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At organizations of all types, launching and maintaining successful open source programs has become a business priority. A strong open source program office helps to ensure that open source is supported, nurtured, shared, explained, and leveraged. With such an office, organizations can establish and execute on their open source strategies in clear terms.

With all this in mind, The Linux Foundation and The TODO Group (Talk Openly Develop Openly) have published a free collection of detailed open source guides to aid companies developing open source programs. The guides are available to you now, and this is the first in a series of articles that can introduce you to the value of the guides.

How to Create an Open Source Program is the first of the guides, and it explores everything from the role of the open source program office to how successful open source programs at companies like Google function. The guide also includes insights and advice from open source experts, including John Mark Walker, Founder of the Open Source Entrepreneur Network, and Will Norris, Open Source Office Manager at Google.

“The open source program office is an essential part of any modern company with a reasonably ambitious plan to influence various sectors of software ecosystems,” notes Walker, in the guide. “If a company wants to increase its influence, clarify its open source messaging, maximize the clout of its projects, or increase the efficiency of its product development, a multifaceted approach to open source programs is essential.”

The How to Create an Open Source Program guide makes clear that there is not a one-size-fits-all approach to creating a successful program. In fact, Google’s Norris notes that stakeholders from individual business units play a key role in how open source projects advance at Google.

“We allow the various business units around the company to make the decision on whether it makes sense to open source a given project from a business perspective, because there’s a lot of different reasons why you might open source a project or a piece of code,” he notes. “We’re comfortable with allowing projects to take the approach that works for them given their goals. We play more of a role of facilitating and advising.”

The first guide lays out recommendations for how to include stakeholders ranging from Legal to Engineering in the maintenance of a program office. It also delves into the importance of setting clear program policies and observing compliance guidelines.

“Having a well-defined policy in place, that’s great, but it’s got to be a well-defined minimal policy,” said Jeff Mcaffer, director of the Open Source Programs Office at Microsoft, who was interviewed for the first guide. “Otherwise you get lawyers, security folks, business folks, all piling in their concerns and constraints. Soon you end up with a straitjacket full of policy that basically means that nobody can do anything.”

These free guides are extremely valuable for any organization setting up an open source program. Notably, the guides were not produced in a vacuum. Far from it. The advice you will find in them grew organically out of many interviews with some of the world’s leading open source experts. We strongly encourage you to check out the guides, and stay tuned to this space for more articles in this series.

 

The upcoming APIStrat conference – Oct. 31-Nov. 2 in Portland – features three days of technical sessions, keynotes, and workshops.

The API Strategy & Practice conference (APIStrat) – taking place Oct. 31 through Nov. 2 in Portland – features three days of technical sessions, keynotes, and more, including several workshops providing hands-on learning opportunities. These sessions cover topics such as RESTful API integration, OpenID Connect, API security, and REST API testing.

Check out the following workshops happening at APIStrat:

Connect Your RESTful API to Hundreds of Others in Minutes (Zapier and other Integration Platforms) – Sean Matthews, Left Hook Digital

In this workshop, the Left Hook team will show how to connect your app to hundreds of others on Zapier’s platform in a matter of minutes. We’ll walk you through a quick integration, and then talk about the pros and cons of 30+ different integration platforms out there, as well as highlighting platforms upon which developers can build out their own API connectors today.

Creating Communication Applications using the Asterisk RESTFul Interface (ARI) – Chris Howard, Digium

The Asterisk RESTFul Interface (ARI) is an asynchronous API that lets developers build communications applications by exposing the raw primitive objects in Asterisk – channels, bridges, endpoints, media, etc. This presentation will provide information on getting started using ARI and provide a working demonstration of using the ARI to create a telephone application.

From 0 to  000s – Starting and Growing your Developer Program – Caroline Lewko, WIP

Learn the basics of starting a developer program from segmentation and polishing your personas, along with the seven most important onboarding activities. We will also include some extra special super sensory developer experience techniques.   

How Mature are You? A Developer Experience Maturity Model – Jenny Wanger, Arity, founded by Allstate

At Arity, we developed a maturity model for API programs to help you focus your time and effort on the areas that will provide the greatest value for your customers. We’ll go through the model together so you can score your company’s program. You’ll leave the session with a score and roadmap of how this can help you influence your stakeholders.

OpenID Connect Done the Right Way – Vinay Bhalerao, Red Hat

With the rise of mobile applications, OpenID Connect adoption has increased in the API market and is the preferred choice in API security. This workshop will help people to understand the differences between OAuth, JWT, and openID Connect and when to use the respective flows.

OWASP’s Latest Category – API Underprotection – Skip Hovsmith, CriticalBlue

In this workshop, you’ll learn about potential threats resulting from undersecured web APIs. You should gain a good understanding of the underprotected API problem, learn practical tips to improve your API security posture, and gain a sense of emerging tools and technologies that enable a significant step change in API security.

Simplify and Scale Your Connections To Data – William Broza, BitScoop Labs

The BitScoop platform radically simplifies data integration and streamlines the data and services development process with unified access to APIs, microservices, and more. Learn how to unify all internal and external data in your ecosystem under one API or SDK using our powerful and feature-rich iPaaS.

Starting with GTK – Julita Inca, UNI

GTK is a toolkit to create GUIs based on C program language. Glib and clutter are other technologies involved with GTK, and in this workshop, we’ll look at interactions with databases that support Linux (Fedora 25), such as SQLite or PostgreSQL. We can achieve at least four forms with an interaction of a database to build a system to register people in an event.

Super-Powered REST API Testing – James Messinger, Postman

In this workshop, I’ll show you just how easy – and dare I say, fun – it can be to test REST APIs. Whether you prefer the command line, a text editor, or a GUI, there are tools that will fit nicely into your workflow. Plus, you’ll leave with sample code and a working demo to get you started.

See the full APIStrat schedule here and register now!

The Linux operating system was created some 26 years ago by a young Finnish engineer, and it now powers the global economy. Not only has Linux survived for more than quarter of a century, it continues to grow its influence and dominance.

Not all open source software projects thrive, however; many promising projects die untimely deaths. So, what’s unique about projects like Linux that thrive where others fail? What’s the secret sauce that sustains one project over others? Is it the community? The license? The code? The organizations backing it?

We talked to open source veteran Brian Behlendorf, co-founder of the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) and current Executive Director of the Hyperledger project, for some answers to these questions. Here is an edited version of the interview conducted at Open Source Summit North America in Los Angeles.

What are the core components of sustainable open source projects?

Brian Behlendorf: By definition, any open source project that is still alive needs some critical mass of developers contributing to it.  The Linux kernel is 25+ years old, and it still sees 5,000 new lines of code every day. It’s still such an incredibly active project.

In my book, that means you need this body of maintainers and contributors who are willing to continue to nurture the project even as it goes into adolescence and later life.

For me, the only way to more or less guarantee that happens is to see that there are companies out there who are making money off of open source software. They have embedded it at the core of their business. And even if it’s not what they do as a business, it’s still something that they need. So they’ll provide feedback, contribute, and continue to invest in shepherding it forward.

So, having companies use and contribute to your project and in return inject resources does help. What role do non-profit organizations like The Linux Foundation and ASF play?

Behlendorf: What The Linux Foundation, I think, has figured out, is how to identify these technology spaces, bring companies together around them, and then help them make money from it and profit from it.

But it’s not the only viable model. The Apache Software Foundation model is entirely volunteer driven, with developers even doing things like running the books or doing marketing.

There’s an incredibly empowering side to that, but it doesn’t always work. There weren’t enough developers who showed up around OpenOffice, for example, for that to work for the Apache OpenOffice community.

It’s almost hard to say if any model is better than the others. They’re all very unique for the kind of software being built and the developers who are attracted to that software.

You talked about commercialization of open source, yet we have seen that some open source communities are averse to the idea of any commercial or corporate links.

Behlendorf: I don’t think there was really ever a truly long tradition of a battle between open source developers and commercial interests. I think many of the people I know who were contributing to open source even before me were building businesses on top of it. Michael Tiemann built Cygnus on top of the GNU compiler suite. So this template, and every ISP, every web business is building on top of open source web components.

I think the real battle might have been between proprietary software and free software. And the real question was, did we need to vanquish proprietary software in order for free software to flourish?

Do licenses play any role in sustainability of open source projects?

Behlendorf: I tend to think of companies that have played games with licensing. There’s not a lot of successful examples out there. Why don’t we just put these kind of games to the side? Let’s build the software we need together, and go out and build great applications and great websites and great other things on top of that.

And this is what we carried forward in the Hyperledger project as well. All the Hyperledger code is under an Apache license. All of it is designed to be embedded inside of other people’s products and services.

We want to see lots of cloud hosts running Hyperledger technology. We want to see a lot of application developers embedding this inside and, say, putting it inside of cars or IoT sensors or those sorts of things. The less time that we have to spend with lawyers and with MBAs explaining to them how and why they can make money with this code, the better off we all are.

Diversity is necessary for the survival of organisms, can the same be said for open source projects?

Behlendorf: If your community doesn’t look like the global community, then something’s wrong. 

The blockchain movement is a great example of diversity. India and China and Europe have been running as fast with this technology as anybody in the United States. We are constantly looking at what countries are we visiting. Where are our companies based? How do we go and empower those companies in a country like China or a country like India, to go and be champions of what they’re doing, of the technology that they’re building?

What about culture?

Behlendorf: I’d say the final thing I’d throw out about sustainability is if your project isn’t comprised of people who are nice to each other, it’s not going to be very sustainable. Even the smartest people, even the most enthusiastic people will burn out if the dynamic in the community is very harsh, or if every time a good idea is brought up you hear crickets or somebody talks it down. You need to be nice to each other on an open source project in order to have any hope of being sustainable.

One of my primary goals at The Linux Foundation is to foster innovation across the entire open source networking ecosystem. This involves coordinating across multiple open source projects and initiatives and identifying key areas for collaboration to create an open source networking stack.

We are working across the entire ecosystem with industry-leading partners — from developers to service providers to vendors — to unify various open source components and create solutions that will accelerate network transformation. As part of this journey, I am pleased to introduce Open Source Networking Days (OSN Days), a series of free events that are hosted and organized by local user groups and The Linux Foundation members, with support from our projects, including DPDK, FD.io, ONAP, OpenDaylight, OPNFV, PNDA, and others.

OSN Days are a fantastic opportunity for network developers and users to learn how ONAP, OPNFV, OpenDaylight  and other open source initiatives are changing NFV/SDN orchestration and networking solutions. Stops on the tour include: Paris, Milan, Stockholm, London, Tel Aviv, and Japan. Register today for an upcoming OSN Day in your region.

The day-long events will start with a plenary session where attendees will hear from site hosts and The Linux Foundation speakers on the state of the industry and the collaboration and touch points between projects that make up the open source networking stack. Presenters will also explore how business opportunities like 5G and IoT are enabled by network transformation.  In the afternoon, events may feature technical sessions, tutorials, demonstrations, and workshops that empower attendees to participate, contribute, and deepen their knowledge of open source networking.

Our first OSN Day kicks off October 9 in Paris, followed by stops in Milan (October 12), Stockholm (October 13), London (October 16), Tel Aviv (October 19), and Japan (October 19). Thanks to our incredible site hosts and sponsors Amdocs, ATOS, Cloudify, Ericsson, Huawei, NEC, Orange, Red Hat, SUSE, and Vodafone, along with our high-caliber roster of speakers, for helping to make these OSN Days a reality!

More details about the events, including site-specific agendas, registration info, and details on hotel and travel, can be found here: https://sites.google.com/linuxfoundation.org/osndays/home. If you have any questions, or would like to host an event yourself in the future, please email OSNDays@linuxfoundation.org.

This week in open source news, AGL reveals new infotainment platform, mainstream enterprises derive the most benefit from OSS, and more! Read on to stay on top of the latest open source news. 

1) Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) recently revealed the latest infotainment platform along with a new Virtualization Expert Group (EG-VIRT) to develop a virtualized architecture.

Linux Foundation Focuses on Bringing Virtualization to Your Car– RCRWireless News

2) “Combing through the last few quarters of earnings transcripts, it’s clear that open source has arrived…but to very different destinations, depending on the company.”

Open Source is Driving Digital Transformation, According to Mainstream Businesses– Tech Republic

3) Amazon Web Services joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), (open source home of the Kubernetes project,) as a Platinum Member.

AWS joins the Cloud Native Computing Foundation– TechCrunch

4) “On August 24 and 25, the Ubuntu Desktop team will be holding a “Fit and Finish Sprint,” where they will aggressively test GNOME.”

Canonical Needs Your Help Transitioning Ubuntu Linux From Unity to GNOME– BetaNews

5) The VoltaStream Zero (an open source integrated audio module in the same form as a Raspberry Pi Zero) has launched.

Raspberry Pi Zero Clone: This Open Source Board Offers Chromecast-Quality Sound– ZDNet

This week in OSS and Linux news, two opinion writers at The New York Times consider the safeguards of open source software in future elections, Prodip Sen of HP shares the growing role of OPNFV, and more! Read on to stay in the open source know this week. 

1) The National Association of Voting Officials is leading a movement to encourage officials to stop purchasing insecure systems and use open source software to “guard our votes against manipulation.”

To Protect Voting, Use Open-Source Software– New York Times

2) As NFV becomes more central in transitioning to 5G, so too does OPNFV.

OPNFV’s Role in NFV Testing and the Road to 5G– Telecom TV

3) Microsoft continues trend towards being more open with new CNCF Platinum membership.

Microsoft Expands Role In Cloud By Joining Cloud Native Computing Foundation– Forbes

4) Windows 10 users will be able to run an array of Linux software this Fall.

Windows 10 Will Let Everyone Run Linux Inside Windows Following Fall Creators Update– TechRepublic

5) The effort to save Adobe Flash continues.

GitHub Developer Starts Petition to Open Source Adobe Flash– Computer Business Review

The newly announced schedule for the API Strategy & Practice Conference (APIStrat) — taking place Oct. 31 to Nov. 2 in Portland, Oregon — includes keynotes, workshops, technical talks, and more focused on the API economy. Jointly hosted by the Open API Initiative and The Linux Foundation, this conference brings together developers, IT teams, business users, and executives to discuss opportunities and challenges in the API space.

The conference program includes the following keynote speakers:

  • Yina Arenas – Microsoft

  • Glenn Block – Auth0

  • Adam Duvander – Zapier

  • Sarah Novotny – Google

APIStrat aims to spark conversations between API providers and API consumers, startups and enterprise, developers, architects, and integrators. The conference session tracks and topics include:

  • Beyond REST

  • Civic

  • Design

  • Hypermedia

  • Machine Learning

  • Management

  • Microservices

  • Protocols

  • SDK & Clients

  • Security

  • Standards & Definitions

  • Success Stories

  • Testing

  • Transformation

  • Usability

View the full lineup of all APIStrat speakers and sessions.

Registration is discounted by $300 through August 31, and academic rates are also available. In addition, applications are being accepted for diversity and need-based scholarships.

Linux.com readers receive an additional $25 off their registration with discount code LINUXRD5. Register now!

Open Source Summit Europe is not far away! This year’s event — held Oct. 23-26 in Prague, Czech Republic — will feature a wide array of speakers, including open source community expert Jono Bacon, 11-year-old hacker Reuben Paul, and Linux creator Linus Torvalds.

At OS Summit Europe, you will have the opportunity to collaborate, share, learn, and connect with 2,000 technologists and community members, through keynote presentations, technical talks, and many other event activities.  

Confirmed keynote speakers for OS Summit Europe include:

  • Jono Bacon, Community/Developer Strategy Consultant and Author

  • Keila Banks, 15-year-old Programmer, Web Designer and Technologist, with her father Phillip Banks

  • Mitchell Hashimoto, Founder of HashiCorp and Creator of Vagrant, Packer, Serf, Consul, Terraform, Vault, and Nomad

  • Neha Narkhede, Co-founder & CTO, Confluent

  • Sarah Novotny, Program Manager, Kubernetes Community, Google

  • Reuben Paul, 11-year-old Hacker, CyberShaolin Founder and Cyber Security Ambassador

  • Imad Sousou, VP, Software Services Group & GM, Open Source Technology Center, Intel Corporation

  • Linus Torvalds, Creator of Linux and Git in conversation with Dirk Hohndel, VP, Chief Open Source Officer, VMware

  • Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation

The full schedule will be published in the next few weeks, and applications are now being accepted for diversity and needs-based scholarships.

Registration is discounted to $800 through August 27, and academic and hobbyist rates are also available. Linux.com readers receive an additional $40 off with code LINUXRD5. Register Now!

This week in Linux and open source, Microsoft’s new CNCF membership represents the company’s ongoing love for open source, Adobe Flash is the subject of enthusiast rescue mission, and much more

1) Microsoft continues its Linux lovefest with new CNCF membership.

Microsoft Further Pledges Linux Loyalty by Joining Cloud Native Computing Foundation– Beta News

2) While Adobe is “mercy killing” Flash, enthusiasts are hoping for an open source lifeboat.

Adobe Flash Fans Want a Chance to Fix Its One Million Bugs Under an Open Source License– Gizmodo

3) A project intended to “develop open source technology and standards for “computational contracting” for the legal world that deploys blockchain technology” is getting ready for liftoff

Accord Project’s Consortium Launching First Legal ‘Smart Contracts’ With Hyperledger– Forbes

4) Version 60 of Google Chrome has been released for Linux and features security fixes, developer-related changes, and more

Google Chrome 60 Released for Linux, Mac, and Windows– Bleeping Computer

5) SambaCry doesn’t just favor Linux…

Creators Of SambaCry Linux Malware Also Have A Windows Backdoor Program– Forbes

The upcoming Open Source Summit NA — Sept. 11-14 in Los Angeles — offers many exciting keynote presentations and technical talks covering a wide array of topics, including cloud computing, containers, networking, diversity, and more. And, it’s also host to several co-located events that provide even more opportunities for collaboration and learning. Here are some of the events taking place.

Hacking for Humanity — A Social Innovation Hackathon with Girls in Tech

The Linux Foundation has teamed up with Girls in Tech Los Angeles for a unique two-day hackathon program to tackle global challenges. We invite women and men across all fields, including developers, designers, product developers, and entrepreneurs to participate.

Date/Time: Thursday, September 14, 10:00 am – Friday, September 15, 6:00 pm

Location: Plaza I/II, JW Marriott LA Live

Registration Cost: Complimentary. Register Here!

How to Build Habit-Forming Products Workshop

Learn how to build repeat engagement in this in-depth product development strategy workshop presented by Nir Eyal, author of Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products. Eyal has constructed a practical framework and process for designing better products that gives product managers, designers, and marketers a new way for thinking of the necessary components of changing user behavior. Although no previous background is required, attendees are encouraged to come to the workshop with a product or business idea in mind.

Date: Thursday, September 14

Time: 6:30 – 9:30 pm

Location: Georgia I-II, JW Marriott LA Live

Registration Cost: $199 USD. Click here to register!

Kubernetes Core Concepts Live Training

This one-day course presented by Sebastien Goasguen serves as a crash course to learn the basics of Kubernetes. It is suitable for beginners and aimed at developers and system administrators who want to get started with Kubernetes. You will discover the Kubernetes architecture and how to install it. You will then learn how to use its basic primitives (i.e., pods, deployments and services) to build your own distributed application.

The course will be a mix of lectures, demos and hands-on exercises aimed at administrators and application developers who want to understand the overall architecture of a Kubernetes cluster and learn how to use Docker images in a Kubernetes cluster.

Date: Thursday, September 14

Time: 8:30 am – 5:00 pm

Location: Olympic 1, JW Marriott LA Live

Registration Cost: $429 USD. Pre-registration is required. Add this training to your existing Open Source Summit NA registration here.

Linux Security Summit

The Linux Security Summit (LSS) is a technical forum for collaboration between Linux developers, researchers, and end users. Its primary aim is to foster community efforts in analyzing and solving Linux security challenges.

Date: Thursday, September 14 – Friday, September 15

Time: 9:00 am – 5:00 pm (subject to change)

Location: Gold 4, JW Marriott LA Live

Registration Cost: $100 USD. You can add Linux Security Summit to your existing registration here. If you would like to attend Linux Security Summit only, please register here.

Moby Summit

The Moby Summit is a small collaborative event taking place on Thursday, September 14 alongside Open Source Summit North America. This summit is for container users who are actively maintaining, contributing or generally involved in the design and development of the Moby Project and its components: runC/ containerd, LinuxKit, Infrakit, SwarmKit, HyperKit, DataKit, VPNKit, Notary, libnetwork, etc.

Date: Thursday, September 14

Time: 8:00 am – 7:00 pm

Location: Diamond Ballroom 8/9/10, JW Marriott LA Live

Registration Cost: Purchase tickets for Moby Summit here! All revenue from ticket sales will be donated to a non-profit organization promoting diversity in the tech industry.

Open Source Entrepreneur Network Symposium

This one-day symposium is presented by John Mark Walker, Founder, Open Source Entrepreneur Network. Everyone uses open source now. It’s not so much a question of whether you use open source but how you optimize your usage and contributions. In this symposium, we will discuss the myriad of business models for selling open source-based products and services, investigate potential legal landmines around contributing to and using open source software, and look at best practices for incorporating the best of upstream open source innovation into your organization.

Date: Thursday, September 14

Time: 9:00 am – 4:00 pm

Location: Georgia I-II, JW Marriott LA Live

Registration Cost: $150 USD. Pre-registration is required. Add this symposium to your existing Open Source Summit NA registration here.

You can see the full schedule for Open Source Summit here.

Save $150 through July 30. Linux.com readers save an additional $47 with discount code LINUXRD5. Register now!