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open source reading list

Check out the list of 21 must-read books for open source program managers, recommended by members of the TODO Group.

Is your organization looking to build out an open source program or are you already managing one? If so, you’re probably already considering the kinds of tools and guidance that can make your program a holistic success. That is why, in this article series, we have been covering tools for managing open source programs and providing advice from leading experts.

Now, to take your program to the next level, we offer a free guide containing an essential open source reading list. This list can help any organization launch and maintain a thriving open source program.

Specifically, the guide provides 21 must-read books for open source program managers, recommended by members of the TODO Group. These books can help your organization build a strong foundation and avoid missteps in developing your open source program.

Advice from experts is key to running a successful open source program. “It took us years of constant discussion and negotiation to break from the traditional IT setup into a more flexible environment that supports our open source development,” said Ibrahim Haddad, Vice President of R&D and Head of the Open Source Group at Samsung Research. “We made it work for us and with enough persistence you also can make it work for your open source team.”

The book in this list provide expert advice on how to get your open source tool collection started, how to approach issues such as licensing and governance, and much more. “A well-designed open source compliance process should simultaneously ensure compliance with the terms of open source licenses and also help companies protect their own intellectual property and that of third-party suppliers from unintended disclosure and/or other consequences,” notes Haddad.

Here are just some of the titles on the essential open source reading list:

Codev2 by Lawrence Lessig: A classic treatise on Internet regulation and the role of code as a form of law

New Frontiers in Open Innovation by Henry William Chesbrough: A thorough examination of research conducted to date on open innovation

Managing 3rd-Party Software Licenses by Giles Middleton: Covers not only license types, but methods of handling and tracking components and their licenses

Open Source for Business: A Practical Guide to Open Source Software Licensing by Heather Meeker: A downloadable ebook on licensing and legal terms

Producing Open Source Software: How to Run a Successful Free Software Project by Karl Fogel: From your mission statement to project fruition, don’t miss these guidelines

The Art of Community: Building the New Age of Participation by Jono Bacon: Sound advice from one of the most respected of all community managers

The free reading list can help you navigate all kinds of common open source-related challenges. It covers everything from evaluating ROI to optimizing practices, and it explores how to seamlessly and safely leverage existing tools to complement your open source creations. It is one of a new collection of free guides from The Linux Foundation and The TODO Group that are targeted at organizations running open source programs or considering them.

The guides are available now and they can help you run an open source program office where open source is supported, shared, and leveraged. They can also, in many instances, keep your program out of trouble, where trouble can range from licensing skirmishes to lawsuits.

These free resources were produced based on expertise from open source leaders, including advice from many members of The TODO Group, which includes Autodesk, Comcast, Dropbox, Facebook, Google, Intel, Microsoft, Netflix, Red Hat, Salesforce, and Samsung.

Also, don’t miss the previous articles in the series:

How to Create an Open Source Program

Tools for Managing Open Source Programs

Measuring Your Open Source Program’s Success

Effective Strategies for Recruiting Open Source Developers

Participating in Open Source Communities

Using Open Source Code

Launching an Open Source Project: A Free Guide

Practical Ways to Improve Your Open Source Development Impact

Shuah Khan

Shuah Khan, of Samsung Research America, is a Linux kernel contributor and maintainer.

The Linux kernel development community remains extremely busy, as shown in the recent Linux Kernel Development Report, written by Jonathan Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman. Since the 4.7 release, just under 83,000 changesets have been merged from 4,319 individual developers representing 519 known corporations. Part of this busy development process involves the kernel testing infrastructure. According to the report, the “zero-day build and boot robot” system alone found 223 bugs (all of which were fixed) during the most recent reporting period. The in-kernel self-test framework continues to improve and will someday be a comprehensive test suite for the kernel.

Shuah Khan

Shuah Khan

Shuah Khan, Senior Linux Kernel Developer at Samsung Research America, is the maintainer of the kernel self-test framework. In this article, Khan answers a few questions about her work on the Linux kernel.

The Linux Foundation: What role do you play in the community and what subsystem(s) do you work on?

Shuah Khan: I maintain the Linux kernel self-test framework and USB-over-IP driver. I also contribute to the Linux Media, Power Management, IOMMU, and DMA areas. I publish articles related to the Linux kernel on the Samsung Open Source Group (OSG) blog and have previously written for the Linux Journal, where I authored a paper on Linux Kernel Testing and Debugging.

The Linux Foundation: What have you been working on this year? 

Khan: My main focus this year has been Exynos platform upstream stability, Kselftest framework and individual tests. I contributed to improving the quality of media subsystem core, and media and drm drivers on Exynos platform. I enhanced and improved the Kselftest framework by adding support for the Test Anything Protocol and object relocation. In addition, I boot tested stable kernel release candidates and maintained the Kselftest and USB-over-IP drivers.

The Linux Foundation: What do you think the kernel community needs to work on in the upcoming year?

Khan: The Linux Kernel community should continue its focus on adding support for new hardware, harden the security, and improve quality. Focusing on effective ways to proactively detect security vulnerabilities, race conditions, and hard-to-find problems will help towards achieving the above goals. As a process issue, community would have to take a close look at the maintainer to developer ratio to avoid maintainer fatigue and bottlenecks.

The Linux Foundation: Why do you contribute to the Linux kernel?

Khan: Contributing to the Linux kernel requires a unique set of skills in addition to the technical know-how. Contributors should be open to their ideas and work challenged and questioned, be ready to accept criticism, be open and flexible to evolve their ideas and work based on feedback from other contributors. It is an iterative process of review and refinement to evolve a fix or a feature that adds value to the kernel. I enjoy the technical challenges and being part of the community that works towards a common goal of making the Linux kernel better in each release.

You can learn more about the Linux kernel development process and read more developer profiles in the full report. Download the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report now.

dropbox

One of the most important things when building an open source community is making sure that your own processes are open, according to Dropbox’s Luke Faraone.

The open source program at Dropbox was initially just a mailing list, where some interested engineers wanted to open source projects and develop with open source. Over time, things became more formalized, with a focus on ensuring that the company was consistent about what code it would release versus what code was best kept internal.

They also wanted to ensure that the things they were releasing were things that would actually provide value.

“We set minimum standards for what we would release as open source projects, including a review process, and our program just started to drive a lot of value,” said Luke Faraone, Security Engineer at Dropbox.

What drives Dropbox’s open source program

It’s important to ensure that the metrics and goals you track are not just related to volume, such as measuring the number of open source projects that you’re releasing or the number of lines of code you’re releasing. Those sort of metrics don’t necessarily provide business value or community value.

“We make sure to be thoughtful with our program’s goals, focusing on things that either provide back some business through external contributions or otherwise indicate that others are getting value out of our projects,” said Faraone. “We want to make sure that the community is connected back to us. Also, it is good to make sure to have fun and not have a process that is too onerous. We want people to feel comfortable working with us, and we want to be partners with folks as they work on projects. Ensuring that we have good relationships is really important.”

How Dropbox measures community success with open source

One of the most important things when building an open source community is making sure that your own processes are open.

“The more transparent you can make your decision-making processes, the more of a sense of ownership your community will have. You also want to make sure that your process doesn’t become a blocker. If your open source process for either inbound or outbound contributions is onerous, people will look to bypass the process or simply decide that contributing is too difficult,” said Faraone.

How Dropbox tracks contribution and release metrics with open source

It is important to track metrics related to contributions to projects, including such questions as:

  • What rate of contribution are you getting on a per-contributor basis?
  • Do people tend to come back to contribute to particular projects or would they also be interested in contributing to other projects that we are involved with?
  • How likely is a contributor who provides one patch to come back?

At Dropbox, according to Faraone, they also monitor the time between releases and the amount of churn that occurs between releases, where the goal is to encourage releases early and often. They also check in with teams if they have gone several months without committing to a new version.

Zulip stands out

Among Dropbox’s open source successes — if you look at the number of contributions — a project called Zulip stands out. Zulip was an open source chat system that the company acquired in 2014, but eventually they decided that they wanted to release it to the community.

“As an open source project, members of the community had set up hosting services for the chat system, and we eventually sunsetted our hosted service. We offered all of our users an opportunity to elect to have their data migrated to one of the community-operated hosting providers. What’s really impressive is that the Zulip open source project has a higher commitment velocity than it did when it had 10 or 15 employees working on it full time,” said Faraone.

Key lessons for open source program managers

Faraone offers the following tips to help ensure success when developing an open source program.

  • Community involvement can often give a project higher commitment velocity than dedicating a lot of full time employees to the project.
  • In driving community around projects, it is critical to make sure that your own processes and decisions are open and not too onerous.
  • Track metrics related to community contributions closely, including whether contributors participate in more than one project, and whether releases are arriving early and often.
  • When compared to tracking community ecosystem health and evaluating whether your program is creating business value, tracking metrics such as lines of code created has less value.
  • Evaluate whether you are choosing highly restrictive licenses, and if you are, what impact that will have as you start receiving external contributions.

You can read more TODO group case studies on GitHub.

Arpit Joshipura, GM of Networking and Orchestration at the Linux Foundation, shares his 2018 predictions for the networking industry.

1. 2015’s buzzwords are 2018’s course curriculum.

SDN, NFV, VNF, containers, microservices — the hype crested in 2016 and receded in 2017. But don’t mistake quiet for inactivity; solution providers and users alike have been hard at work with re-architecting and maturing solutions for key networking challenges. And now that these projects are nearing production, these topics are our most requested areas for training.

2. Open Source networking is crossing the chasm – from POCs to Production.

The ability for users and developers to work side by side in open source has helped projects mature quickly — and vendors to rapidly deliver highly relevant solutions to their customers. For example:

3. Top networking vendors are embracing a shift in their business models…

  • Hardware-centric to software-centric: value-add from rapid customization
  • Proprietary development to open-source, shared development
  • Co-development with end users, reducing time to deployment from 2 years to 6 months

4. Industry-wide adoption of 1-2 Network Automation platforms will enable unprecedented mass customization.

The need to integrate multiple platforms, taking into account each of their unique feature sets and limitations, has traditionally been a massive barrier to rapid service delivery.

In 2018, mature abstractions and standardizing processes will enable user organizations to rapidly onboard and orchestrate a diverse set of best-of-breed VNFs and PNFs at need.

5. Advances in cloud and carrier networking are driving skills and purchasing shifts in the enterprise.

The ease and ubiquity of public cloud for simple workloads has reset end user expectations for Enterprise IT. The carrier space has driven maturity of open networking solutions and processes. Enterprise IT departments are now at a crossroads:

  • How many and which of their workloads and processes do they want to outsource?
  • How can they effectively support those workloads remaining in-house with the same ease and speed users expect?
  • What skills will IT staff need, and how will they get them?

Which brings us to….

6. Prediction #1 will also lead off our Predictions list for 2019.

This article originally appeared on the ONAP website.

open source marketing

In Deirdré Straughan’s talk at Open Source Summit, she explained common marketing approaches and why they’re important for open source projects.

The widely experienced and indefatigable Deirdré Straughan presented a talk at Open Source Summit NA on how to market an open source project. Deirdré currently works with open source at Amazon Web Services (AWS), although she was not representing the company at the time of her talk. Her experience also includes stints at Ericsson, Joyent, and Oracle, where she worked with cloud and open source over several years.

Through it all, Deirdré said, the main mission in her career has been to “help technologies grow and thrive through a variety of marketing and community activities.” This article provides highlights of Deirdré’s talk, in which she explained common marketing approaches and why they’re important for open source projects.

Why you have to market free stuff

So, what is marketing? At its most basic, she said, marketing is about getting people to exchange their money for goods and services. So you might think: “Marketing is about selling. Open source is free. I don’t have to try to sell anything, so why would I need marketing?”

open source marketing

Deirdré Straughan

But, you are selling something. You are selling ideas, and the currency you are requesting in return is something extremely valuable, which is people’s time and attention. That may feel counterintuitive, because open source generally means giving something away, but it does have substance and it does have worth. In fact, it is so worthwhile  that people contribute time, money, talent, and effort to the cause. However, they can only do that if they are aware of your project and convinced of the value of supporting it.

Additionally, competition is fierce, said Deirdré. To succeed, your project must compete for attention and support with some 25 and a half million other open source projects. Thus, open source marketing is about capturing very scarce attention and resources in a very crowded environment. It’s about attracting people and resources to your project, which can be difficult to do.

According to Deirdré, the main resource projects need is people — their time and effort. They may be people who use your project, or they may be contributors. Of those who are contributors, some will work independently, often in their spare time. Others may be assigned a project by their employer, or, as is increasingly common, be specifically hired to work on a particular open source project.

“And, yes, in some cases, you are also asking for money. We would all like to believe that pure technical goodness will be rewarded, and that we should never have to think about money. However, most of us need some money to survive,” she said.

Open source is increasingly supported by companies, but many companies are unsure about which projects to invest in. To succeed, your project needs to rise above the crowd and to attract not just independent contributors, but also companies that could offer material support.

Common points of failure in marketing

“Even so, marketing often fails to happen in open source. A common reason is that many people in tech despise marketing. But you shouldn’t automatically recoil from the mere mention of marketing, because you need to be doing it if you want to survive. It will be difficult to do marketing well, if you go into it thinking it’s sleazy,” Deirdré said.

Sometimes resistance to marketing comes from a literal machismo, according to Deirdré. Marketing is considered a soft skill, a job for women, as opposed to the (ahem) “manly” work of coding. It is perceived as a lower-status role (until you get to the VP or CMO level). Other reasons for lack of marketing involve lack of funding, or simply the fact that nobody working on a project happens to know how to do it.

At its best, Deirdré said, marketing helps people understand what the technology is about, and how they can use it. It is a form of  communication that is informative, truthful, convincing, and even inspiring.

Marketing tools

There are many marketing tools readily available. First in importance, Deirdré said, is your code. GitHub is your resumé. Your basic code should be architectured purposefully and offer the capability to write libraries or modules so that the barriers to entry for a newcomer are fairly low. It should be well coded and offer tools that help people learn to use and contribute to your project.  

A common pitfall relates to documentation. Many companies don’t bother with it, but documentation will help attract people to your project. Documentation usually explains all the commands and parameters and what the output means. This information is necessary, but insufficient. Additional types of documentation are needed, according to Deirdré, such as, white papers, blogs, video, podcasts, and conference talks.

Once you’ve created all this content, you need a place to put it. Obviously, a GitHub repo is necessary, but you’ll also need a website and/or wiki.

Discoverability is crucial, Deirdré said. You have created all this content, but people still have to find it. Toward that end, you should be cautious about project names. For example, if your project name is also a common word, searching for it is going to be difficult. To maximize results in a search engine, you can use keyword tags and categories that will help people find your project.

Search engine optimization is an arcane art. Being on the first page of search results for a keyword is extremely valuable. For that reason, “SEO best practice changes frequently, as search engines are in an arms race with the black hats who want to game search results,” she said. “You can easily find recent tips and tricks on how to improve your rankings. However, it usually takes about a year to make any real progress in search engine rankings. You’ll need patience.”

Community

Everything that touches the customer is marketing, Deirdré said. For example, consider airlines. Everything about the airline experience affects what consumers  think about the airline. From buying a ticket, the check-in process, boarding, the plane ride and experience, the atmosphere of the airport, timeliness in departures and arrivals, and whether luggage arrived on time and unscathed — all of these processes and experiences help shape the consumer’s opinion of the brand.

“This is also true for technology, and especially for communities and projects. Everything that somebody experiences around your project — good or bad — affects their perception of that project and whether they are going to want to participate in it,” she said.

So, community is important. Community culture is important, as is diversity.  Nurture your community. If your open source community is not diverse, ask yourself why, and think about how you can attract a wider range of participation.

Diversity also means diversity of contribution. Does your project recognize and value contribution beyond just the code? Again, you’re asking people to help you do this work, so make sure that they’re recognized for it.

Kindness also matters

Look closely at the newbie experience. What is it like onboarding someone to your technology? Think, too, about growing pains. Projects, like startups, can reach a critical inflection point, when there is rapid success but things start to fall apart, because there just aren’t enough people to respond quickly.

“In conclusion, I’d like you to take away that marketing is not evil. You may already be doing it. You just may not think of some of what you’re doing as marketing,” Deirdré said.

“And marketing, particularly that which is appropriate for open source, is mostly stuff you’re probably already doing, or at least know how to do. There are even people out there who would love to help. They’re just waiting to be asked.”

Deirdré Straughan is the Content Lead for the AWS Open Source Community Engagement team. Her work for AWS includes the new AWS Open Source blog and @AWSOpen on Twitter. You can find her at @deirdres on Twitter.

linux kernel

The top 30 Linux kernel developers have contributed about 16 percent of the total changes since the start of the Git era.

Since the beginning of the Git era (that is, the 2.6.11 release in 2005), a total of 15,637 developers have contributed to the Linux kernel, according to the recent Linux Kernel Development Report, written by Jonathan Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman.

Thomas Gleixner

Thomas Gleixner

The report states that, since the 2.6.11 release, the top 10 developers together have contributed 45,338 changes — almost 7.1 percent of the total. The top 30 developers contributed just under 16 percent of the total, as seen in the table below.

One of these top 30 developers is Thomas Gleixner, CTO at Linutronix GmbH, who serves in various kernel maintainer roles. In this article, Gleixner answers a few questions about his contributions to the Linux kernel.Linux kernel devs

Linux Foundation: What role do you play in the community and what subsystem(s) do you work on?

Thomas Gleixner: I serve various maintainer roles. The x86 architecture, the generic interrupt subsystem and the time(r) subsystem. Aside of that I’m leading the realtime preeemption project and overseeing the mainlining of it.

Linux Foundation: What’s one way you have contributed to the 4.8 to 4.13 releases?

Gleixner: Reviews and other maintainer duties, reworking CPU hotplug and the timer wheel, implementing the managed interrupt facility, helping the resource director technology support along and consolidation/cleanups all over the place.

Linux Foundation: What do you think the kernel community needs to work on in the upcoming year?

Gleixner: Aside of the technical challenges, which are hard to predict, we need more effort on code cleanup and consolidation along with more capacity for reviews.

Linux Foundation: Why do you contribute to the Linux kernel?

Gleixner: First of all, it’s fun, and I strongly believe that FOSS is the right way to go, but I freely admit that I also do it to earn my living.

You can learn more about the Linux kernel development process and read more developer profiles in the full report. Download the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report now.

This free guide can help you increase your development team’s efficacy through and with open source contributions.

Open source programs are sparking innovation at organizations of all types, and if your program is up and running, you may have arrived at the point where maximizing the impact of your development is essential to continued success. Many open source program managers are now required to demonstrate the ROI of their technology development, and example open source report cards from Facebook and Google track development milestones.

This is where the new, free Improving Your Open Source Development Impact guide can help. The aim of the guide is to help you increase your development team’s efficacy through and with open source contributions. By implementing some of the best practices laid out in the guide, you can:

  • Reduce the amount of work needed from product teams
  • Minimize the cost to maintain source code and internal software branches
  • Improve code quality
  • Produce faster development cycles
  • Produce more stable code to serve as the base for products
  • Improve company reputation in key open source communities.

Open source development requires a different approach than many organizations are accustomed to. But the work becomes easier if you have a clear plan to follow. Fortunately, a whole lot of companies and individuals have already forged a path to success in contributing to significant open source projects. They have tried and true methods for establishing a leadership role in open source communities.

This open source guide offers lessons for increasing open source development impact through specific examples. Contributing to the Linux kernel is one of the hardest challenges for open source developers. With that in mind, the guide uses this case as an example, but the lessons learned will apply to nearly any open source project you’ll work with.

“It took us years of constant discussion and negotiation to break from the traditional IT setup into a more flexible environment that supports our open source development,” said Ibrahim Haddad, Vice President of R&D and Head of the Open Source Group at Samsung Research. “We made it work for us and with enough persistence you also can make it work for your open source team.”

Common Challenges

Notably, organizations run into common problems as they try to improve the impact of their open source inventions. The figure below shows some of the challenges that dedicated open source teams face in an enterprise setting.open source guidesThe Improving Your Open Source Development Impact guide can help you navigate these and other common open source-related challenges. It covers everything from evaluating ROI to optimizing practices, and it explores how to seamlessly and safely leverage existing tools to complement your open source creations.

It is one of a new collection of free guides from The Linux Foundation and The TODO Group providing valuable insight and expertise for any organization running an open source program. The guides are available now to help you run an open source program office where open source is supported, shared, and leveraged.

Check out the all the guides, and don’t miss the previous articles in the series:

How to Create an Open Source Program

Tools for Managing Open Source Programs

Measuring Your Open Source Program’s Success

Effective Strategies for Recruiting Open Source Developers

Participating in Open Source Communities

Using Open Source Code

Launching an Open Source Project: A Free Guide

linux kernel development

Part of the ongoing Linux development work involves hardening the kernel against attack.

Security is paramount these days for any computer system, including those running on Linux. Thus, part of the ongoing Linux development work involves hardening the kernel against attack, according to the recent Linux Kernel Development Report.

This work, according to report authors Jonathan Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman, involves the addition of several new technologies, many of which have their origin in the grsecurity and PaX patch sets. “New hardening features include virtually mapped kernel stacks, the use of the GCC plugin mechanism for structure-layout randomization, the hardened usercopy mechanism, and a new reference-count mechanism that detects and defuses reference-count overflows. Each of these features makes the kernel more resistant to attack,” the report states.

Linux kernel

Kees Cook

In this series, we are highlighting some of the hard-working developers who contribute to the Linux kernel. Here, Kees Cook, Software Engineer at Google, answers a few questions about his work.

Linux Foundation: What role do you play in the community and what subsystem(s) do you work on?

Kees Cook: Recently, I organized the Kernel Self-Protection Project (KSPP), which has helped focus lots of other developers to work together to harden the kernel against attack. I’m also the maintainer of seccomp, pstore, LKDTM, and gcc-plugin subsystems, and a co-maintainer of sysctl.

Linux Foundation: What have you been working on this year?

Cook: I’ve been focused on KSPP work. I’ve assisted many other developers by helping port, develop, test, and shepherd things like hardened usercopy, gcc plugins, KASLR improvements, PAN emulation, refcount_t conversion, and stack protector improvements.

Linux Foundation: What do you think the kernel community needs to work on in the upcoming year?

Cook: I think we’ve got a lot of work ahead in standardizing the definitions of syscalls (to help run-time checkers), and continuing to identify and eliminate error-prone code patterns (to avoid common flaws). Doing these kinds of tree-wide changes continues to be quite a challenge for contributors because the kernel development model tends to focus on per-subsystem development.

Linux Foundation: Why do you contribute to the Linux kernel?

Cook: I’ve always loved working with low-level software, close to the hardware boundary. I love the challenges it presents. Additionally, since Linux is used in all corners of the world, it’s hard to find a better project to contribute to that has such an impact on so many people’s lives.

You can learn more about the Linux kernel development process and read more developer profiles in the full report. Download the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report now.

openchain

OpenChain makes open source compliance more predictable, understandable, and efficient for all participants in the software supply chain.

Communities form in open source all the time to address challenges. The majority of these communities are based around code, but others cover topics as diverse as design or governance. The OpenChain Project is a great example of the latter. What began three years ago as a conversation about reducing overlap, confusion, and wasted resources with respect to open source compliance is now poised to become an industry standard.

The idea to develop an overarching standard to describe what organizations could and should do to address open source compliance efficiently gained momentum until the formal project was born. The basic idea was simple: identify key recommended processes for effective open source management. The goal was equally clear: reduce bottlenecks and risk when using third-party code to make open source license compliance simple and consistent across the supply chain. The key was to pull things together in a manner that balanced comprehensiveness, broad applicability, and real-world usability.

Main Pillars of the Project

The OpenChain Project has three pillars supported by dedicated work teams. The OpenChain Specification defines a core set of requirements every quality compliance program must satisfy. OpenChain Conformance allows organizations to display their adherence to these requirements. The OpenChain Curriculum provides the educational foundation for open source processes and solutions, while meeting a key requirement of the OpenChain Specification. The result is that open source license compliance becomes more predictable, understandable, and efficient for all participants in the software supply chain.

Reasons to Engage

The OpenChain Project is designed to be useful and adoptable for all types of entities in the supply chain. As such, it is important to distill its value proposition for various potential partners. Our volunteer community created a list of five practical reasons to engage:

  1. OpenChain makes free and open source software (FOSS) more accessible to your developers. OpenChain provides a framework for shared, compliant use of FOSS. Conforming companies create an environment that supports use of FOSS internally and sharing of FOSS with partners.
  2. OpenChain reduces overall compliance effort, saving time and legal and engineering resources. OpenChain allows companies in a supply chain to work together toward FOSS compliance and provides a consistent standard to which all must perform. By contrast, in a typical supply chain, each member of the chain has to perform FOSS compliance for software of others in the chain, wasting time and resources in a duplication of effort.
  3. OpenChain may be adapted to your existing systems. OpenChain allows you to choose your own processes to meet its requirements. OpenChain provides resources that help you design new processes from the ground up, or you may choose to use the systems you have in place.
  4. OpenChain helps your business teams work together toward a common goal. OpenChain provides a blueprint for your legal, engineering, and business teams to work together toward FOSS compliance.
  5. OpenChain allows you to conform to a stable, community-backed specification. When you adopt OpenChain, you conform to a stable specification that is widely backed by industry and community participants. OpenChain was developed in an open, collaborative process, with contributors from a wide range of industries across Asia, Europe and North America. OpenChain is being formally adopted by a growing number of both small and larger companies.

Today, the OpenChain Project is addressing its goals and moving towards wider market adoption with the support of 14 Platinum members: Adobe, Arm, Cisco, Comcast, GitHub, Harman, Hitachi, HPE, Qualcomm, Siemens, Sony, Toyota, Western Digital, and Wind River. The project also has a broad community of volunteers helping to make open source compliance easier for a multitude of market segments. As we move into 2018, the OpenChain Project is well positioned for adoption by Tier 1, Tier 2, and Tier 3 suppliers in multiple sectors, ranging from embedded to mobile to automotive to enterprise to infrastructure.

Entities of all sizes are welcome to participate in the OpenChain Project. Everyone is welcome and encouraged to join our mailing list at:

https://lists.linuxfoundation.org/mailman/listinfo/openchain

You can also send private email to the Project Director, Shane Coughlan, at coughlan@linux.com.

Mauro Carvalho Chehab answers a few questions about his work on the Linux kernel.

According to the recent Linux Kernel Development Report, the Linux operating system runs 90 percent of the public cloud workload, has 62 percent of the embedded market share, and 100 percent of the TOP500 supercomputers. It also runs 82 percent of the world’s smartphones and nine of the top ten public clouds. However, the sustained growth of this open source ecosystem would not be possible without the steady development of the Linux kernel.

In this series, we are highlighting the ongoing work of some Linux kernel contributors. Here, Mauro Carvalho Chehab, Open Source Director at Samsung Research Brazil, answers a few questions about his work on the kernel.

Linux Foundation: What role do you play in the community and what subsystem(s) do you work on?

I’m responsible for the Open Source efforts at Samsung Research Brazil, as part of Samsung’s Open Source Group. I maintain the media and EDAC (Error Detection and Correction) kernel subsystems.

Linux Foundation: What have you been working on this year?

This year, I did a lot of patches that improves Linux documentation. A lot of them were related to the conversion from the XML-based DocBook docs to a markup language (Restructured Text). Thanks to that, no documents use the legacy document system anymore. I also finally closed the documentation gap at the DVB API, with was out of sync for more than 10 years! I also did several bug fixes at the media subsystem, including the 4.9 breakage of many drivers that were doing DMA via stack.

Linux Foundation: What do you think the kernel community needs to work on in the upcoming year?

We should continue our work to support new device drivers and get rid of out of tree stuff. At the media subsystem, we should work to add support for newer TV standards, like ATSC version 3 and to improve support for embedded systems, on both DVB and V4L2 APIs.

Linux Foundation: Why do you contribute to the Linux kernel?

Because it is fun! Seriously, I strongly believe that the innovation process on computer engineering is currently driven by Linux. Working on its kernel has provided me the opportunity of working with great developers and helping to improve the top operating system.

You can learn more about the Linux kernel development process and read more developer profiles in the full report. Download the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report now.