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Watch the keynotes LIVE next week at Open Source Summit & ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe.

Open Source Summit & ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe is taking place in Edinburgh, UK next week, October 22-24, 2018. Can’t make it? You’ll be missed, but you don’t have to miss out on the action. Tune into the free livestream to catch all of the keynotes live from your desktop, tablet or phone! Sign up now >>

Hear from the leading technologists in open source! Get an inside scoop on:

  • An update on the Linux Kernel
  • Diversity & inclusion to fuel open source growth
  • How open source is changing banking
  • How to build an open source culture within organizations
  • Human rights & scientific collaboration
  • The future of AI and Deep Learning
  • The future of energy with open source
  • The parallels between open source & video games

Live video streaming of the keynote sessions from Open Source Summit & ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe will take place during the following times:

Monday, October 22

9:00 – 10:20 (BST)

Watch keynotes from Open Invention Network, LF Energy, Intel, LWN.net, and The Linux Foundation.

Tuesday, October 23

9:00 – 10:20 (BST)

Watch keynotes from Vibrant Data, Microsoft, IBM, and Human Rights Data Analysis Group.

Wednesday, October 24

9:00 – 10:00 (BST)

Watch keynotes from Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, IBM, and Mifos Initiative.

View the full keynote schedule >>

Sign up for free live stream now >>

ONS livestream

Watch the keynote sessions LIVE next week at ONS Europe!

Open Networking Summit Europe is taking place in Amsterdam next week,  September 25-27. Can’t make it? You’ll be missed, but you don’t have to miss out on the action. Tune into the free livestream to catch all of the keynotes live from your desktop, tablet or phone! Sign Up Now >>

Live video streaming of the keynote sessions from Open Networking Summit Europe 2018 will take place during the following times:

Tuesday, September 25

13:15 – 14:55 (CEST)

Watch keynotes from Cloud Native Computing Foundation, Red Hat, China Mobile, Intel, Orange Group Network and The Linux Foundation.

Wednesday, September 26

9:00 – 10:30 (CEST)

Watch keynotes from Türk Telekom, IBM, IHS/Infonetics Research, Huawei, China Mobile, and Vodafone Group.

Thursday, September 27

9:00 – 10:35 (CEST)

Watch keynotes from Deutsche Telekom AG, Imperial College London, China Mobile, AT&T, and Amdocs, Huawei, VMware and The Linux Foundation.

View the full Keynote Session Schedule

Sign up for free live stream now >>

Call for Code

Learn more about IBM’s open source initiatives, including the Call for Code.

Dr. Angel Diaz is the face of open source at IBM as Vice President of Developer Technology, Open Source & Advocacy. At the recent Open Source Summit in Vancouver, we spoke with Diaz to talk about the importance of open source at IBM and how it’s changing the world around us.

LF: What’s the importance of open source in the modern economy?

Angel Diaz: We are living in a technology-fueled business renaissance — cloud, data, artificial intelligence, and the redefinition of the transaction. There is constant democratization of technology. This democratization allows us as computer scientists to innovate higher orders of the stack. You don’t have to worry about compute, storage and network; you get that in the cloud for example, but what has been driving that democratization? Open source.

Angel Diaz, Vice President of Developer Technology, Open Source & Advocacy, IBM (Image copyright: Swapnil Bhartiya)

Open source has been the fuel, the innovation engine, the skills engine, the level playing field that allows us as a society to build more, to build faster and move forward and the rate and pace of that is increasing.

What’s really nice about that is we are doing it in a controlled way with open governance and leveraging all the work that we do in consortia such as the Linux Foundation.

LF: Today, open source has become so pervasive that the question isn’t who is using it, but who is not using it. Can you point to some moments in history that changed everything and the industry realized that this is the right path for innovation, collaboration, and development?

Diaz: That’s a great question. I think there are two such moments. I addressed it in my talk here. The first such moment was in the late eighties, early nineties when, as an industry, we came together and rallied around things like Linux, Apache, Eclipse.

Our products have upwards of 75 percent open source. We are not leeches; we contribute as much as we use. Back in the nineties, we protected open source with intellectual property. It fueled innovation as it gave people the permission and freedom to go ahead and contribute without any worry.

That’s a pivot point number one. Time occurred and a lot of stardust happened. Over the past 10 years or so, we started to create centers of gravity around cloud data, artificial intelligence, transactions and so on.

These centers of gravity came together in consortia with open governance models. This is really important because what that allowed us to do was to create an open architecture and open cloud architecture.

There is one more moment, the third moment where we are now. It’s about individuals. The individual really matters and there are so many new computer scientists across a diverse set of underrepresented groups that it’s exploding.

How we behave in open source is important and that boils down to being a mentor for others. It’s around code, content, and community. So I think the next renaissance of open source is going to be grounded in our ability to connect those three things and help people celebrate their education process, their ability to connect with others like them to be mentored. And then conduct mentoring themselves.

LF: While everything looks rosy, there are some challenges.  Can you elaborate?

Diaz: Nothing is ever rosy. There’s always a lot of work as blood, sweat, and tears – the individual contributor doing the pull requests, submitting code. It’s a lot of work. If we can stick to the company side of the equation, I see organizations think that open source is something that they monetize quickly and that’s not the reality. It’s about creating an ecosystem where everybody monetizes. People need to understand the difference between a real open source, which is a meritocracy based system where everybody can contribute, vs closed source where an organization controls everything tightly. Open source is about open governance – it is not about controlling the commit process.

LF: Once in a while, we see the case of open source companies trying to change the license to survive, as they try to monetize quickly. Do you worry that we might go backward and return to proprietary software?

Diaz: No, I don’t think so. I think the process is pretty well understood, and organizations that adopt the open governance model are successful. I think there’s enough momentum. It’s just a matter of companies understanding how to behave in that world.

LF: How important is open source for IBM?

Diaz: Open source has been in our DNA for a long time, probably more than any other company that I know of. I joined IBM in the mid-nineties at IBM research. I got involved with open source in the early days working with Tim Berners-Lee on web standards. I worked on Linux and many other open source projects. Open source is how we like to create ecosystems and skills. That’s how we drive innovation for our clients helping them to be more productive.

LF: Does open source have any impact beyond the IT world?

Diaz: Yes. In fact, just recently IBM partnered up with United Nations Human Rights, The American Red Cross, and The Linux Foundation to launch something called Call for Code.

It’s not just about the code; it’s about how you use the code for good. We have launched a worldwide hack which ends on September 28, 2018. There’s still time to participate. But Call for Code is the place where developers can submit code and win a contest for good. This year we’re preparing for disasters. It is from what I can see the world’s largest hack ever, and it’s focused for the greater good. I think that really puts a good light on open source.

LF: So it’s not coding for the sake of coding, it’s for some greater good?

Diaz: Exactly. Think about it. We are going to put the winning entries into production. If it’s an app, or whatever gets built, saves one life, it’s worth it. It’ll probably save tens, hundreds, maybe thousands of lives.

IBM has committed to the project for five years. It’s just been incredible to see tens of thousands of developers registering, participating and being part of this endeavor. It doesn’t matter if you’re a developer or a data scientist or even if you’re just a subject matter expert or someone who cares about preparing for disasters, sign up and register because teams are forming. Someone may need somebody who is a professional on hurricanes, you can help. The best teams that I know of are multidisciplinary. It’s not just for developers. Join!

This article was sponsored by IBM and written by The Linux Foundation.

OSN Days

OSN Days are a series of one-day events to facilitate F2F collaboration. Tours this fall cover China, APAC, and North America starting October 12.

As we gear up the for the first ever Open Networking Summit Europe event, Amsterdam, September 25-27, it’s becoming clear to me just how far we’ve come this year since the formation of LF Networking. With new major operators joining, like Deutsche Telekom, and others requiring open source project automation tools in their RFPs, like Orange, it’s inspiring to witness just how much the networking industry is rallying around open source and incorporating it as a key element of their business strategies. It’s great to see LF Networking recognized for its role in bringing the ecosystem together, and to see open source community contribution increasingly recognized as driving increased business value.

At The Linux Foundation, we believe strongly in face-to-face collaboration. For those who can’t make it to Amsterdam this time, I wanted to share the good news that the next three Open Source Networking Days (OSN Days) tours will be coming this fall to China, APAC, and North America. Here are confirmed cities and dates so far. Click on the links to learn more and register. Check back soon to main OSN Days website for updates on the others.

China: Shanghai: Oct 12 | Nanjing: Oct 15 | Beijing: Oct 17

APAC: Singapore: Oct 15 | Taiwan: (Hsinchu): Oct 17 | Tokyo: Oct 23

North America: Ottawa: Oct 30 | Bay Area: Nov 1 | Dallas: Nov 6 | Toronto: Nov 8 | Boston: Nov 19 | Montreal: Nov 29 | Austin: TBD

Launched last year, OSN Days is a series of regional, one-day events hosted and organized by local open source networking ecosystem members — including industry, service providers, academia, and start-ups — with support from LF Networking and its projects: FD.io, ONAP, OpenDaylight, OPNFV, PNDA, SNAS, and Tungsten Fabric. Attendees will hear from a roster of expert speakers on the state of the industry; the projects that make up the open source networking stack, the integration points between them, the use cases and business opportunities enabled by network transformation, how to get involved, and much more. This is also a great chance to hear directly from — and engage directly with — operators such as AT&T, China Mobile, China Telecom, China Telecom, and Reliance Jio.

There is no cost to attend and I invite you to register today. If you have any questions, or would like to host an event in the future, please email osndays@linuxfoundation.org.

Whether at ONS Europe, OSN Days, or the other industry events and meetups on our calendar, we hope to get the chance to meet with you soon and build upon the great work we’ve started. It’s a good time to be in networking.

hyperledger

Join us Wednesday, September 26, 2018 9:00 a.m. Pacific for an introductory webinar showing how to deploy Hyperledger Fabric.

Deploying a multi-component system like Hyperledger Fabric to production is challenging. Join us Wednesday, September 26, 2018 9:00 a.m. Pacific for an introductory webinar, presented by Alejandro (Sasha) Vicente Grabovetsky and Nicola Paoli of AID:Tech.

Why should you care?

Hyperledger Fabric is rather awesome, but deploying a distributed network has been known to give headaches and even migraines. In this talk, we will not be providing you with a guillotine that forever gets rid of these headaches, but instead we will talk you through some tools that can help you deploy a functioning, production-ready Hyperledger Fabric network on a Kubernetes cluster.

Who should attend?

Ideally, you are a Dev, an Ops or a DevOps interested in learning more about how to deploy Hyperledger Fabric to Kubernetes.

You might know a little bit about Hyperledger Fabric and about Docker containers and Kubernetes. We assume limited knowledge and will do our best to as possible and explain and demystify all the components along the way.

What we will talk about?

In this webinar, we will lower the threshold so that you can deploy your very own Hyperledger Fabric network onto Kubernetes. So what is each of these?

Hyperledger Fabric is a permissioned (unlike the permissionless Ethereum network) framework, allowing you to create consortium Blockchain networks, where one or more organisations share an immutable ledger of records and smart contracts (called “chaincode” in Hyperledger Fabric).

Kubernetes is a platform for deploying microservices (i.e. containerised applications, typically using Docker) applications on a cluster, such that the applications:

  • use fewer resources than when using dedicated (bare metal or virtual) machines for each component,
  • are self-healing, such that failed containers are restarted
  • and are configured in a declarative rather than procedural way, making them robust

We do this by using a set of Helm Charts. Rather than using a monolithic Helm Chart for the whole deployment, we use separate charts for each Hyperledger Fabric component, namely the Certificate Authority, Peer, CouchDB and Orderer. We demonstrate how to get these charts working together to provide a unified blockchain system.

Along the way, we will explain the different concepts you need to understand your Hyperledger Fabric network:

  • What is a Certificate Authority?
  • Why is the network split across Orderers and Peers?
  • And what are CouchDB and Apache Kafka doing in all of this?

We’ll also guide you in the right direction to other resources you can look at to expand your understanding on how Hyperledger Fabric works, including:

  • the official EdX course and our upcoming chapter on Composer,
  • Sasha’s own course on Hyperledger Fabric and Composer, and
  • we will be using the Helm Charts (Kubernetes packages) we created to make our own lives easier.

When and where?

The webinar will be running on Wednesday, September the 26th, 9-10am PDT.

What are you waiting for? Register here!

About the presenters

Sasha and Nicola work at AID:Tech, developing blockchain solutions leveraging a microservice architecture and Hyperledger Fabric and Composer frameworks to provide digital identities to transparently trace charitable donations and remittances as digital assets are exchanged.

Don’t miss Open FinTech Forum, October 10 and 11 in New York.

Join Open FinTech Forum: AI, Blockchain & Kubernetes on Wall Street next month to learn:

  • How to build internal open source programs
  • How to leverage cutting-edge open source technologies to drive efficiencies and flexibility

Blockchain Track:

Hear about the latest distributed ledger deployments, use cases, trends, and predictions of blockchain adoption. Session highlights include:

  • Panel Discussion: Distributed Ledger Technology Deployments & Use Cases in Financial Services – Jesse Chenard, MonetaGo; Umar Farooq, JP Morgan; Julio Faura, Santander Bank; Hanna Zubko, IntellectEU; Robert Hackett, Fortune Magazine
  • Enterprise Blockchain Adoption – Trends and Predictions – Saurabh Gupta, HfS Research
  • Blockchain Based Compliance Management System – Ashish Jadhav, Reliance Jio Infocomm Limited

Artificial Intelligence Track:

See how financial institutions are increasingly using AI and machine learning in a range of applications across the financial system including fraud detection, DDoS mitigation, marketing and usage pattern analysis. Session highlights include:  

  • Build Intelligent Applications with Azure Cognitive Service and CNTK – Bhakthi Liyanage, Bank of America
  • Will HAL Open the Pod Bay Doors? An (Enterprise FI) Decisioning Platform Leveraging Machine Learning – Sumit Daryani & Niraj Tank, Capital One
  • Using Text Mining and Machine Learning to Enhance the Credit Risk Assessment Process – Bruce Brenkus, Spotcap

Cloud Native & Kubernetes Track:

Learn how Kubernetes and other cloud native applications help provide integration and automation between development and deployment for platform or infrastructure as code. Session highlights include:

  • Panel Discussion: Real-World Kubernetes Use Cases in Financial Services: Lessons Learned from Capital One, BlackRock and Bloomberg – Steven Bower, Bloomberg; Michael Francis, BlackRock; Jeffrey Odom, Capital One; Paris Pittman, Google; Ron Miller, TechCrunch
  • Multi-tenancy and Tenant Isolation on Kubernetes – Michael Knapp & Andrew Gao, Capital One
  • Building a Banking Platform on Open Source & Containers to Achieve a Cloud Native Platform – Jason Poley, Barclays

Open FinTech Forum also offers deep dive sessions on building internal open source programs (governance, compliance, establishing an open source program office, contributing and more) as well as tutorials on blockchain, containers and cloud native.

Whether you are already using open source, or just getting started, Open FinTech Forum offers learnings, insights and connections that can help inform IT decision makers about the open technologies driving digital transformation and how to best utilize them.

Sign up to receive updates on Open FinTech Forum: 

VIEW THE FULL SCHEDULE »

Secure your spot now.

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The Real-Time Linux project team continues to prepare the remaining patches for inclusion into the mainline kernel.

Long ago in 2009, a small team of kernel developers had finished consolidating previous  prototypic developments to make Linux real-time capable into a single out-of-tree patch set, called the PREEMPT_RT patch set. This patch set can be applied to turn a vanilla mainline Linux kernel without real-time capabilities into a real-time capable Linux kernel. Many companies use this patch set to build various industrial systems that required to implement hard real-time properties at comparatively relaxed time bounds of about one millisecond precision.

BMW Car IT also used this patch set to build real-time capable prototypes for complex functions in the area of autonomous driving. However, from the beginning with the development of those prototypes, it was clear that any product with high-quality demands requires to get the PREEMPT_RT patch set in the main-line development for increased compatibility of features, stronger quality assurance and reduced maintenance. Hence, BMW Car IT started driving efforts to make Linux real-time capable in 2014.

First, BMW Car IT joined OSADL, the Open Source Automation Development Lab, as a Gold member to support real-time Linux development activities, which was collaboratively funded by the OSADL member at that time.

Second, our former colleague Daniel Wagner started to get acquainted with the existing PREEMPT_RT patch in 2014 and made a number of contributions to the Linux kernel related to real-time capabilities from 2015 until end of 2016. Due to his experience with the PREEMPT_RT patch, he is now the maintainer of the Linux 4.4 real-time stable branch, and one of the three maintainers for the real-time stable patch branches.

Since 2016, the Real-time Linux project has been a collaborative project under the umbrella of the Linux Foundation. The project’s goal is to make the mainline Linux real-time capable. The project ensures that the Linux kernel developers have the ability to continue development work, long-term support and future research for a real-time-capable Linux.

Rewriting and Refactoring

In the last two years, 2016 and 2017, the Real-time Linux development team rewrote the CPU hotplug infrastructure and refactored the timer wheel and high-resolution timers. This already reduced the out-of-tree PREEMPT_RT patch set significantly.

Due to a funding decrease that became apparent at the beginning of 2018, the development in the Real-time Linux project would have reduced its workforce. Fortunately, Intel and BMW Car IT could close this funding gap. Intel increased their membership from Gold to Platinum and BMW Car IT joined Linux Foundation and the collaborative project as Gold member in the Real-time Linux Project. So now after those project adjustments, the Real-time Linux Project team is back on track and continues to prepare the remaining patches for inclusion into the mainline development with full speed.

In 2018, the Real-time Linux kernel team will be refactoring, rewriting and generally improving the printk and soft interrupt infrastructure and other smaller other parts. This work will prepare the Linux kernel source code so that all further real-time specific changes can smoothly be merged into the mainline kernel.

The real-time functionality touches the core kernel parts (i.e., it requires significant changes in timers, schedulers, locking mechanisms, interrupt handling and more), and it also is a cross-cutting concern for all drivers (i.e., every driver has to follow a certain discipline to make the overall kernel real-time capable). Hence, it is difficult to predict the exact date when the Real-time Linux Project will finally have all its patches merged into the main-line development. However, there is no doubt that the Linux kernel will eventually become real-time capable.

“The Linux kernel is a software development project of huge invest to us. Obviously, BMW Car IT has a high interest of making best possible use of this software asset. The automotive industry has particular requirements, such as higher real-time requirements and the need for longer maintenance periods, than the general IT and consumer electronics industry. With our investments in initiatives addressing these requirements, we can ensure that Linux fits to our needs,” says Kai-Uwe Balszuweit, CEO of BMW Car IT.

Reviewing and Testing

Once the real-time capabilities have been integrated in the main-line development, the project work is of course not just finished and the Real-time Linux project cannot just be abandoned. After the final integration into the main-line development, the development activities will slowly shift its focus:

The core system will not require further changes for the real-time capability, but the Real-Time Linux development team will need to review, test and adjust new incoming features from other kernel development teams to keep the kernel real-time capable when these new features are included.

Furthermore, the already existing real-time stable trees must be further continued to be maintained until the end of life of the corresponding kernel LTS version, so commonly two years for most LTS versions, but possibly even longer. Slowly over the years, the real-time stable trees for older kernel versions will reach their end of life, while for younger LTS kernel versions, which have the real-time capabilities fully included, have no need to maintain a separate real-time stable branch. This will decrease the working effort on the current real-time stable maintainers and they can focus their work to assist in the quality assurance of the continuous main-line development.

Of course, all users and stakeholders of the real-time capability must continue to support all these activities over the next years.

This is well understood at BMW Car IT, and we expect that other companies that require the real-time capability in Linux will also follow and express this general common understanding. Beyond software development until start of production, operations and maintenance is an important software development activity that is not underestimated at BMW Car IT.

Christian Salzmann, the CEO of BMW Car IT, states it clearly: “Providing good software solutions to BMW for many years, BMW Car IT knows that continuous operations and maintenance is one of the major cornerstones for providing a great experience to our customers. The continuous activity of development and operations of software going hand-in-hand, in short DevOps, is part of BMW Car IT’s company mindset. BMW Car IT’s support for further development and operations in the Real-time Linux Project is no exception to this rule.”

The Linux Foundation’s Jim Zemlin welcomes attendees to Open Source Summit in Vancouver.

The Linux Foundation’s job is to create engines of innovation and enable the gears of those engines to spin faster, said Executive Director Jim Zemlin, in opening remarks at Open Source Summit in Vancouver.

Examples of how the organization is driving innovation across industries can be seen in projects such as Let’s Encrypt, a free, automated certificate authority working to encrypt the entire web, Automotive Grade Linux, Hyperledger, and the new Academy Software Foundation, which is focused on open collaboration within the motion picture industry.

This is open source beyond Linux and, according to Zemlin, is indicative of one of the best years and most robust periods at The Linux Foundation itself. So far in 2018, the organization has added a new member every single day, with Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), one of The Linux Foundation’s fastest growing projects, announcing 38 new members this week.

Successful projects depend on members, developers, standards, and infrastructure to develop products that the market will adopt, said Zemlin, and The Linux Foundation facilitates this success in many ways. It works downstream helping industry, government, and academia understand how to consume and contribute to open source. At the same time, it works upstream to foster development and adoption of open source solutions, showing industries how to create value and generate reinvestment.

During his keynote, Zemlin spoke with Sarah Novotny, Open Source Strategy Lead at Google Cloud, about Google’s support of open source development. In the talk, Novotny announced that Google Cloud is transferring ownership and management of the Kubernetes project’s cloud resources to CNCF community contributors and is additionally granting $9 million over three years to CNCF to cover infrastructure costs associated with Kubernetes development and distribution. Novotny, who noted that the project is actively seeking new contributors, said this commitment will provide the opportunity for more people to get involved.

In the words of Zemlin, let’s go solve big problems, one person, one project, one industry at a time.

Join 500+ CIOs, senior technologists, and IT decision makers at Open FinTech Forum, October 10-11 in New York.

The Schedule is Now Live for Open FinTech Forum!

Join 500+ CIOs, senior technologists, and IT decision makers at Open FinTech Forum to learn the best strategies for building internal open source programs and how to leverage cutting-edge open source technologies for the financial services industry, including AI, Blockchain, Kubernetes, Cloud Native and more, to drive efficiencies and flexibility.

Featured Sessions Include:

  • Build Intelligent Applications with Azure Cognitive Service and CNTK – Bhakthi Liyanage, Bank of America
  • Smart Money Bets on Open Source Adoption in AI/ML Fintech Applications – Laila Paszti, GTC Law Group P.C.
  • Adapting Kubernetes for Machine Learning Workflows – Ania Musial & Keith Laban, Bloomberg
  • Real-World Kubernetes Use Cases in Financial Services: Lessons learned from Capital One, BlackRock and Bloomberg – Jeffrey Odom, Capital One; Michael Francis, BlackRock; Kevin Fleming, Bloomberg; Paris Pittman, Google; and Ron Miller, TechCrunch
  • Distributed Ledger Technology Deployments & Use Cases in Financial Services – Hanna Zubko, IntellectEU; Jesse Chenard, MonetaGo; Umar Farooq, JP Morgan; Julio Faura, Santander Bank; and Robert Hackett, Fortune
  • Enterprise Blockchain Adoption – Trends and Predictions – Saurabh Gupta, HfS Research
  • Why Two Sigma Contributes to Open Source – Julia Meinwald, Two Sigma
  • Three Cs to an Open Source Program Office – Justin Rackliffe, Fidelity Investments

Sign up to receive updates on Open FinTech Forum:
VIEW THE FULL SCHEDULE »

Secure your spot now.

REGISTER NOW »

Linux Foundation members and LF project members receive a 20% discount on registration pricing. FinTech CIOs and senior technologists may receive a 50% discount on registration fees.

Email events@linuxfoundation.org for discount codes.

Open source has transformed industry after industry – now it is time for the power and energy sectors. Be a part of this movement and join us in at our first LF Energy Summit.

Join us on October 24th for the first LF Energy Summit, Edinburgh, UK.

In mid-July, The Linux Foundation launched LF Energy with support from RTE, Europe’s biggest transmission power systems operator, the Electric Power Research Institute, the European Network of Transmission System Operators, and others, in a bid to speed technological innovation and accelerate the energy transition across the planet. System operators, and the utilities that bring electricity to our homes, businesses, and soon our vehicles are on the frontlines in the battle against climate change.

Open source has transformed industry after industry – now it is time for the power and energy sectors. Be a part of this movement and join us in at our first LF Energy Summit, co-located with Open Source Summit Edinburgh.

The digitalization of energy heralds the advent of a new age for electricity that will be organized around highly flexible and heterogeneous energy devices and sensors requiring advanced communication capacity between systems, people, and things. Up until now, power systems have been an asset-heavy industry (think coal-fired plants, transformers, and substations) with centralized control and one-way communication. The future grid is composed of distributed energy resources that can be aggregated and shaped to provide reliable electricity when variable resources like the sun and wind are orchestrated with battery storage to shape loads and shave peaks. The complexity of this cannot be managed with top-down control but will require highly sophisticated, automated, and self-aware digital intelligence spanning previously distinct sectors such as transportation, telecommunications, banking, and built environments.

Right now, while we are far from plug-and-play, the history of open source shows that shared digital “plumbing” holds the key to interoperability. For example, if you look at the scaling of the Internet, it is clear that operating systems like the Linux OS made hardware agnostic and enabled the abstraction of complexity. We need an analogous power systems operating system  for electricity if we are to meet global challenges, which is why we are gathering for the first LF Energy Summit as a part of the Open Source Summit Europe in Edinburgh.

The day will be divided into two parts. In the morning we will have the opportunity to hear from inspiring leaders in both the energy and open source fields, including:

  • Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation
  • Olivier Grabette, Deputy CEO, RTE
  • Shuli Goodman, Executive Director, LF Energy
  • Laurent Schmidt, Secretariat General, ENTSO-E

We will discuss the challenges and opportunities, as well as a high-level primer describing the grid of the future. In the second half of the day, we will “Get Energized” via facilitated and designed discussions in small and large groups leading us to a road map with actionable outcomes.There will be highly skilled facilitators and a visual recorder to sharpen our vision and plot next steps.

This is an evolving event – meaning we do not have it all figured out! We need your input. The event is designed for CDOs, CTOs, CIOs, power system engineers, grid architects, cloud architects, network architects, business analysts, market makers, and developers interested in transforming the future of energy. Everyone is welcome. Be prepared for the journey! We will travel far together.

Don’t miss out – register today for the LFE Summit or add it to your existing Open Source Summit registration for a discounted price of $200.00 USD.

Make sure to subscribe to the LF Energy Newsletter to follow the project.

See these NEW videos to learn more:

LF Energy: The future of energy is shared technology innovation.
Let’s Coordinate: An LF Energy open source workflow platform.