics and only so much time.

In this article, we talk with Laura Abbott, a developer employed by Red Hat, and Bryan Liles, a developer at Heptio, a Kubernetes company, based in Seattle, Washington, about the upcoming event. Abbott is on the program committee for Open Source Summit, and Liles is one of the program chairs, working hard “to build out a schedule that touches on many aspects of Open Source.”

Hot topics

“I’ve been interested in cloud-native applications for a few years now, and I spend most of my time thinking about the problems and developing software in this space,” said Liles. “I’m also interested in computer vision, augmented reality, and virtual reality. One of the most important topics in this space right now is Machine Learning. It’s amazing to see all the open source solutions being created. I feel that even as a hobbyist, I can find tools to help me build and run models without causing me to go into debt. Personally, I’m looking forward to the talks in the Infrastructure & Automation and the Kubernetes/Containers/Cloud Native Apps tracks.”

Here are just a few of the must-see cloud computing sessions:

As a kernel developer, Abbott gets excited when people talk about their future kernel work, especially when it involves the internals like the page cache or memory management. “I also love to see topics that talk about getting people involved in projects for the first time,” she said. “I’m also excited to see the Diversity Empowerment Summit and learning from the speakers there.”

You may wonder as we are moving toward the cloud native world, where everything is running in a cloud, does Linux even matter anymore? But, the fact is Linux is powering the cloud.

“Linux is what’s powering all those topics. When people say Linux. they’re usually referring to the complete platform from kernel to userspace libraries. You need a solid base to be able to run your application in the cloud. The entire community of Linux contributors enables today’s developers to work with the latest technologies,” said Abbott.

A few of the featured talks in the Linux Systems and Development track include:

Latest Trends

“DevOps is unsurprisingly a hot topic,” said Abbott. “There is a lot of focus on how to move towards newer best practices with projects like Kubernetes and how to best monitor your infrastructure. Blockchain technologies are a very hot topic. Some of this work is very forward looking but there’s a lot of interest in figuring out if blockchain can solve existing problems,” said Abbott.

That means OSSNA is the place to be if you are interested in emerging trends and technologies. “If you are looking to see what is coming next, or currently involved in Open Source, you should attend,” says Liles. “The venue is in a great location in Vancouver, so you can also take in the city between listening to your peers during talks or debating current trends during the hallway track,” said Liles.

Abbott concluded, “Anyone who is excited about Linux should attend. There’s people talking about such a wide variety of topics from kernel development to people management. There’s something for everyone.”

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Register for Open Source Summit by August 4 to save $150.

Here’s a sneak peek at why you need to be at Open Source Summit in Vancouver next month! But hurry – spots are going quickly. Secure your space and register by August 4 to save $150.

  1. Awesome content: 250+ sessions on Linux systems, cloud native development, cloud infrastructure, AI, blockchain and open source program management & community leadership.
  2. Deep Dive Labs & Tutorials: Including Hands-On with Cilium Network Security, Cloud-native Network Functions (CNF) Seminar, Istio Playground Lab, Practical Machine Learning Lab, First Tutorial on Container Orchestration plus many more – all included in one low registration price.
  3. 3. 9 Co-located Events: Linux Security Summit, OpenChain Summit, Acumos AI Developer Mini-Summit, Cloud & Container Apprentice Linux Engineer tutorials, CHAOSSCon and much more!
  4. Evening Events: Collaborate with fellow attendees at the Vancouver Aquarium and the onsite attendee reception.
  5. Activities: Take a break and go on a sightseeing bus tour, join the 5K fun run or morning meditation, meet with fellow attendees through the meet & eat experience or networking app, or play with puppies at the Puppy Pawlooza.
  6. Diversity Empowerment: Explore ways to advance diversity and inclusion in the community and across the technology industry by attending the Diversity Empowerment Summit & Better Together Diversity Social.
  7. Kids Day: Bring your kids and introduce them to the fun and magic of web design.
  8. Women in Open Source Lunch: Join women and non-binary members of the open source community for an engaging, uplifting lunch!
  9. Developer & Hallway Track Lounges: Lounges and reserved spaces for developers to hack and collaborate throughout the event.
  10. Networking Opportunities: Attend the Speed Networking & Mentoring event or use the networking app to expand your open source community connections by finding and meeting with attendees with similar interests.

VIEW THE FULL SCHEDULE »

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Applications for diversity and needs-based scholarships are also being accepted. Get information on eligibility and how to apply. Free childcare is also available for attendees.

LF networking

A lot of the interactions between the LF Networking and cloud native communities focus on how these technologies work together and on connecting people from different projects.

As highlighted in the recent Open Source Jobs Report, cloud and networking skills are in high demand. And, if you want to hear about the latest networking developments, there is no one better to talk with than Heather Kirksey, VP, Community and Ecosystem Development, Networking at The Linux Foundation. Kirksey was the Director of OPNFV before the recent consolidation of several networking-related projects under the new LF Networking umbrella, and I spoke with her to learn more about LF Networking (LFN) and how the initiative is working closely with cloud native technologies.

Kirksey explained the reasoning behind the move and expansion of her role. “At OPNFV, we were focused on integration and end-to-end testing across the LFN projects. We had interaction with all of those communities. At the same time, we were separate legal entities, and things like that created more barriers to collaboration. Now, it’s easy to look at them more strategically as a portfolio to facilitate member engagement and deliver solutions to service providers.”

Bringing these six networking projects together lowers barriers, reduces friction, and enables the communities to interact with each other.

LF networkingNetworking Meets Cloud Native

Kirksey said that at the recent KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe 2018, there was a lot of discussion around what cloud native network function virtualization (NFV) looks like with Kubernetes and other technologies. She said that the NFV community has already begun integration around cloud native technologies including Kubernetes, Prometheus, Fluentd, and FD.io. And, LF Networking has been working on Container Network Interface (CNI) plugins.

A lot of these interactions between the LF Networking and Kubernetes communities focus on education how these technologies work together and connecting with people from different projects including Istio, CNI networking SIG, and others.

“We are just trying to figure out the answers that arise as these projects work together,” she said. In her new role, Kirksey looks at things from an outwardly facing perspective. “We are looking at communities that are outside LF Networking communities like CNCF and figuring out what our engagement model should be. We are trying to identify projects that are of interest to us. We are trying to set up some programs that bring value to the ecosystem; a good example would be a compliance program.”

Community is also part of Kirksey’s new role, and she is working to find out what’s needed to help the community create opportunities for interaction and involvement.  “We have set up end-user advisory groups, member engagement programs, compliance and certification programs,” she said. The goal is to serve the entire ecosystem around these projects.

Challenges

Looking at some of the cloud native paradigms of how networking works, it’s simpler for an application developer than it used it be. Initially, these developers took things like interfaces, ports, and subnets and put ‘v’ in front of them and created virtual interfaces, virtual ports, and virtual subnets. But these constructs are not tied to physical ideas anymore, so the approach is different.

“There is a lot of stuff at layer two and layer three that is still complicated, but you don’t want Kubernetes to have to worry about that; you certainly don’t want a Kubernetes-based application to have to worry about that,” Kirksey said, “ We are trying to figure out how we deal with some of the complexities of networking, without bringing the physical baggage with it.”

It’s not just technical challenges that these communities need to solve, there are also people challenges. So many new technologies are emerging that it’s becoming increasingly difficult to find experienced developers, and networking is no exception.  According to Kirksey, “People who understand and can do deep network level programming are fairly rare.” And, she said, “The number of people who can program for or contribute to VPP or DPDK is relatively small. They now need to also extend their knowledge to these new technologies.”

New Ideas

Additionally, you can’t just create training programs and train people. “The number of people contributing to these projects is relatively small as it’s new and is still being defined,” she said, “That’s one reality of living at the bleeding edge.”

Nonetheless, LF Networking did start some programs to start building the foundation for training as these technologies stabilize and mature. “We recently launched ONAP and OPNFV training. But other technologies need to reach a certain level of maturity befores we can create courses for them,” she said. A new “Introduction to Open Source Networking Technologies” training course that covers multiple projects is also now available.

Understanding what’s going on is the first step in solving a problem. That’s where events like KubeCon + CloudNativeCon become critical as they bring together people from different communities to learn and solve problems. “I learned a lot and started to wrap my head around some of these concepts a little bit more,” Kirksey said.

A lot of cross-pollination happens at events, too. When you meet people with bright ideas, you can adopt those good ideas and good marketing practices and apply them to your own work.

“To be quite blunt, when you see good ideas, you try to harvest them for yourself because, you know, that’s the point of open source,” Kirksey said.