Posts

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OS Summit keynotes

Watch keynotes and technical sessions from OS Summit and ELC Europe here.

If you weren’t able to attend Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) Europe last week, don’t worry! We’ve recorded keynote presentations from both events and all the technical sessions from ELC Europe to share with you here.

Check out the on-stage conversation with Linus Torvalds and VMware’s Dirk Hohndel, opening remarks from The Linux Foundation’s Executive Director Jim Zemlin, and a special presentation from 11-year-old CyberShaolin founder Reuben Paul. You can watch these and other ELC and OS Summit keynotes below for insight into open source collaboration, community and technical expertise on containers, cloud computing, embedded Linux, Linux kernel, networking, and much more.

And, you can watch all 55+ technical sessions from Embedded Linux Conference here.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video link=”http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLQZzEvavGs&list=PLbzoR-pLrL6pISWAq-1cXP4_UZAyRtesk&index=1″][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video 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participating in open source

The Linux Foundation’s free online guide Participating in Open Source Communities can help organizations successfully navigate open source waters.

As companies in and out of the technology industry move to advance their open source programs, they are rapidly learning about the value of participating in open source communities. Organizations are using open source code to build their own commercial products and services, which drives home the strategic value of contributing back to projects.

However, diving in and participating without an understanding of projects and their communities can lead to frustration and other unfortunate outcomes. Approaching open source contributions without a strategy can tarnish a company’s reputation in the open source community and incur legal risks.

The Linux Foundation’s free online guide Participating in Open Source Communities can help organizations successfully navigate these open source waters. The detailed guide covers what it means to contribute to open source as an organization and what it means to be a good corporate citizen. It explains how open source projects are structured, how to contribute, why it’s important to devote internal developer resources to participation, as well as why it’s important to create a strategy for open source participation and management.

One of the most important first steps is to rally leadership behind your community participation strategy. “Support from leadership and acknowledgement that open source is a business critical part of your strategy is so important,” said Nithya Ruff, Senior Director, Open Source Practice at Comcast. “You should really understand the company’s objectives and how to enable them in your open source strategy.”

Building relationships is good strategy

The guide also notes that building relationships at events can make a difference, and that including community members early and often is a good strategy. “Some organizations make the mistake of developing big chunks of code in house and then dumping them into the open source project, which is almost never seen as a positive way to engage with the community,” the guide notes. “The reality is that open source projects can be complex, and what seems like an obvious change might have far reaching side effects in other parts of the project.”

Through the guide, you can also learn how to navigate issues of influence in community participation. It can be challenging for organizations to understand how influence is earned within open source projects. “Just because your organization is a big deal, doesn’t mean that you should expect to be treated like one without earning the respect of the open source community,” the guide advises.

The Participating in Open Source Communities guide can help you with these strategies and more, and it explores how to weave community focus into your open source initiatives. It is one of a new collection of free guides from The Linux Foundation and The TODO Group that provide essential information for any organization running an open source program. The guides are available now to help you run an open source program office where open source is supported, shared, and leveraged. With such an office, organizations can efficiently establish and execute on their open source strategies.

These guides were produced based on expertise from open source leaders. Check out the guides and stay tuned for our continuing coverage.

Don’t miss the previous articles in the series:

How to Create an Open Source Program

Tools for Managing Open Source Programs

Measuring Your Open Source Program’s Success

Effective Strategies for Recruiting Open Source Developers

documentation

At the upcoming APIStrat conference in Portland, Taylor Barnett will explore various documentation design principles and discuss best practices.

Taylor Barnett, a Community Engineer at Keen IO, says practice and constant iteration are key to writing good documentation.  At the upcoming API Strategy & Practice Conference 2017, Oct. 31 -Nov. 2 in Portland, OR, Barnett will explain the different types of docs and describe some best practices.

In her talk — Things I Wish People Told Me About Writing Docs — Barnett will look at how people consume documentation and discuss tools and tactics to enable other team members to write documentation.  Barnett explains more in this edited interview.

The Linux Foundation: What led you to this talk? Have you encountered projects with bad documentation?

Taylor Barnett: For the last year, my teammate, Maggie Jan, and I have been leading work to improve the developer content and documentation experience at Keen IO. It’s no secret that developers love excellent documentation, but many API companies aren’t always equipped with the resources to make that happen. As a result of this, we all come across a lot of bad documentation when you are trying to use developer tools and APIs.

The Linux Foundation: Often, there is a team of documentation writers and there are developers who wrote that piece of software; both are experts in their own fields, but they need a lot of collaboration to create usable docs. How can that collaboration be improved?

Barnett: In large companies, this can definitely be true, although in many companies documentation is still owned by various teams. The need for more collaboration still applies, though. One way to improve collaboration is bringing docs into the product development process early on. If you wait until everything is done and going to be released soon, people writing documentation are going to feel left out of the process and like an afterthought. If people working on the product development collaborate early on, not only does the product become better, but so does the documentation. People who are writing documentation usually spend some time figuring out the API or tool they are writing about, so they only get better when they can work with the people doing product development early on. Also, they can give great feedback from a user’s perspective much earlier in the process.

Another way to improve collaboration is to bring more people into the documentation review process. We do most of our documentation reviews in GitHub. It’s great to not only have someone in the role of an editor review it but also people from the Engineering or Product teams. It increases the number of eyes on the docs and helps make them better.

The Linux Foundation: How should developers approach documentation?

Barnett: Most developers are pretty familiar with the idea of Test Driven Development (TDD), but how familiar are they with Documentation Driven Development (DDD)? The flow for DDD is:

  1. Write or update documentation,
  2. Get feedback on that documentation,
  3. Write a failing test according to that documentation (TDD),
  4. Write code to pass the failing test,
  5. Repeat.

It can be an excellent way for developers to save a lot of time and prevent spending too much time on poorly designed features. As Isaac Schlueter, co-founder of npm, says about Documentation Driven Development, writing clear prose is an “effective way to increase productivity by reducing both the frequency and cost of mistakes.” Our brains can only hold so much information at once. In computer terms, our working memory size is pretty small. Writing down some of the information we are thinking about is a way to “off-load significant chunks of thought with hardly any data-loss,” while allowing us to think slower and more carefully.

For example: At Keen IO, we recently split our JavaScript library into three different modules. This decision was inspired by the documentation we were maintaining. We had tried to streamline the docs, but there was just too much to cover in an attention-constrained world. Many important details and features were hidden in the noise. For example, if all of the documentation was written sooner, we may have made this decision sooner.

Also, as a developer who is writing docs myself, constant iteration and practice are important. Your first version of the docs aren’t going to be great, but with focusing on trying to write clear prose, they will get better with time. Also, having another person who is not familiar with the product and can step through the documentation to review it is essential.

The Linux Foundation: If developers are writing documentation for other developers, how can they really think as the users?

Barnett: I used to think that developers are the best people to write docs for other developers because they are one of them. While I still believe this is partially true, some developers also assume a lot of knowledge. If it has been a while since a developer has done something, the “curse of knowledge” can exist. The more you know, the more you forget what it was like before. That’s why I like to talk about empathic documentation.

You need to empathize with the user on the other end. Don’t assume they know how to do something and give resources to fill in the steps that might seem “easy” to you. Also, hearing that something is “easy” or “simple” when something is not working on the user’s’ end is the worst feeling. It makes your users doubt themselves, feel frustrated, and a bunch of other negative emotions. Always try to remember you need to be empathetic!

The Linux Foundation: What’s the importance of tools in creating documentation?

Barnett: Very important! Earlier I mentioned using GitHub for reviews. I also would recommend having some continuous integration testing in place for your documentation site if you aren’t using a service like ReadMe or Apiary to make sure you don’t break it. A related topic is, do you build your own thing or use a service? Tools can be helpful, but they might not always be the best fit. You have to find a balance based on your current resources. Lastly, I would recommend checking out Anne Gentle’s book, Docs Like Code. She brings up tools a lot in the book.

The Linux Foundation: Who should attend your session?

Barnett: Everyone! Just kidding (kind of). If you are in any role that is developer facing like developer relations, evangelists, advocates, marketers, etc., if you are on a Product team for a developer focused product or platform, or if you are a developer or engineer who wants to write better docs.

The Linux Foundation: What is the main takeaway from your talk?

Barnett: Anyone can write docs, but with some practice, iteration, and working on different documentation writing skills anyone can write better docs.

Learn more in Taylor Barnett’s talk at the APIStrat conference coming up Oct. 31 – Nov. 2 in Portland, Oregon.

The 2017 Linux Kernel Report illustrates the kernel development process and highlights the work of some of the dedicated developers creating the largest collaborative project in the history of computing.

Roughly 15,600 developers from more than 1,400 companies have contributed to the Linux kernel since 2005, when the adoption of Git made detailed tracking possible, according to the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report released at the Linux Kernel Summit in Prague.

This report — co-authored by Jonathan Corbet, Linux kernel developer and editor of LWN.net, and Greg Kroah-Hartman, Linux kernel maintainer and Linux Foundation fellow — illustrates the kernel development process and highlights the work of some of the dedicated developers who are creating the largest collaborative project in the history of computing.

Jens Axboe, Linux block maintainer and software engineer at Facebook, contributes to the kernel because he enjoys the work. “It’s challenging and fun, plus there’s a personal gratification knowing that your code is running on billions of devices,” he said.

The 2017 report covers development work completed through Linux kernel 4.13, with an emphasis on releases 4.8 to 4.13. During this reporting period, an average of 8.5 changes per hour were accepted into the kernel; this is a significant increase from the 7.8 changes seen in the previous report.

Here are other highlights from the report:

  • Since the last report, more than 4,300 developers from over 500 companies have contributed to the kernel.
  • 1,670 of these developers contributed for the first time — about a third of contributors.
  • The most popular area for new developers to make their first patch is the “staging tree,” which is a place for device drivers that are not yet ready for inclusion in the kernel proper.
  • The top 10 organizations sponsoring Linux kernel development since the last report are Intel, Red Hat, Linaro, IBM, Samsung, SUSE, Google, AMD, Renesas, and Mellanox.

Kernel developer Julia Lawall, Senior Researcher at Inria, works on the Coccinelle tool that’s used to find bugs in the Linux kernel. She contributes to the kernel for many reasons, including “the potential impact, the challenge of understanding a huge code base of low-level code, and the chance to interact with a community with a very high level of technical skill.”

You can learn more about the Linux kernel development process and read more developer profiles in the full report. Download the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report now.

APIs

Learn tricks, shortcuts, and key lessons learned in creating a Developer Experience team, at APIStrat.

Many companies that provide an API also include SDKs. At SendGrid, such SDKs send several billions of emails monthly through SendGrid’s Web API. Recently, SendGrid re-built their seven open source SDKs (Python, PHP, C#, Ruby, Node.js, Java, and Go) to support 233 API endpoints, a process which I’ll describe in my upcoming talk at APIStrat in Portland.

Fortunately, when we started this undertaking, Matt Bernier had just launched our Developer Experience team, covering our open source documentation and libraries. I joined the team as the first Developer Experience Engineer, with a charter to manage the open source libraries in order to ensure a fast and painless integration with every API SendGrid produces.

Our first task on the Developer Engineering side was to update all of the core SendGrid SDKs, across all seven programming languages, to support the newly released third version of the SendGrid Web API and its hundreds of endpoints. At the time, our SDKs only supported the email sending endpoint for version 2 of the API, so this was a major task for one person. Based on our velocity, we calculated that it would take about 8 years to hand code every single endpoint into each library.

This effort involved automated integration test creation and execution with a Swagger/OAI powered mock API server, documentation, code, examples, CLAs, backlogs, and sending out swag. Along the way, we also gained some insights on what should not be automated — like HTTP clients.

In my talk at APIStrat, I am going to share some tricks, automations, shortcuts, and key lessons that I learned on our journey to creating a Developer Experience team:

  • We will walk through what we automated and why, including how we leveraged OpenAPI and StopLight.io to automate SDK documentation, code, examples, and tests.
  • Then we’ll dive into how we used CLA-Assistant.io to automate CLA signing and management along with Kotis’ API to automate sending and managing swag for our contributors.
  • We’ll explore how these changes were received by our community, how we adapted to their feedback and prioritized with the RICE framework.

If you’re interested in attending, please take a moment to register and sign up for my talk. I hope to see you there!

OpenStack Summit Sydney

OpenStack Summit Sydney offers 11+ session tracks and plenty of educational workshops, tutorials, panels. Start planning your schedule now.

Going to OpenStack Summit Sydney? While you’re there, be sure stop by The Linux Foundation training booth for fun giveaways and a chance to win a Raspberry Pi kit. The drawing for prizes will take place 1 week after the conference on November 15.

Giveaways include The Linux Foundation projects’ stickers, and free ebooks: The SysAdmin’s Essential Guide to Linux Workstation Security, Practical GPL Compliance, A Guide to Understanding OPNFV & NFV, and the Open Source Guide Volume 1.

With 11+ session tracks to choose from, and plenty of educational workshops, tutorials, panels — start planning your schedule at OpenStack Summit in Sydney now.

Session tracks include:

  • Architecture & Operations
  • Birds of a Feather
  • Cloud & OpenStack 101
  • Community & Leadership
  • Containers & Cloud-Native Apps
  • Contribution & Upstream Development
  • Enterprise
  • Forum
  • Government
  • Hands-on Workshop
  • Open Source Days
  • And More.

View the full OpenStack Summit Sydney schedule here.

Cloud Native Computing Foundation and Cloud Foundry will also have a booth at OpenStack Summit Sydney. Get your pass to OpenStack and stop by to learn more!

“Recruiting Open Source Developers” is a free online guide to help organizations looking to attract new developers or build internal talent.

Experienced open source developers are in short supply. To attract top talent, companies often have to do more than hire a recruiter or place an ad on a popular job site. However, if you are running an open source program at your organization, the program itself can be leveraged as a very effective recruiting tool. That is precisely where the new, free online guide Recruiting Open Source Developers comes in. It can help any organization in recruiting developers, or building internal talent, through nurturing an open source culture, contributing to open source communities, and showcasing the utility of new open source projects.

Why does your organization need a recruiting strategy? One reason is that the growing shortage of skilled developers is well documented. According to a recent Cloud Foundry report, there are a quarter-million job openings for software developers in the U.S. alone and half a million unfilled jobs that require tech skills. They’re also forecasting the number of unfillable developer jobs to reach one million within the next decade.

Appeal to motivation

That’s a problem, but there are solutions. Effective recruitment appeals to developer motivation. If you understand what attracts developers to work for you, and on your open source projects (and open source, in general) you can structure your recruitment strategies in a way that appeals to them. As the Recruiting Open Source developers guide notes, developers want three things: rewards, respect and purpose.

The guide explains that your recruitment strategy can benefit greatly if you initially hire people who are leaders in open source. “Domain expertise and leadership in open source can sometimes take quite a long time at established companies,” said Guy Martin, Director of Open at Autodesk. “You need to put training together and start working with people in the company to begin to groom them for that kind of leadership. But, sometimes initially you’ve got to bootstrap by hiring people who are already leaders in those communities.”

Train internal talent

Another key strategy that the guide covers is training internal talent to advance open source projects and communities. “You will want to spend time training developers who show an interest or eagerness in contributing to open source,” the guide notes. “It pays to cultivate this next level of developers and include them in the open source decision-making process. Developers gain respect and recognition through their technical contributions to open source projects and their leadership in open source communities.”

In addition, it makes a lot of sense to set up internal systems for tracking the value of contributions to open source. The goal is to foster pride in contributions and emphasize that your organization cares about open source.  “You can’t throw a stone more than five feet in the cloud and not hit something that’s in open source,” said Guy Martin. “We absolutely have to have open source talent in the company to drive what we’re trying to do moving forward.”

Startups, including those in stealth mode, can apply these strategies as well. They can have developers work on public open source projects to establish their influence and showcase it for possible incoming talent. Developers have choices in open source, so the goal is to make your organization attractive for the talent to apply.

Within the guide, Ibrahim Haddid (@IbrahimAtLinux) recommends the following strategies for advancing recruitment strategies:

  1. Hire key developers and maintainers from the open source projects that are important to you.
  2. Allow your developers working on products to spend a certain % of their time contributing upstream.
  3. Set up a mentorship program where senior and more experienced developers guide junior, less experienced ones.
  4. Develop and offer both technical and open source methodology training to your developers.
  5. Participate in open source events. Send your developers and support them in presenting their work.
  6. Provide proper IT infrastructure that will allow your developers to communicate and work with the global open source community without any challenges.
  7. Set up an internal system to track the contributions of your developers and measure their impact.
  8. Internally, plan on contributing and focus on areas that are useful to more than one business unit/ product line.

The Recruiting Open Source Developers guide can help you with all these strategies and more, and it explores how to weave open source itself into your strategies. It is one of a new collection of free guides from The Linux Foundation and The TODO Group that are all extremely valuable for any organization running an open source program. The guides are available now to help you run an open source program office where open source is supported, shared, and leveraged. With such an office, organizations can establish and execute on their open source strategies efficiently, with clear terms.

These guides were produced based on expertise from open source leaders. Check out the guides and stay tuned for our continuing coverage.

Also, don’t miss the previous articles in the series: How to Create an Open Source Program; Tools for Managing Open Source Programs; and Measuring Your Open Source Program’s Success.

Sunday I will partake in something I’ve never tried before: a Tough Mudder (TM).  If you’re not familiar with this event, it’s a 10-12 mile run with an obstacle about every half mile. Most people participate with a team, and it’s generally not timed.  It looks something like this:

(Electroshock Therapy – all pics from http://toughmudder.com)

I’ll admit I’m a little nervous. Will I be able to make it through the obstacles? What happens if I wear out and let my teammates down?

But I think I have a secret weapon. It’s not miles of running or hundreds of pull-ups and pushups. It’s not having the right gear…

It’s participating in open source.

Yep, I think that having participated in open source – specifically in the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) project where I’m on the TSC — will be the differentiator in helping me get through the Tough Mudder.  It all comes down applying what I’ve learned in open source to the obstacles along the way…

Lesson #1: You’re going to get dirty

Open source is not always a clean process.  It doesn’t run top-down like software development inside of most companies. There will be things that go wrong. People will have differences of opinion. You have to expect it and find a way to work through it. In ONAP we had to merge two different projects (OpenECOMP and Open-O) into our first release due in November. There was overlap between the projects, and (naturally) pride of ownership.  But the community made the tough decisions and did the hard work to bring the best of each project into the final product.

Knowing I’m going to get dirty, I’m now prepared for the Mud Mile…

Lesson #2:  It can be intimidating

If you’ve never worked in open source before, getting involved can be intimidating. Everyone seems so smart, what can I possibly contribute?  I’ve learned that you can start small with documentation, testing, or easy bug fixes, and as you build up your reputation, you can take on more responsibility.

Knowing that it can be intimidating, I’m now ready for the King of the Swingers.

Lesson #3: You can do things that you’ve never imagined

The great thing about open source is that it’s often tackling new and interesting problems. Many of the best new technologies today are coming from open source, and if you participate, you can say that you helped build it. In ONAP, we’re working on making the network virtualized & running it at a scale never seen, while still keeping the 100-year-old expectation that the network will always work. Big stuff.

Knowing that I can do things I never imagined, I’m ready for Funky Monkey the Revolution

(OK, maybe not… that looks really hard)

Lesson #4: If you work as a team, you can accomplish your goal

Possibly the best part about open source is how people work together for a common goal — not just a group from a single company, but people from around the globe. In the ONAP project, it’s not unusual to be on calls with people from China, India, France, Canada, and the US all at once. Some of us are even competitors. But, we know that only by working together can we build great software and make automated NFV (Network Function Virtualization) a reality.

Knowing that not just my team, but all Tough Mudders will have my back, I’m ready to tackle the Pyramid Scheme.

So, wish me luck on Sunday. If my open source lessons fail me, then I guess it means I should’ve done more pullups!

This article originally appeared on LinkedIn.

MesosCon

Sign up for free live video streaming of all keynote sessions at MesosCon Europe.

Can’t make it to MesosCon Europe in Prague this week? The Linux Foundation is pleased to offer free live video streaming of all keynote sessions on Thursday, Oct 26 and Friday, Oct 27, 2017.

MesosCon is an annual conference organized by the Apache Mesos community, bringing together users and developers to share and learn about the project and its growing ecosystem. Users, developers, experts, and community members will convene next week.

Apache Software Foundation, Mesosphere, and Netflix are among the many organizations that will keynote next week.

The livestream will begin on Thursday, Oct. 26 at 9 a.m. CEST (Central European Summer Time). Sign up now! You can also follow our live event updates on Twitter with #MesosCon.

All keynotes will be broadcasted live, including a welcome and opening remarks by Ben Hindman, Co-Creator, Apache Mesos and Founder, Mesosphere.

Other featured keynotes include:

  • Rich Bowen, VP Conferences, Apache Software Foundation will analyze The Apache Way.
  • Katharina Probst, Netflix will talk about making and keeping Netflix highly available.
  • SMACK in the enterprise panel.
  • Pierre Cheynier, Operations Engineer, Criteo will discuss operating 600+ Mesos servers on 7 data centers.
  • And more.

View the full schedule of keynotes.

Sign up now for the free live video stream.

Once you sign up, you’ll be able to view the livestream on the same page. If you sign up prior to the livestream day/time, simply return to this page and you’ll be able to view.

 

Open Source Summit livestream

The Linux Foundation is pleased to offer free live video streaming of all keynote sessions at Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference Europe, Oct. 23 to Oct. 25, 2017.

Join 2000 technologists and community members next week as they convene at Open Source Summit Europe and Embedded Linux Conference Europe in Prague. If you can’t be there in person, you can still take part, as The Linux Foundation is pleased to offer free live video streaming of all keynote sessions on Monday, Oct. 23 through Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017.  So, you can watch the event keynotes presented by Google, Intel, and VMware, among others.

The livestream will begin on Monday, Oct. 23 at 9 a.m. CEST (Central European Summer Time). Sign up now! You can also follow our live event updates on Twitter with #OSSummit.

All keynotes will be broadcasted live, including talks by Keila Banks, 15-year-old Programmer, Web Designer, and Technologist with her father Philip Banks; Mitchell Hashimoto, Founder, HashiCorp Founder of HashiCorp and Creator of Vagrant, Packer, Serf, Consul, Terraform, Vault and Nomad; Jan Kizska, Senior Key Expert, Siemens AG; Dirk Hohndel, VP & Chief Open Source Officer, VMware in a Conversation with Linux and Git Creator Linus Torvalds; Michael Dolan, Vice President of Strategic Programs & The Linux Foundation; and Jono Bacon, Community/Developer Strategy Consultant and Author.

Other featured conference keynotes include:

  • Neha Narkhede — Co-Founder & CTO of Confluent will discuss Apache Kafka and the Rise of the Streaming Platform
  • Reuben Paul — 11-year-old Hacker, CyberShaolin Founder and cybersecurity ambassador will talk about how Hacking is Child’s Play
  • Arpit Joshipura — General Manager, Networking, The Linux Foundation who will discuss Open Source Networking and a Vision of Fully Automated Networks
  • Imad Sousou — Vice President and General Manager, Software & Services Group, Intel
  • Sarah Novotny — Head of Open Source Strategy for GCP, Google
  • And more

View the full schedule of keynotes.

And sign up now for the free live video stream.

Once you sign up to watch the event keynotes, you’ll be able to view the livestream on the same page. If you sign up prior to the livestream day/time, simply return to this page and you’ll be able to view.