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Join the Apache Mesos community in Prague for town halls, MesosCon university, and a full-day hackathon.

Get the latest on Apache Mesos with Ben Hindman, Co-Creator of Apache Mesos, at MesosCon Europe taking place October 25-27, 2017 in Prague, Czech Republic. At the conference, you’ll hear insights by industry experts deploying Mesos clusters, learn about containerization and security in Mesos, and more.

This annual conference brings together users and developers to share and learn about the Mesos project and its growing ecosystem. The conference features two days of sessions focused on the Apache Mesos Core and related technologies, as well as a one-day hackathon, town halls, and MesosCon University.  

Highlights include:

  • SMACK in the Enterprise keynote panel: Hear how the SMACK stack is impacting the data analytics landscape at large enterprises. Panelists will be announced soon.
  • MesosCon University: Tutorial-style sessions will offer hands-on learning for building a stateful service, operating your cluster, or bootstrapping a secure Mesos cluster.
  • Town Halls: A community gathering to discuss pressing needs and issues. The town halls will begin at 7:00pm after the onsite reception on Thursday, and will include drinks and appetizers sponsored by Mesosphere. Have a town hall you think we should run? Reach out to events@linuxfoundation.org.
  • Hackathon: Come and work on new Mesos features, new demos, new documentation, and win great prizes! The Hackathon will take place on Wednesday, October 25, and is included with your conference registration.  

View the full schedule of sessions and activities here.

Get a preview of what to expect at MesosCon Europe. Watch videos from MesosCon North America 2017 here.

Register now and use discount code MCEULDC17 to save $25 off your pass to MesosCon Europe.

Reuben Paul, co-founder of CyberShaolin, will speak at Open Source Summit in Prague, highlighting the importance of cybersecurity awareness for kids.

Reuben Paul is not the only kid who plays video games, but his fascination with games and computers set him on a unique journey of curiosity that led to an early interest in cybersecurity education and advocacy and the creation of CyberShaolin, an organization that helps children understand the threat of cyberattacks. Paul, who is now 11 years old, will present a keynote talk at Open Source Summit in Prague, sharing his experiences and highlighting insecurities in toys, devices, and other technologies in daily use.

Reuben Paul, co-founder of CyberShaolin

We interviewed Paul to hear the story of his journey and to discuss CyberShaolin and its mission to educate, equip, and empower kids (and their parents) with knowledge of cybersecurity dangers and defenses.  

Linux.com: When did your fascination with computers start?
Reuben Paul: My fascination with computers started with video games. I like mobile phone games as well as console video games. When I was about 5 years old (I think), I was playing the “Asphalt” racing game by Gameloft on my phone. It was a simple but fun game. I had to touch on the right side of the phone to go fast and touch the left side of the phone to slow down. I asked my dad, “How does the game know where I touch?”

He researched and found out that the phone screen was an xy coordinate system and so he told me that if the x value was greater than half the width of the phone screen, then it was a touch on the right side. Otherwise, it was a touch on the left side. To help me better understand how this worked, he gave me the equation to graph a straight line, which was y = mx + b and asked, “Can you find the y value for each x value?” After about 30 minutes, I calculated the y value for each of the x values he gave me.

“When my dad realized that I was able to learn some fundamental logics of programming, he introduced me to Scratch and I wrote my first game called “Big Fish eats Small Fish” using the x and y values of the mouse pointer in the game. Then I just kept falling in love with computers.Paul, who is now 11 years old, will present a keynote talk at Open Source Summit in Prague, sharing his experiences and highlighting insecurities in toys, devices, and other technologies in daily use.

Linux.com: What got you interested in cybersecurity?
Paul: My dad, Mano Paul, used to train his business clients on cybersecurity. Whenever he worked from his home office, I would listen to his phone conversations. By the time I was 6 years old, I knew about things like the Internet, firewalls, and the cloud. When my dad realized I had the interest and the potential for learning, he started teaching me security topics like social engineering techniques, cloning websites, man-in-the-middle attack techniques, hacking mobile apps, and more. The first time I got a meterpreter shell from a test target machine, I felt like Peter Parker who had just discovered his Spiderman abilities.

Linux.com: How and why did you start CyberShaolin?
Paul: When I was 8 years old, I gave my first talk on “InfoSec from the mouth of babes (or an 8 year old)” in DerbyCon. It was in September of 2014. After that conference, I received several invitations and before the end of 2014, I had keynoted at three other conferences.

So, when kids started hearing me speak at these different conferences, they started writing to me and asking me to teach them. I told my parents that I wanted to teach other kids, and they asked me how. I said, “Maybe I can make some videos and publish them on channels like YouTube.” They asked me if I wanted to charge for my videos, and I said “No.” I want my videos to be free and accessible to any child anywhere in the world. This is how CyberShaolin was created.

Linux.com: What’s the goal of CyberShaolin?
Paul: CyberShaolin is the non-profit organization that my parents helped me found. Its mission is to educate, equip, and empower kids (and their parents) with knowledge of cybersecurity dangers and defenses, using videos and other training material that I develop in my spare time from school, along with kung fu, gymnastics, swimming, inline hockey, piano, and drums. I have published about a dozen videos so far on the www.CyberShaolin.org website and plan to develop more. I would also like to make games and comics to support security learning.

CyberShaolin comes from two words: Cyber and Shaolin. The word cyber is of course from technology. Shaolin comes from the kung fu martial art form in which my dad and are I are both second degree black belt holders. In kung fu, we have belts to show our progress of knowledge, and you can think of CyberShaolin like digital kung fu where kids can become Cyber Black Belts, after learning and taking tests on our website.

Linux.com: How important do you think is it for children to understand cybersecurity?
Paul: We are living in a time when technology and devices are not only in our homes but also in our schools and pretty much any place you go. The world is also getting very connected with the Internet of Things, which can easily become the Internet of Threats. Children are one of the main users of these technologies and devices.  Unfortunately, these devices and apps on these devices are not very secure and can cause serious problems to children and families. For example, I recently (in May 2017) demonstrated how I could hack into a smart toy teddy bear and turn it into a remote spying device.
Children are also the next generation. If they are not aware and trained in cybersecurity, then the future (our future) will not be very good. 

Linux.com: How does the project help children?
Paul:As I mentioned before, CyberShaolin’s mission is to educate, equip, and empower kids (and their parents) with knowledge of cybersecurity dangers and defenses.

As kids are educated about cybersecurity dangers like cyber bullying, man-in-the-middle, phishing, privacy, online threats, mobile threats, etc., they will be equipped with knowledge and skills, which will empower them to make cyber-wise decisions and stay safe and secure in cyberspace.
And, just as I would never use my kung fu skills to harm someone, I expect all CyberShaolin graduates to use their cyber kung fu skills to create a secure future, for the good of humanity.

Improve the efficiency of your software development team with the RICE framework. Learn more at the upcoming APIStrat conference in Portland, Oregon.

The Developer Experience team at SendGrid is a small, but mighty force of two. We attempt to tackle every problem that we can get our hands on. This often means that some items get left behind.  At the outset, we surveyed everything that was going on in our open source libraries and we quickly realized that we needed to find a way to prioritize what we were going to work on. Luckily, our team lives, organizationally, on the Product Management team, and we had just received a gentle nudge and training on the RICE prioritization framework.

On our company blog, I wrote an article about how employing this framework, using a spreadsheet, helped us double our velocity as a team within the first sprint. Our development velocity doubled because the most impactful things for the time spent are not always the biggest things, but the biggest things tend to attract the most attention due to their size.

What is RICE?

RICE as an acronym stands for Reach x Impact x Confidence, all divided by Effort. This calculation allows you to get a score that weighs the following. Some of the definitions we use are a slight departure from Intercom’s original version, but this has been very effective for us!

The calculation:

Reach * Impact * Confidence

————————————–

               Effort

This gives us a score for every item in our list. Then, we sort our list in descending order by score. We realized, once we had a sorted list, that we accidentally made a Kanban backlog. We worked from the top of the list, keeping work in progress (WIP) to as much of a minimum as possible. WIP can be tough with open source, because we often have 20-30 issues waiting for a community member response. These items sit at the top of our backlog, and we look into them at the start of every day in the hope that we can clear them out of our WIP category.

Lessons Learned

Reach – The number of customers this will affect

One thing we learned about using RICE is making sure that we use consistent numbers for each of the variables in the calculation. It was very tempting for us, an email company, to use the “number of emails” sent as the Reach parameter. This worked until we started trying to evaluate tasks that didn’t have anything to do with our v3/mail/send endpoint. We eventually settled on number of customers using this library for this purpose”, calculating API user count and mail user count for the Reach.

Impact – A measure of the effect completing this project will have

It is easy to assume that every single item is a high or massive priority. It looks nice, gives you an ego boost, and totally messes up everything in your ranking system. Be honest with yourself about what is on your list. If things don’t really seem to be in the right place in your list (more on this below) then look at impact, because it’s probably artificially high, especially in context of the items around it in the list.

Confidence – How confident are we that we can sit down and complete this task today

We use a text-based selection from the list: None, Minimal, Low, Medium, High, and “with my eyes closed”.  These each translate into specific numbers for the calculation.

Effort – The number of story points will this take to complete

We use story points because this approach allows us to figure out the calendar length of a task rather than the aggregate of specific amounts of time spent on the task. To be more specific, this is the difference between “It’s going to take 3 hours” and “It will only take 3 hours of work, but it won’t be finished until Friday.” This is an easy trap to fall into, because new projects are exciting and we want to jump in and knock them out. That doesn’t mean that we can actually get a project that “will only take a couple days” done within the same month we started it. Life happens, your velocity calculation accounts for that — especially if you use an average over the last year (get out yer agile pitchforks!).

Letting the backlog win

We have learned the hard way with projects we really want to work on right now, that they are not always the right project at the moment. It is important to have confidence in the calculation and take the assumption that it is correct. That is, until you are looking at the list and realize that “Hey, item 15 really should be item 5. What’s going on here?” Look at your list in context of the other items, does the order feel correct? If not, why not?

We ended up using RICE as the baseline calculation for everything we do, but it is not the end-all. We added in calculation modifiers for company priority, due dates, and status — because something the executives have on the company roadmap, that has to be done in Q3, should be worked on right away. And, because we are using Kanban, the status of an item is important. Once you start something, it should stay at the top of the list until it is done, or you decide it is no longer necessary to complete it. Getting WIP completed, rather than backed up, is a good way to see the impact of your work and get a sense of accomplishment for yourself and your development team.

Matt Bernier is the Developer Experience Product Manager at SendGrid, where he spends most of his time digging into customer feedback in order to provide a World Class Experience for Developers with SendGrid.

Learn more in Matt Bernier’s talk — How We Doubled the Velocity of Our Developer Experience Team — at the APIStrat conference coming up Oct. 31 to Nov. 2 in Portland, Oregon.

The Kids Day Workshop at Open Source Summit in Los Angeles was organized by LA MakerSpace in conjunction with The Linux Foundation.

At this year’s Kids Day workshop at Open Source Summit in Los Angeles, The Linux Foundation collaborated with LA MakerSpace.org to provide kids with an introduction to coding ideas and approaches. The LA MakerSpace is heavily influenced by the maker culture, so they have a very hands-on approach when it comes to teaching coding.

Hands On

That hands-on approach was visible at the workshop through the use of a lot of real-life accessories. For example, the space featured a huge ball pit with sensors installed so kids could program the sensors and collect data. A cup of water was used as a switch; when you dipped your finger in the water, it sent a signal to turn a device on or off.  And, the kids used an open source Scratch program to learn coding.

Excitement at the Kids Day Workshop at Open Source Summit in Los Angeles.

I talked to some parents who accompanied their children and they were excited about the workshop. Most of the kids had some previous exposure to coding, but they said this experience was unique and fun.

One of the mothers I met at the event had a very strict policy about screen time and access to devices like the iPad. But she brought her daughter, Penelope, to the workshop so that she could be exposed to the “creative” side of such platforms. Penelope had tried coding in second grade and was very excited to be at the event.

Shelton and his mom at Kids Day. (Photo by Swapnil Bhartiya)

Shelton’s mom learned about the workshop from a Swiss friend that she hosted as an exchange student years ago. This friend knew of Shelton’s interest in coding and recommended the workshop. Shelton’s mom also suggested there could also be coding classes for parents so adults could also venture into new areas.

Alex’s dad is a system engineer at Walt Disney, and he brought Alex to the workshop to expose him to coding and software development. Alex plays a lot of games and his dad hoped that this workshop might help Alex develop an interest in that side of technology.

Mya Stark, Executive Director of LA Makerspace, who organized the event with her team members, said, “What LA MakerSpace does is that we are dedicated to everybody having equal access to learn technology skills.”

“The way that we are doing that primarily right now is that we work with the LA city and county public library systems, and we take our instructors, like you see there, out to the branches and we help kids learn things like coding, robotics, e-textile, stop-motion animation.”

Open Source Approach

However, Stark said, they came to the Kids Day workshop with a different approach, since it’s about Linux and open source. They looked at different possibilities to find something that was meant for kids. They picked Scratch because it’s a platform on which kids are collaborating all over the world. And it’s open source.

“Scratch is basically like GitHub in that you make a project, somebody else makes a project, and then you remix it, which is essentially like forking. And then kids are kind of interacting through that whole sphere with each other,” said Stark.

Stark’s team also invested a lot of time finding ways to create a group coding project at the Open Source Summit. Their focus was on something that was also going to be able to be played with kids around the world and contributed upon as well.

“What we’re hoping they take away is that they really learn how fun Scratch is, and that they want to continue it when they get home. If they didn’t have a Scratch account, now they’ll have one. They’ll be familiar with the platform. They’ll understand the collaborative nature of it and all the different things that they can find already on there that they can play with and tweak and make their own. So that would be the goal,” Stark said.

 

The upcoming APIStrat conference – Oct. 31-Nov. 2 in Portland – features three days of technical sessions, keynotes, and workshops.

The API Strategy & Practice conference (APIStrat) – taking place Oct. 31 through Nov. 2 in Portland – features three days of technical sessions, keynotes, and more, including several workshops providing hands-on learning opportunities. These sessions cover topics such as RESTful API integration, OpenID Connect, API security, and REST API testing.

Check out the following workshops happening at APIStrat:

Connect Your RESTful API to Hundreds of Others in Minutes (Zapier and other Integration Platforms) – Sean Matthews, Left Hook Digital

In this workshop, the Left Hook team will show how to connect your app to hundreds of others on Zapier’s platform in a matter of minutes. We’ll walk you through a quick integration, and then talk about the pros and cons of 30+ different integration platforms out there, as well as highlighting platforms upon which developers can build out their own API connectors today.

Creating Communication Applications using the Asterisk RESTFul Interface (ARI) – Chris Howard, Digium

The Asterisk RESTFul Interface (ARI) is an asynchronous API that lets developers build communications applications by exposing the raw primitive objects in Asterisk – channels, bridges, endpoints, media, etc. This presentation will provide information on getting started using ARI and provide a working demonstration of using the ARI to create a telephone application.

From 0 to  000s – Starting and Growing your Developer Program – Caroline Lewko, WIP

Learn the basics of starting a developer program from segmentation and polishing your personas, along with the seven most important onboarding activities. We will also include some extra special super sensory developer experience techniques.   

How Mature are You? A Developer Experience Maturity Model – Jenny Wanger, Arity, founded by Allstate

At Arity, we developed a maturity model for API programs to help you focus your time and effort on the areas that will provide the greatest value for your customers. We’ll go through the model together so you can score your company’s program. You’ll leave the session with a score and roadmap of how this can help you influence your stakeholders.

OpenID Connect Done the Right Way – Vinay Bhalerao, Red Hat

With the rise of mobile applications, OpenID Connect adoption has increased in the API market and is the preferred choice in API security. This workshop will help people to understand the differences between OAuth, JWT, and openID Connect and when to use the respective flows.

OWASP’s Latest Category – API Underprotection – Skip Hovsmith, CriticalBlue

In this workshop, you’ll learn about potential threats resulting from undersecured web APIs. You should gain a good understanding of the underprotected API problem, learn practical tips to improve your API security posture, and gain a sense of emerging tools and technologies that enable a significant step change in API security.

Simplify and Scale Your Connections To Data – William Broza, BitScoop Labs

The BitScoop platform radically simplifies data integration and streamlines the data and services development process with unified access to APIs, microservices, and more. Learn how to unify all internal and external data in your ecosystem under one API or SDK using our powerful and feature-rich iPaaS.

Starting with GTK – Julita Inca, UNI

GTK is a toolkit to create GUIs based on C program language. Glib and clutter are other technologies involved with GTK, and in this workshop, we’ll look at interactions with databases that support Linux (Fedora 25), such as SQLite or PostgreSQL. We can achieve at least four forms with an interaction of a database to build a system to register people in an event.

Super-Powered REST API Testing – James Messinger, Postman

In this workshop, I’ll show you just how easy – and dare I say, fun – it can be to test REST APIs. Whether you prefer the command line, a text editor, or a GUI, there are tools that will fit nicely into your workflow. Plus, you’ll leave with sample code and a working demo to get you started.

See the full APIStrat schedule here and register now!

One of my primary goals at The Linux Foundation is to foster innovation across the entire open source networking ecosystem. This involves coordinating across multiple open source projects and initiatives and identifying key areas for collaboration to create an open source networking stack.

We are working across the entire ecosystem with industry-leading partners — from developers to service providers to vendors — to unify various open source components and create solutions that will accelerate network transformation. As part of this journey, I am pleased to introduce Open Source Networking Days (OSN Days), a series of free events that are hosted and organized by local user groups and The Linux Foundation members, with support from our projects, including DPDK, FD.io, ONAP, OpenDaylight, OPNFV, PNDA, and others.

OSN Days are a fantastic opportunity for network developers and users to learn how ONAP, OPNFV, OpenDaylight  and other open source initiatives are changing NFV/SDN orchestration and networking solutions. Stops on the tour include: Paris, Milan, Stockholm, London, Tel Aviv, and Japan. Register today for an upcoming OSN Day in your region.

The day-long events will start with a plenary session where attendees will hear from site hosts and The Linux Foundation speakers on the state of the industry and the collaboration and touch points between projects that make up the open source networking stack. Presenters will also explore how business opportunities like 5G and IoT are enabled by network transformation.  In the afternoon, events may feature technical sessions, tutorials, demonstrations, and workshops that empower attendees to participate, contribute, and deepen their knowledge of open source networking.

Our first OSN Day kicks off October 9 in Paris, followed by stops in Milan (October 12), Stockholm (October 13), London (October 16), Tel Aviv (October 19), and Japan (October 19). Thanks to our incredible site hosts and sponsors Amdocs, ATOS, Cloudify, Ericsson, Huawei, NEC, Orange, Red Hat, SUSE, and Vodafone, along with our high-caliber roster of speakers, for helping to make these OSN Days a reality!

More details about the events, including site-specific agendas, registration info, and details on hotel and travel, can be found here: https://sites.google.com/linuxfoundation.org/osndays/home. If you have any questions, or would like to host an event yourself in the future, please email OSNDays@linuxfoundation.org.

Open Source Summit Europe is not far away! This year’s event — held Oct. 23-26 in Prague, Czech Republic — will feature a wide array of speakers, including open source community expert Jono Bacon, 11-year-old hacker Reuben Paul, and Linux creator Linus Torvalds.

At OS Summit Europe, you will have the opportunity to collaborate, share, learn, and connect with 2,000 technologists and community members, through keynote presentations, technical talks, and many other event activities.  

Confirmed keynote speakers for OS Summit Europe include:

  • Jono Bacon, Community/Developer Strategy Consultant and Author

  • Keila Banks, 15-year-old Programmer, Web Designer and Technologist, with her father Phillip Banks

  • Mitchell Hashimoto, Founder of HashiCorp and Creator of Vagrant, Packer, Serf, Consul, Terraform, Vault, and Nomad

  • Neha Narkhede, Co-founder & CTO, Confluent

  • Sarah Novotny, Program Manager, Kubernetes Community, Google

  • Reuben Paul, 11-year-old Hacker, CyberShaolin Founder and Cyber Security Ambassador

  • Imad Sousou, VP, Software Services Group & GM, Open Source Technology Center, Intel Corporation

  • Linus Torvalds, Creator of Linux and Git in conversation with Dirk Hohndel, VP, Chief Open Source Officer, VMware

  • Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation

The full schedule will be published in the next few weeks, and applications are now being accepted for diversity and needs-based scholarships.

Registration is discounted to $800 through August 27, and academic and hobbyist rates are also available. Linux.com readers receive an additional $40 off with code LINUXRD5. Register Now!

Open Source Summit North America is less than two months away! Join 2,000+ open source professionals Sept. 11-14 in Los Angeles, CA, for exciting keynotes and technical talks covering all things Linux, cloud, containers, networking, emerging open source technologies, and more.

Register now!

With your registration, you also get access to many special events throughout the four-day conference. Special events include:

  • New Speed Networking Workshop: Looking to grow your technical skills, get more involved in an open source community, or make a job change? This networking and mentoring session taking place Monday, Sept. 11 is for you!

  • New Recruiting Program: Considering a career move or a job change? This year we are making it easier than ever for attendees to connect with companies looking for new candidates.

  • Evening Events: Join fellow attendees for conversation, collaboration and fun at numerous evening events including the attendee reception at Paramount Studios featuring studio tours, live music, and dinner from LA favorites In-N-Out, Coolhaus, Pink’s and more!

  • Women in Open Source Lunch: All women attendees are invited to connect at this networking lunch, sponsored by Intel, on Monday, Sept. 11.

  • Dan Lyons Book Signing: Attendees will have the opportunity to meet author Dan Lyons on Tuesday, Sept. 12. The first 100 attendees will receive a free signed copy of his book Disrupted: My Misadventure in the Start-Up Bubble.

  • Thursday Summits & Tutorials: Plan to stay on September 14, to attend the Diversity Empowerment Summit (Hosted by HPE & Intel), Networking Mini-Summit or deep-dive tutorials – all included in your OSS NA registration!

  • New Executive Track: Full details coming soon on this special event, hosted by IBM, taking place Tuesday, Sept. 12.

  • Morning Activities for Attendees: Morning meditation, a 5K fun run, and a downtown Los Angeles sightseeing bus tour.

Check back for updates on even more activities, including our Attendee Partner Program, Kids Day (an opportunity for kids to learn Scratch programming, in partnership with LA Makerspace), and Puppy Pawlooza (enjoy playtime with shelter dogs thanks to our partnership with LA Animal Rescue).

Linux.com readers receive an additional $47 off with code LINUXRD5. Register now »

The Call For Papers (CFP) for MesosCon Europe is closing soon! Submit your proposal by July 28 for consideration.

MesosCon is an annual conference that brings together users and developers to share and learn about the project and its growing ecosystem. The conference will feature two days of sessions to learn more about the Apache Mesos core and related technologies. The program will include workshops to get started with Apache Mesos, keynote addresses from industry leaders, and sessions led by adopters and contributors.

Dates to Remember

  • CFP Close: July 28, 2017

  • CFP Notifications: August 28, 2017

  • Schedule Announced: August 30, 2017

Submit a proposal to speak at MesosCon Europe »

Suggested Topics

Here are a few examples of topics we would like to see:

  • Best practices and lessons on deploying and running Mesos at scale

  • Deep dives and tutorials into Mesos

  • Interesting extensions to Mesos (e.g., new communication models, support for new containerizers, new resource types and allocation models, etc.)

  • Improvements/additions to the Mesos ecosystem (packaging systems, monitoring, log aggregation, load balancing, service discovery, etc.)

  • New frameworks

  • Microservice design

  • Continuous delivery / DevOps (automating into production)

If you’re unsure about your proposal, or want some feedback or general advice, please don’t hesitate to reach out to us. We’ll be happy to help!

Our events are working conferences intended for professional networking and collaboration in the Linux community and we work closely with our attendees, sponsors, and speakers to help keep The Linux Foundation events professional, welcoming, and friendly.

Not interested in speaking but want to attend? Linux.com readers receive 5% off the “attendee” registration with code LINUXRD5.

Register for MesosCon North America »

Register for MesosCon Europe »

The upcoming Open Source Summit NA — Sept. 11-14 in Los Angeles — offers many exciting keynote presentations and technical talks covering a wide array of topics, including cloud computing, containers, networking, diversity, and more. And, it’s also host to several co-located events that provide even more opportunities for collaboration and learning. Here are some of the events taking place.

Hacking for Humanity — A Social Innovation Hackathon with Girls in Tech

The Linux Foundation has teamed up with Girls in Tech Los Angeles for a unique two-day hackathon program to tackle global challenges. We invite women and men across all fields, including developers, designers, product developers, and entrepreneurs to participate.

Date/Time: Thursday, September 14, 10:00 am – Friday, September 15, 6:00 pm

Location: Plaza I/II, JW Marriott LA Live

Registration Cost: Complimentary. Register Here!

How to Build Habit-Forming Products Workshop

Learn how to build repeat engagement in this in-depth product development strategy workshop presented by Nir Eyal, author of Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products. Eyal has constructed a practical framework and process for designing better products that gives product managers, designers, and marketers a new way for thinking of the necessary components of changing user behavior. Although no previous background is required, attendees are encouraged to come to the workshop with a product or business idea in mind.

Date: Thursday, September 14

Time: 6:30 – 9:30 pm

Location: Georgia I-II, JW Marriott LA Live

Registration Cost: $199 USD. Click here to register!

Kubernetes Core Concepts Live Training

This one-day course presented by Sebastien Goasguen serves as a crash course to learn the basics of Kubernetes. It is suitable for beginners and aimed at developers and system administrators who want to get started with Kubernetes. You will discover the Kubernetes architecture and how to install it. You will then learn how to use its basic primitives (i.e., pods, deployments and services) to build your own distributed application.

The course will be a mix of lectures, demos and hands-on exercises aimed at administrators and application developers who want to understand the overall architecture of a Kubernetes cluster and learn how to use Docker images in a Kubernetes cluster.

Date: Thursday, September 14

Time: 8:30 am – 5:00 pm

Location: Olympic 1, JW Marriott LA Live

Registration Cost: $429 USD. Pre-registration is required. Add this training to your existing Open Source Summit NA registration here.

Linux Security Summit

The Linux Security Summit (LSS) is a technical forum for collaboration between Linux developers, researchers, and end users. Its primary aim is to foster community efforts in analyzing and solving Linux security challenges.

Date: Thursday, September 14 – Friday, September 15

Time: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm (subject to change)

Location: Gold 4, JW Marriott LA Live

Registration Cost: $100 USD. You can add Linux Security Summit to your existing registration here. If you would like to attend Linux Security Summit only, please register here.

Moby Summit

The Moby Summit is a small collaborative event taking place on Thursday, September 14 alongside Open Source Summit North America. This summit is for container users who are actively maintaining, contributing or generally involved in the design and development of the Moby Project and its components: runC/ containerd, LinuxKit, Infrakit, SwarmKit, HyperKit, DataKit, VPNKit, Notary, libnetwork, etc.

Date: Thursday, September 14

Time: 8:00 am – 7:00 pm

Location: Diamond Ballroom 8/9/10, JW Marriott LA Live

Registration Cost: Purchase tickets for Moby Summit here! All revenue from ticket sales will be donated to a non-profit organization promoting diversity in the tech industry.

Open Source Entrepreneur Network Symposium

This one-day symposium is presented by John Mark Walker, Founder, Open Source Entrepreneur Network. Everyone uses open source now. It’s not so much a question of whether you use open source but how you optimize your usage and contributions. In this symposium, we will discuss the myriad of business models for selling open source-based products and services, investigate potential legal landmines around contributing to and using open source software, and look at best practices for incorporating the best of upstream open source innovation into your organization.

Date: Thursday, September 14

Time: 9:00 am – 4:00 pm

Location: Georgia I-II, JW Marriott LA Live

Registration Cost: $150 USD. Pre-registration is required. Add this symposium to your existing Open Source Summit NA registration here.

You can see the full schedule for Open Source Summit here.

Save $150 through July 30. Linux.com readers save an additional $47 with discount code LINUXRD5. Register now!