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Open Networking Summit NA

Speak at the Largest Open Networking & Orchestration Event of 2018.

Share your expertise and help shape the future of SDN, NFV, orchestration and the automation of cloud, network, & IoT services at Open Networking Summit North America, March 26 -29, 2018 in Los Angeles.

Sign up to get the latest updates on ONS NA 2018!

The call for proposals deadline is quickly approaching! With more than 2000 attendees expected at this year’s event, submit before Sunday, January 14, 2018 at 11:59pm PST to share your ideas and expertise with the open networking community.

View the full list of suggested topics and submit your proposal today.

Get inspired! Watch presentations from ONS 2017:

See all keynotes from ONS 2017

Not submitting, but planning to attend? Register by February 11 and save $800!

Open Networking Summit NA

Speak at the Largest Open Networking & Orchestration Event of 2018.

Share your expertise and help shape the future of SDN, NFV, orchestration and the automation of cloud, network, & IoT services at Open Networking Summit North America, March 26 -29, 2018 in Los Angeles.

Sign up to get the latest updates on ONS NA 2018!

The call for proposals deadline is quickly approaching! With more than 2000 attendees expected at this year’s event, submit before Sunday, January 14, 2018 at 11:59pm PST to share your ideas and expertise with the open networking community.

View the full list of suggested topics and submit your proposal today.

Get inspired! Watch presentations from ONS 2017:

See all keynotes from ONS 2017

Not submitting, but planning to attend? Register by February 11 and save $800!

Open Source Leadership Summit

Share your knowledge, best practices, and strategies at Open Source Leadership Summit.

Open Source Leadership Summit (OSLS) is an invitation-only think tank where open source software and collaborative development thought leaders convene, discuss best practices, and learn how to manage today’s largest shared technology investments.

The Linux Foundation invites you to share your knowledge, best practices, and strategies with fellow open source leaders at OSLS.  

Tracks & Suggested Topics for Open Source Leadership Summit:

OS Program Office

  • Consuming and Contributing to Open Source
  • Driving Participation and Inclusiveness in Open Source Projects
  • Standards and Open Source
  • Managing Competing Corporate Interests while Driving Coherent Communities
  • How to Vet the Viability of OS Projects
  • Open Source + Startup Business Models
  • Project Planning and Strategy
  • Internal vs. External Developer Adoption

Best Practices in Open Source Development / Lessons Learned

  • Contribution Policies
  • Promoting Your Open Source Project
  • Open Source Best Practices
  • Open Source Program Office Case Studies and Success Stories
  • Standards and Open Source

Growing & Sustaining Project Communities / Metrics and Actions Taken

  • Collaboration Models to Address Security Issues
  • Metrics for Understanding Project Health

Automating Compliance / Gaps & Successes

  • Using Trademarks in Open Communities
  • Working with Regulators / Regulated Industries
  • Working with the Government on OS
  • How to Incorporate SPDX Identifiers in Your Project
  • Legal + Compliance
  • Licensing + Patents
  • Successfully Working Upstream & Downstream

Certifying Open Source Projects

  • Security
  • Safety
  • Export
  • Government Restrictions
  • Open Source vs. Open Governance
  • New Frontiers for Open Source in FinTech and Healthcare

Futures

  • Upcoming Trends
  • R&D via Open Source
  • Sustainability

Business Leadership

  • Cultivating Open Source Leadership
  • How to Run a Business that Relies on Open Source
  • How to be an Effective Board Member
  • How to Invest in Your Project’s Success
  • Managing Competing Corporate Interests while Driving Coherent Communities
  • Monetizing Open Source & Innovators Dilemma

View here for more details on suggested topics, and submit your proposal before the Jan. 21 deadline.

Get inspired! Watch keynotes from Open Source Leadership Summit 2017.

See all keynotes from OSLS 2017 »

open source community

Zachary Dupont wrote a letter to his hero Linus Torvalds back in 2014. Here, they catch up on stage at Open Source Summit NA 2017.

The Linux Foundation works through our projects, training and certification programs, events and more to bring people of all backgrounds into open source. We meet a lot of people, but find the drive and enthusiasm of some of our youngest community members to be especially infectious. In the past couple of months, we’ve invited 13-year-old algorithmist and cognitive developer Tanmay Bakshi, 11-year-old hacker and cybersecurity ambassador Reuben Paul, and 15-year-old programmer Keila Banks to speak at Linux Foundation conferences.

In 2014 when he was 12, Zachary Dupont wrote a letter to his hero Linus Torvalds. We arranged for Zach to meet Linus–a visit that helped clinch his love for Linux. This year, Zach came to Open Source Summit in Los Angeles to catch up with Linus and let us know what he’s been up to. He’s kept busy with an internship at SAP and early acceptance to the Computer Networking and Digital Forensics program at the Delaware County Technical School.

The open source community encouraged Zach to pursue his passions. They’ve inspired him, and he plans to give back in the future.

We encourage everyone to find ways to bring more people of all ages into open source. Volunteer your time to teach students or people making mid-career changes how to code, spend time on writing documentation for your open source project so others can get to know it better, or simply take the time to answer beginner questions on message boards. The more people we bring into the community, the stronger we will be in the years ahead.

Calendar of open source events, including new Open Networking Summit Europe, enable leading technologists to meet, collaborate and innovate in neutral forums

SAN FRANCISCO, November 21, 2017The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced its 2018 events schedule. Linux Foundation events are where the creators, maintainers and practitioners of the world’s most important open source projects meet. Linux Foundation events in 2017 attracted over 25,000 developers, sysadmins, architects, community thought leaders, business executives and other industry professionals from more than 5,000 organizations across 85 countries.

The Linux Foundation’s 2018 events will gather 30,000 open source influencers to learn about new trends in open source and share knowledge of best practices across projects dealing with operating systems, cloud applications, containers, IoT, networking, data processing, security, storage, AI, software architecture, edge computing and more. There are also events looking at the business side of open source, gathering business and technical leaders to learn about compliance, governance, building an open source office and other areas.

“It is essential in open source that individuals working on a project have the opportunity to meet and collaborate in person, and Linux Foundation events provide a neutral place for them to do that,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director at The Linux Foundation. “In addition, these events gather leading experts on a wide variety of open source technologies in the same place, enabling them to share ideas and best practices not only within, but across projects. These events truly drive innovation and creativity throughout the community.”

New to Linux Foundation events in 2018 is the expansion of Open Networking Summit (ONS) to Europe. ONS brings together business and technical leaders across enterprise, cloud and service providers to share learnings, highlight innovation and discuss the future of open networking and orchestration. For the first time since its founding seven years ago, ONS will offer two conferences in a single year, with the second taking place in Europe.

The complete schedule and descriptions of all 2018 events follows.

The Linux Foundation’s 2018 Schedule of Events

AGL All Member Meeting Japan   

February 20-21, 2018

The AGL AMM takes place bi-annually and brings the Automotive Grade Linux community together to learn about the latest developments, share best practices and collaborate to drive rapid innovation across the industry.

Open Source Leadership Summit  

March 6-8 2018

Sonoma Valley, California, US

Open Source Leadership Summit is an invitation-only think tank for open source software and collaborative development thought leaders to convene, share best practices and learn how to manage the largest shared technology investments of our time.

Embedded Linux Conference North America + OpenIoT Summit

March 12-14, 2018

Portland, Oregon, US

ELC is the premier vendor-neutral technical conference for companies and developers using Linux in embedded products. OpenIoT Summit delivers the technical knowledge you need to deliver smart connected products and solutions that take advantage of the rapid evolution of IoT technologies. It is the only IoT event focused on the development of open IoT solutions.

Open Networking Summit

March 26 – 29, 2018

Los Angeles, California, US

ONS brings together business and technical leaders across enterprise, cloud and service providers to share learnings, highlight innovation and discuss the future of open networking and orchestration.

Cloud Foundry Summit North America

April 18-20, 2018

Boston, Massachusetts, US

Cloud Foundry Summit is the premier event for end users to learn the platform from those who build and use it every day. Join thousands of developers in Boston to learn how to run apps at scale – using a platform or containers on multiple clouds.

Linux Storage, Filesystems and Memory Management Summit

April 23 – 25, 2018

Deer Valley, UT

The Linux Storage, Filesystem & Memory Management Summit gathers the foremost development and research experts and kernel subsystem maintainers to map out and implement improvements to the Linux filesystem, storage and memory management subsystems.

KubeCon + CloudNativeCon Europe

May 1-3, 2018

Copenhagen, Denmark

KubeCon + CloudNativeCon gathers all CNCF projects under one roof. Join leading technologists from open source cloud native communities to further the advancement of cloud native computing.

Open Source Summit Japan + Automotive Linux Summit

June 20-22, 2018

Tokyo, Japan

Open Source Summit is the leading conference for technologists and open source industry leaders to collaborate and share information, learn about the latest in open source technologies and find out how to gain a competitive advantage by using innovation open solutions.

The co-located Automotive Linux Summit connects the developer community driving the innovation in automotive Linux together with the vendors and users providing and using the code in order to drive the future of embedded devices in the automotive arena.

LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen China

June 25-27, 2018

Beijing, China

At LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen, attendees will collaborate, share information and learn about the newest and most interesting open source technologies, including Linux, containers, cloud technologies, networking, microservices and more; in addition to gaining insight into how to navigate and lead in the open source community.

Linux Security Summit North America

August 27-28, 2018

Vancouver BC, Canada

A technical forum for collaboration between Linux developers, researchers, and end users with the primary aim of fostering community efforts in analyzing and solving Linux security challenges.

Open Source Summit North America

August 29-31, 2018

Vancouver BC, Canada

Open Source Summit is the premier open source technical conference in North America, gathering 2,000+ developers, operators and community leadership professionals to collaborate, share information and learn about the latest in open technologies, including Linux, containers, cloud computing and more.

Open Networking Summit Europe – NEW

September 25-27, 2018

Amsterdam, Netherlands

ONS Europe brings together business and technical leaders across enterprise, cloud and service providers to share learnings, highlight innovation and discuss the future of open networking and orchestration.

Cloud Foundry Summit Europe

October 10-11, 2018

Basel, Switzerland

Cloud Foundry Summit is the premier event for end users to learn the platform from those who build and use it every day. Join thousands of developers to learn how to run apps at scale – using a platform or containers on multiple clouds.

JS Interactive (formerly Node.js Interactive)

October 10-12, 2018

Vancouver, Canada

At JS Interactive, attendees collaborate face-to-face, network, and learn how to better their skills with JS in IoT, server side, client side, serverless, and more. The program will cover a broad spectrum of the JavaScript ecosystem including Node.js, frameworks, best practices and stories from successful end-users. This is the one JavaScript conference you can’t afford to miss.

Embedded Linux Conference Europe + OpenIoT Summit Europe

October 22-24, 2018

Edinburgh, UK

ELC is the premier vendor-neutral technical conference for companies and developers using Linux in embedded products. OpenIoT Summit delivers the technical knowledge you need to deliver smart connected products and solutions that take advantage of the rapid evolution of IoT technologies. It is the only IoT event focused on the development of open IoT solution.

Open Source Summit Europe

October 22-24, 2018

Edinburgh, UK

Open Source Summit is the premier open source technical conference in Europe, gathering 2,000+ developers, operators and community leadership professionals to collaborate, share information and learn about the latest in open technologies, including Linux, containers, cloud computing and more.

Linux Security Summit Europe

October 25-26, 2018

Edinburgh, UK

A technical forum for collaboration between Linux developers, researchers, and end users with the primary aim of fostering community efforts in analyzing and solving Linux security challenges.

Kernel Summit + Linux Plumbers Conference

November 12-15, 2018

Vancouver BC, Canada

The Linux Kernel Summit brings together the world’s leading core kernel developers to discuss the state of the existing kernel and plan the next development cycle.

The co-located Linux Plumbers Conference brings together the top developers working on the “plumbing” of Linux — kernel subsystems, core libraries, windowing systems, etc. — and gives them three days to work together on core design problems.

KubeCon + CloudNativeCon North America

December 11-13, 2018

Seattle, WA

KubeCon + CloudNativeCon gathers all CNCF projects under one roof. Join leading technologists from open source cloud native communities to further the advancement of cloud native computing.

Event dates and locations will be announced shortly for additional 2018 events including:

  • The API Strategy & Practice Conference (APIStrat)
  • KubeCon + CloudNativeCon China – NEW
  • KVM Forum
  • MesosCon events
  • Open Compliance Forum
  • A new blockchain conference from the Hyperledger Project, and more.

Speaking proposals are now being accepted for the following 2018 events:

  • Cloud Foundry Summit North America (Submission Deadline: Dec 8)
  • Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit North America (Submission Deadline: Jan 7)
  • CloudNativeCon+KubeCon Europe (Submission Deadline: Jan 12)
  • Open Networking Summit North America (Submission Deadline: Jan 14)
  • Open Source Leadership Summit (Submission Deadline: Jan 21)
  • LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen China (Submission Deadline: Mar 4)
  • Open Source Summit Japan (Submission Deadline: Mar 18)
  • Automotive Linux Summit (Submission Deadline: Mar 18)
  • Open Source Summit North America (Submission Deadline: Apr 29)
  • Open Networking Summit Europe (Submission Deadline: June 24)
  • Open Source Summit Europe (Submission Deadline: Jul 1)
  • Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit Europe (Submission Deadline: Jul 1)

To submit a proposal to any of these events, visit http://events.linuxfoundation.org/cfp.

For more information about all Linux Foundation events, please visit: http://events.linuxfoundation.org.

Additional Resources

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and commercial adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage.

Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

documentation

At the upcoming APIStrat conference in Portland, Taylor Barnett will explore various documentation design principles and discuss best practices.

Taylor Barnett, a Community Engineer at Keen IO, says practice and constant iteration are key to writing good documentation.  At the upcoming API Strategy & Practice Conference 2017, Oct. 31 -Nov. 2 in Portland, OR, Barnett will explain the different types of docs and describe some best practices.

In her talk — Things I Wish People Told Me About Writing Docs — Barnett will look at how people consume documentation and discuss tools and tactics to enable other team members to write documentation.  Barnett explains more in this edited interview.

The Linux Foundation: What led you to this talk? Have you encountered projects with bad documentation?

Taylor Barnett: For the last year, my teammate, Maggie Jan, and I have been leading work to improve the developer content and documentation experience at Keen IO. It’s no secret that developers love excellent documentation, but many API companies aren’t always equipped with the resources to make that happen. As a result of this, we all come across a lot of bad documentation when you are trying to use developer tools and APIs.

The Linux Foundation: Often, there is a team of documentation writers and there are developers who wrote that piece of software; both are experts in their own fields, but they need a lot of collaboration to create usable docs. How can that collaboration be improved?

Barnett: In large companies, this can definitely be true, although in many companies documentation is still owned by various teams. The need for more collaboration still applies, though. One way to improve collaboration is bringing docs into the product development process early on. If you wait until everything is done and going to be released soon, people writing documentation are going to feel left out of the process and like an afterthought. If people working on the product development collaborate early on, not only does the product become better, but so does the documentation. People who are writing documentation usually spend some time figuring out the API or tool they are writing about, so they only get better when they can work with the people doing product development early on. Also, they can give great feedback from a user’s perspective much earlier in the process.

Another way to improve collaboration is to bring more people into the documentation review process. We do most of our documentation reviews in GitHub. It’s great to not only have someone in the role of an editor review it but also people from the Engineering or Product teams. It increases the number of eyes on the docs and helps make them better.

The Linux Foundation: How should developers approach documentation?

Barnett: Most developers are pretty familiar with the idea of Test Driven Development (TDD), but how familiar are they with Documentation Driven Development (DDD)? The flow for DDD is:

  1. Write or update documentation,
  2. Get feedback on that documentation,
  3. Write a failing test according to that documentation (TDD),
  4. Write code to pass the failing test,
  5. Repeat.

It can be an excellent way for developers to save a lot of time and prevent spending too much time on poorly designed features. As Isaac Schlueter, co-founder of npm, says about Documentation Driven Development, writing clear prose is an “effective way to increase productivity by reducing both the frequency and cost of mistakes.” Our brains can only hold so much information at once. In computer terms, our working memory size is pretty small. Writing down some of the information we are thinking about is a way to “off-load significant chunks of thought with hardly any data-loss,” while allowing us to think slower and more carefully.

For example: At Keen IO, we recently split our JavaScript library into three different modules. This decision was inspired by the documentation we were maintaining. We had tried to streamline the docs, but there was just too much to cover in an attention-constrained world. Many important details and features were hidden in the noise. For example, if all of the documentation was written sooner, we may have made this decision sooner.

Also, as a developer who is writing docs myself, constant iteration and practice are important. Your first version of the docs aren’t going to be great, but with focusing on trying to write clear prose, they will get better with time. Also, having another person who is not familiar with the product and can step through the documentation to review it is essential.

The Linux Foundation: If developers are writing documentation for other developers, how can they really think as the users?

Barnett: I used to think that developers are the best people to write docs for other developers because they are one of them. While I still believe this is partially true, some developers also assume a lot of knowledge. If it has been a while since a developer has done something, the “curse of knowledge” can exist. The more you know, the more you forget what it was like before. That’s why I like to talk about empathic documentation.

You need to empathize with the user on the other end. Don’t assume they know how to do something and give resources to fill in the steps that might seem “easy” to you. Also, hearing that something is “easy” or “simple” when something is not working on the user’s’ end is the worst feeling. It makes your users doubt themselves, feel frustrated, and a bunch of other negative emotions. Always try to remember you need to be empathetic!

The Linux Foundation: What’s the importance of tools in creating documentation?

Barnett: Very important! Earlier I mentioned using GitHub for reviews. I also would recommend having some continuous integration testing in place for your documentation site if you aren’t using a service like ReadMe or Apiary to make sure you don’t break it. A related topic is, do you build your own thing or use a service? Tools can be helpful, but they might not always be the best fit. You have to find a balance based on your current resources. Lastly, I would recommend checking out Anne Gentle’s book, Docs Like Code. She brings up tools a lot in the book.

The Linux Foundation: Who should attend your session?

Barnett: Everyone! Just kidding (kind of). If you are in any role that is developer facing like developer relations, evangelists, advocates, marketers, etc., if you are on a Product team for a developer focused product or platform, or if you are a developer or engineer who wants to write better docs.

The Linux Foundation: What is the main takeaway from your talk?

Barnett: Anyone can write docs, but with some practice, iteration, and working on different documentation writing skills anyone can write better docs.

Learn more in Taylor Barnett’s talk at the APIStrat conference coming up Oct. 31 – Nov. 2 in Portland, Oregon.

APIs

Learn tricks, shortcuts, and key lessons learned in creating a Developer Experience team, at APIStrat.

Many companies that provide an API also include SDKs. At SendGrid, such SDKs send several billions of emails monthly through SendGrid’s Web API. Recently, SendGrid re-built their seven open source SDKs (Python, PHP, C#, Ruby, Node.js, Java, and Go) to support 233 API endpoints, a process which I’ll describe in my upcoming talk at APIStrat in Portland.

Fortunately, when we started this undertaking, Matt Bernier had just launched our Developer Experience team, covering our open source documentation and libraries. I joined the team as the first Developer Experience Engineer, with a charter to manage the open source libraries in order to ensure a fast and painless integration with every API SendGrid produces.

Our first task on the Developer Engineering side was to update all of the core SendGrid SDKs, across all seven programming languages, to support the newly released third version of the SendGrid Web API and its hundreds of endpoints. At the time, our SDKs only supported the email sending endpoint for version 2 of the API, so this was a major task for one person. Based on our velocity, we calculated that it would take about 8 years to hand code every single endpoint into each library.

This effort involved automated integration test creation and execution with a Swagger/OAI powered mock API server, documentation, code, examples, CLAs, backlogs, and sending out swag. Along the way, we also gained some insights on what should not be automated — like HTTP clients.

In my talk at APIStrat, I am going to share some tricks, automations, shortcuts, and key lessons that I learned on our journey to creating a Developer Experience team:

  • We will walk through what we automated and why, including how we leveraged OpenAPI and StopLight.io to automate SDK documentation, code, examples, and tests.
  • Then we’ll dive into how we used CLA-Assistant.io to automate CLA signing and management along with Kotis’ API to automate sending and managing swag for our contributors.
  • We’ll explore how these changes were received by our community, how we adapted to their feedback and prioritized with the RICE framework.

If you’re interested in attending, please take a moment to register and sign up for my talk. I hope to see you there!

OpenStack Summit Sydney

OpenStack Summit Sydney offers 11+ session tracks and plenty of educational workshops, tutorials, panels. Start planning your schedule now.

Going to OpenStack Summit Sydney? While you’re there, be sure stop by The Linux Foundation training booth for fun giveaways and a chance to win a Raspberry Pi kit. The drawing for prizes will take place 1 week after the conference on November 15.

Giveaways include The Linux Foundation projects’ stickers, and free ebooks: The SysAdmin’s Essential Guide to Linux Workstation Security, Practical GPL Compliance, A Guide to Understanding OPNFV & NFV, and the Open Source Guide Volume 1.

With 11+ session tracks to choose from, and plenty of educational workshops, tutorials, panels — start planning your schedule at OpenStack Summit in Sydney now.

Session tracks include:

  • Architecture & Operations
  • Birds of a Feather
  • Cloud & OpenStack 101
  • Community & Leadership
  • Containers & Cloud-Native Apps
  • Contribution & Upstream Development
  • Enterprise
  • Forum
  • Government
  • Hands-on Workshop
  • Open Source Days
  • And More.

View the full OpenStack Summit Sydney schedule here.

Cloud Native Computing Foundation and Cloud Foundry will also have a booth at OpenStack Summit Sydney. Get your pass to OpenStack and stop by to learn more!

MesosCon

Sign up for free live video streaming of all keynote sessions at MesosCon Europe.

Can’t make it to MesosCon Europe in Prague this week? The Linux Foundation is pleased to offer free live video streaming of all keynote sessions on Thursday, Oct 26 and Friday, Oct 27, 2017.

MesosCon is an annual conference organized by the Apache Mesos community, bringing together users and developers to share and learn about the project and its growing ecosystem. Users, developers, experts, and community members will convene next week.

Apache Software Foundation, Mesosphere, and Netflix are among the many organizations that will keynote next week.

The livestream will begin on Thursday, Oct. 26 at 9 a.m. CEST (Central European Summer Time). Sign up now! You can also follow our live event updates on Twitter with #MesosCon.

All keynotes will be broadcasted live, including a welcome and opening remarks by Ben Hindman, Co-Creator, Apache Mesos and Founder, Mesosphere.

Other featured keynotes include:

  • Rich Bowen, VP Conferences, Apache Software Foundation will analyze The Apache Way.
  • Katharina Probst, Netflix will talk about making and keeping Netflix highly available.
  • SMACK in the enterprise panel.
  • Pierre Cheynier, Operations Engineer, Criteo will discuss operating 600+ Mesos servers on 7 data centers.
  • And more.

View the full schedule of keynotes.

Sign up now for the free live video stream.

Once you sign up, you’ll be able to view the livestream on the same page. If you sign up prior to the livestream day/time, simply return to this page and you’ll be able to view.

Open Source Summit EU

Going to Open Source Summit? Check out some featured conference presentations and activities below.

Going to Open Source Summit EU in Prague? While you’re there, be sure stop by The Linux Foundation training booth for fun giveaways and a chance to win one of three Raspberry Pi kits.

Giveaways include The Linux Foundation branded webcam covers, The Linux Foundation projects’ stickers, Tux stickers, Linux.com stickers, as well as free ebooks: The SysAdmin’s Essential Guide to Linux Workstation Security, Practical GPL Compliance, and A Guide to Understanding OPNFV & NFV.

You can also enter the raffle for a chance to win a Raspberry Pi Kit. There will be 3 raffle winners: names will be drawn and prizes will be mailed on Nov. 2.

And, be sure to check out some featured conference presentations below, including how to deploy Kubernetes native applications, deploying and scaling microservices, opportunities for inclusion and collaboration, and how to build your open source career.

Session Highlights

  • Love What You Do, Everyday! – Zaheda Bhorat, Amazon Web Services
  • Detecting Performance Regressions In The Linux Kernel – Jan Kara, SUSE
  • Highway to Helm: Deploying Kubernetes Native Applications – Michelle Noorali, Microsoft
  • Deploying and Scaling Microservices with Docker and Kubernetes – Jérôme Petazzoni, Docker
  • printk() – The Most Useful Tool is Now Showing its Age – Steven Rostedt, VMWare
  • Every Day Opportunities for Inclusion and Collaboration – Nithya Ruff, Comcast

Activities

  • Technical Showcase
  • Real-Time Summit
  • Free Day with Prague tour from local students
  • KVM Forum
  • FOSSology – Hands On Training
  • Tracing Summit

The Cloud Native Computing Foundation will also a have booth at OSSEU. Get your pass to Open Source Summit Europe and stop by to learn more! Use discount OSSEULFM20 code for 20% off your all-access attendee pass.

Check out the full list of co-located events on the website and register now.