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Community growth and engagement, coupled with new member support, offers additional approaches for assessing safety in applications using Linux.

 

SAN FRANCISCO, June 18, 2020 – As ELISA (Enabling Linux in Safety Applications) nears its year and a half anniversary, the project continues to hit key milestones showing its value for delivering foundational support for safety-critical applications.   ELISA, formed in February 2019 and a hosted project of the Linux Foundation, aims to create a shared set of tools and processes to help companies build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications and systems whose failure could result in loss of human life, significant property damage, or environmental damage. 

As Linux continues to be a key component in safety applications, autonomous vehicles, medical devices, and even rockets, ELISA will make it easier for companies to build and expand these safety-critical systems. As a show of support for this business-critical initiative, several new members have joined the ELISA project. New members include Premier Member Intel/Mobileye, General Members ADIT, Elektrobit, Mentor, SiFive, Suzuki, Wind River and Associate Members Automotive Grade Linux and Technical University of Applied Sciences Regensburg. 

“Since forming ELISA, we’ve had incredible support from members and the community. As we near 18 months as a project, we’ve agreed on a strategy for partitioning the problem into manageable pieces, and have working groups making progress towards approaches to bridge between the linux and safety standards communities and are looking forward to continuing the path we’ve been on,” said Kate Stewart, Senior Director of Strategic Programs, The Linux Foundation. “We are encouraged by broad participation, as demonstrated by our nine new members, including Intel, as well as very active working groups. These kinds of activities are indicators of achieving the critical mass needed to establish a widely discussed and accepted methodology.”

“Intel and Mobileye see the Linux Operating system as an important player in the functional safety software ecosystem,” said Simone Fabris, ELISA Governing Board member and senior director of system safety at Mobileye, an Intel Company.  “The impact and skills of the open source community will be harnessed through the ELISA project to increase the safety integrity of future embedded systems while, at the same time, contributing to a better quality, reduction of development costs and speed up the delivery of complex functional safety systems across multiple industry domains including autonomous driving and avionics.”

“Linux has evolved ever since its inception to run on devices small and large while serving the needs of a wide spectrum of technology, from an elevator to a supercomputer,” said Shuah Khan, ELISA Technical Steering Committee Member and Linux Foundation Fellow. “Each of these evolutions requires identifying what is needed and what is missing in the existing code base and enhancing existing features and adding new ones. ELISA project’s mission is to evolve Linux to serve an emerging and important safety-critical space that spans medical devices, civil infrastructure, caregiving robots, automotives, and others.”

In addition to incredible member growth, ELISA has established several work groups to further the crucial work of the cross-industry project and its work toward advancing open source in safety-critical systems. These groups include Kernel Development Process,  Safety Architecture, Medical Devices and is now forming an Automotive working group.

Community members will have the chance to learn more about this important work during the Linux Foundation’s Open Source Summit North America where Kate Stewart, Senior Director of Strategic Programs, The Linux Foundation, is set to give a keynote speech, “Keynote: Open Source in Safety Critical Applications: The End Game.” For the first time, this event will also include an Open Source Dependability track. See the full schedule for Open Source Summit North America taking place virtually from June 29, 2020 to July 2, 2020.

In addition, ELISA will continue to hold regular workshops to discuss approaches to solving the missing pieces and better tooling. Listen to previous workshops and get notified of upcoming events at https://elisa.tech/news/.

New Member Quotes

ADIT, a joint venture of Robert Bosch GmbH and DENSO Corporation

“Having followed ELISA since May 2019 and having participated in all workshops so far, I am excited to see the recent increase of interest in the field of Automotive and Linux; the core competence of ADIT. The enthusiastic collaboration between functional safety participants combined with the recent excellent contributions from Linux experts are adding the value and momentum needed to enable Linux in safety applications and to make ELISA a success story”, said Philipp Ahmann, manager at ADIT, a joint venture of Robert Bosch GmbH and DENSO Corporation.

Automotive Grade Linux 

“Functional safety is an increasingly important topic for Automotive Grade Linux as we expand into Instrument Cluster and eventually into Autonomous Vehicle solutions”, said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at the Linux Foundation. “With the support of eleven car manufacturers and over 150 companies, we look forward to collaborating with ELISA Project and help drive the requirements from an automotive perspective.”

Elektrobit

“The research done in the ELISA project defines the future of enabling Linux for functional safety applications,” said Martin Schleicher, Executive Vice President Business Management, Elektrobit. “Vehicles are clearly products with special sensitivity.  EB is pleased to be part of this exciting project and looks forward to contributing its broad experience in automotive software and functional safety expertise to drive the development of mission critical automotive software.”

Mentor, a Siemens business

“The ELISA project enables Safety and Linux experts to work hand in hand on the future topics in using Linux in safety-related systems. Under the umbrella of the Linux Foundation the organizational frame allows constructive discussions about the main challenges for ‘making Linux safe,’” said Michael Ziganek, General Manager, Automotive Business Unit, Mentor, a Siemens business. “For us as Mentor, a Siemens business, being part of ELISA is an accelerator to have more customized technology offerings for our customers regarding our automotive software solutions, especially to integrate and maintain Linux in safety-critical systems.”

Technical University of Applied Sciences Regensburg

“After closely, but informally collaborating with the ELISA project via research, student and development projects, we are excited about joining ELISA as an associate member! Combining the industrial experience and insights of the world leaders in safety-critical Linux systems with the group’s research portfolio will bring marked benefits to both, industrial and academic communities, who are still too often at a distance from one another,” says Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Mauerer, head of the digitalization laboratory at OTH Regensburg.

Wind River

“Companies in all sectors will greatly benefit from the ELISA project’s goal of advancing open source to building and certifying Linux-based safety-critical applications and systems. When stakes are high and failure is not an option, it is vital for the ecosystem to work together to make safety a priority. Wind River has a long history in Linux and mission-critical systems and we look forward to contributing in order to help the ELISA project advance Linux for safety-critical applications,” said Gareth Noyes, senior vice president, Products, Wind River.

About ELISA

ELISA, Enabling Linux in Safety Applications, is an open source project hosted by the Linux Foundation. ELISA’s goal is to create a shared set of tools and processes to help companies build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications and systems whose failure could result in loss of human life, significant property damage or environmental damage. Building off the work being done by SIL2LinuxMP project and Real-Time Linux project, ELISA will make it easier for companies to build safety-critical systems such as robotic devices, medical devices, smart factories, transportation systems and autonomous driving using Linux. Founding members of ELISA include Arm, BMW Car IT GmbH, KUKA, Linutronix, and Toyota.

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and industry adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

# # #

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Arm, BMW Car IT GmbH, KUKA, Linutronix, and Toyota join ELISA project to advance open source functional safety across transportation, manufacturing, healthcare, and energy industries

SAN FRANCISCO, February 21, 2019 – The Linux Foundation today launched the Enabling Linux in Safety Applications (ELISA) open source project to create a shared set of tools and processes to help companies build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications and systems whose failure could result in loss of human life, significant property damage or environmental damage. Building off the work being done by SIL2LinuxMP project and Real-Time Linux project, ELISA will make it easier for companies to build safety-critical systems such as robotic devices, medical devices, smart factories, transportation systems and autonomous driving using Linux. Founding members of ELISA include Arm, BMW Car IT GmbH, KUKA, Linutronix, and Toyota.

To be trusted, safety-critical systems must meet functional safety objectives for the overall safety of the system, including how it responds to actions such as user errors, hardware failures, and environmental changes. Companies must demonstrate that their software meets strict demands for reliability, quality assurance, risk management, development process, and documentation. Because there is no clear method for certifying Linux, it can be difficult for a company to demonstrate that their Linux-based system meets these safety objectives.

“All major industries, including energy, medical and automotive, want to use Linux for safety-critical applications because it can enable them to bring products to market faster and reduce the risk of critical design errors. The challenge has been the lack of the clear documentation and tools needed to demonstrate that a Linux-based system meets the necessary safety requirements for certification,” said Kate Stewart, Senior Director of Strategic Programs at The Linux Foundation. “Past attempts at solving this have lacked the critical mass needed to establish a widely discussed and accepted methodology, but with the formation of ELISA, we will be able to leverage the infrastructure and support of the broader Linux Foundation community that is needed to make this initiative successful.”

ELISA will work with certification authorities and standardization bodies in multiple industries to establish how Linux can be used as a component in safety-critical systems. The project will also define and maintain a common set of elements, processes and tools that can be incorporated into Linux-based, safety-critical systems amenable to safety certification.

Additional project goals include:

  • Develop reference documentation and use cases.
  • Educate the open source community on safety engineering best practices and educate the safety community on open source concepts.
  • Enable continuous feedback with the open source community to improve processes, and to automate quality assessment and assurance.
  • Support members with incident and hazard monitoring of critical components relevant to their systems and establish best practices for member response teams.

For more information about ELISA, visit elisa.tech.

Industry Support for ELISA

“The safe and effective performance of safety-related software is essential as we increasingly rely on programmable devices in our homes, workplaces and communities at-large. UL looks forward to the launch of ELISA and the opportunity it presents to more rapidly assess and validate – with confidence – the Linux component of safety systems.”
– Tom Blewitt, VP & CTO, UL

“The Open Source Automation Development Lab (OSADL) was founded more than 13 years ago to advance the use of GNU/Linux in industrial products by addressing the need for real-time capabilities and safety certification. Shortly after, we here at OSADL created the OSADL Safety  Critical Linux Working Group for functional safety, which culminated in the SIL2LinuxMP project that laid some groundwork for using GNU/Linux in safety-related systems. We subsequently added legal support and many other services that are needed to successfully use Open Source software in industry to our portfolio. We still continue to foster real-time Linux, among other, as a Gold member of the Linux Foundation’s Real-Time Linux project, and we are proud to see some of the efforts of the SIL2LinuxMP project continued at a larger scale in the ELISA project.”
– Dr. Carsten Emde, General Manager, OSADL

“At Automotive Grade Linux, we are working closely with the Real-Time Linux project and the ELISA project in order to achieve functional safety certifications for automotive applications such as our instrument cluster, heads-up-display and ADAS solutions. By working closely with ELISA, this will help us provide automotive manufacturers with all of the testing artifacts and documentation they need to achieve safety certification for their AGL-based systems.” –
– Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at the Linux Foundation

“Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) Project is committed to improving implementation of Linux-based civil infrastructure systems through industrial grade software and a universal operating system that is maintained for more than ten years. We work closely with several open source project such as Real-Time Linux, Linux Kernel LTS and KernelCI to achieve Long Term Support (LTS) and safety and security certifications. We support the ELISA Project and its efforts to build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications on a broader scale.”
– Urs Gleim, Governing Board Chair of the Civil Infrastructure Platform, hosted at the Linux Foundation

ELISA Founding Members
Founding members of ELISA include Arm, BMW Car IT GmbH, KUKA, Linutronix, and Toyota.

Arm
“Safety and trust are the highest priorities for the automotive industry as vehicles become more autonomous and Arm’s Automotive Enhanced technologies are at the heart of systems powering these vehicles. The work the Linux Foundation is undertaking with the ELISA project complements Arm’s functional safety leadership and continued commitment to software enablement.”
– Lakshmi Mandyam, VP automotive, Automotive and IoT Line of Business, Arm

KUKA
“KUKA is looking forward to working with other Linux experts in order to define a series of methods and processes, with the goal of certifying Linux-based safety-critical systems.”
– David Fuller, CTO, KUKA AG

Linutronix
“We are happy to see that the SIL2Linux work will continue and advance with the launch of ELISA and provide a clear focus for the use of Linux in safety critical applications. ELISA will help to establish Linux in the industrial control world deeper than ever before.”
– Heinz Egger, CEO, Linutronix

Toyota
“Open source software has become a significant part of our technology strategy, and we want to help make it easier to use Linux-based applications. Toyota believes the ELISA project will support CASE use cases in an innovative way for the automotive industry.”
– Mr. Masato Hashimoto, General Manager of E/E Architecture Development Div., Advanced R&D and Engineering Company, Toyota

About The Linux Foundation
The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and industry adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

# # #

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Media Inquiries
Emily Olin
The Linux Foundation
eolin@linuxfoundation.org

The Xen Project is now one of the most popular open source hypervisors and amasses more than 10 million users, and this October marks our 15th anniversary.

In the 1990s, Xen was a part of a research project to build a public computing infrastructure on the Internet led by Ian Pratt and Keir Fraser at The University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory. The Xen Project is now one of the most popular open source hypervisors and amasses more than 10 million users, and this October marks our 15th anniversary.

From its beginnings, Xen technology focused on building a modular and flexible architecture, a high degree of customizability, and security. This security mindset from the outset led to inclusion of non-core security technologies, which eventually allowed the Xen Project to excel outside of the data center and be a trusted source for security and embedded vendors (ex. Qubes, Bromium, Bitdefender, Star Labs, Zentific, Dornerworks, Bosch, BAE systems), and also a leading hypervisor contender for the automotive space.

As the Xen Project looks to a future of virtualization everywhere, we reflect back on some of our major achievements over the last 15 years. To celebrate, we’ve created an infographic that captures some of our key milestones share it on social.

A few community members also weighed in on some of their favorite Xen Project moments and what’s to come:

“Xen offers best-in-class isolation and separation while preserving nearly bare-metal performance on x86 and ARM platforms. The growing market for a secure hypervisor ensures Xen will continue to grow in multiple markets to meet users demands.”

  • Doug Goldstein, Software Developer V, Hypervisors at Rackspace

“Xen started life at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory, as part of the XenoServers research project to build a public computing infrastructure on the Internet. It’s been fantastic to see the impact of Xen, and the role it’s played at the heart of what we now call Infrastructure as a Service Cloud Computing. It’s been an incredible journey from Xen’s early beginnings in the University, to making our first open source release in 2003, to building a strong community of contributors around the project, and then Xen’s growth beyond server virtualization into end-user systems and now embedded devices. Xen is a great example of the power of open source to enable cooperation and drive technological progress.”

  • Ian Pratt, Founder and President at Bromium, and Xen Project Founder

“From its beginnings as a research project, able to run just a handful of Linux VMs, through being the foundation of many of the world’s largest clouds, to being the open-source hypervisor of choice for many next-generation industrial, automotive and aeronautical applications, Xen Project has shown its adaptability, flexibility and pioneering spirit for 15 years. Today, at Citrix, Xen remains the core of our Citrix Hypervisor platform, powering the secure delivery of applications and data to organizations across the globe. Xen Project Hypervisor allows our customers to run thousands of virtual desktops per server, many of them using Xen’s ground-breaking GPU virtualization capabilities. Happy birthday, Xen!”

  • James Bulpin, Senior Director of Technology at Citrix

“The Xen open source community is a vibrant and diverse platform for collaboration, something which is important to Arm and vital to the ongoing success of our ecosystem. We’ve contributed to the Xen open source hypervisor across a range of markets starting with mobile, moving into the strategic enablement that allowed the deployment of Arm-based cloud servers, and more recently focusing on the embedded space, exploring computing in safety-sensitive environments such as connected vehicles.”

  • Mark Hambleton, Vice President of Open Source Software, Arm

“I – like many others – associate cloud computing with Xen. All my cloud-related projects are tied to companies running large deployments of Xen. These days even my weekend binge-watching needs are satisfied by a Xen instance somewhere. With Xen making its way into cars, rocket launch operations and satellites, it’s safe to say the industry at large recognizes it as a solid foundation for building the future, and I’m excited to be a part of it.”

  • Mihai Dontu, Chief Linux Officer at Bitdefender

“Xen was the first open source hypervisor for the data center, the very foundation of the cloud as we know it. Later, it pioneered virtualization for embedded and IoT, making its way into set-top boxes and smaller ARM devices. Now, we are discussing automotive, medical and industrial devices. It is incredibly exciting to be part of a ground-breaking project that has been at the forefront of open source innovation since its inception.”

  • Stefano Stabellini, Principal Engineer, Tech Lead at Xilinx and Xen on ARM Committer and Maintainer

“Congratulations to the Xen Project on this milestone anniversary. As the first open source data center hypervisor, Xen played a key role in defining what virtualization technology could deliver and has been the foundation for many advancements in the modern data center and cloud computing. Intel has been involved with Xen development since the early days and enjoys strong collaboration with the Xen community, which helped make Xen the first hypervisor to include Intel® Virtualization Technology (VT-x) support, providing a more secure, efficient platform for server workload consolidation and the growth of cloud computing.”

  • Susie Li, Director of Open Source Virtualization Engineering, Intel Corp.

“It is amazing how a project that started 15 years ago has not lost any of its original appeal, despite the constant evolution of hardware architectures and new applications that were unimaginable when the Xen Project started. In certain segments, e.g. power management, the pace of innovation in Xen is just accelerating and serves as the ultimate reference for all other virtualization efforts. Happy quinceañera (sweet 15) Xen!”

  • Vojin Zivojnovic, CEO and Co-Founder of Aggios

Building the Journey Towards the Next 15 Years; Sneak Peek into Xen Project 4.12

The next Xen Project release is set for March 2019. The release continues to support the Xen Project’s efforts around security with cloud environments and rich features and architectural changes for automotive and embedded use cases. Expect:

  • Deprivileged Device Model: Under tech preview in QEMU 3.0, the feature adds extra restrictions to a device model running in domain 0 in order to prevent a compromised device model to attack the rest of the system.  
  • Capability to compile a PV-only version of Xen giving cloud providers simplified management, reducing the surface of attack, and the ability to build a Xen Project hypervisor configuration with no “classic” PV support at all.
  • Xen to boot multiple domains in parallel on Arm, in addition to dom0 enabling booting of domains in less than 1 second. This is the first step towards a dom0-less Xen, which impacts statically configured embedded systems that require very fast boot times.  
  • Reduction of codesize to 46 KSLOC for safety certification and the first phase of making the codebase MISRA C compliant.
    • MISRA C is a set of software development guidelines for the C programming language developed by the Motor Industry Software Reliability Association with the aim to facilitate code safety, security, portability, and reliability in the context of embedded systems.

Thank you for the last 15 years and for the next 15+ to come!

Lars Kurth, Chairperson of the Xen Project

Share your expertise! Submit your proposal to speak at ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe by July 1.

For the past 13 years, Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) has been the premier vendor-neutral technical conference for companies and developers using Linux in embedded products. ELC has become the preeminent space for product vendors as well as kernel and systems developers to collaborate with user-space developers – the people building applications on embedded Linux.

OpenIoT Summit joins the technical experts paving the way for the new industrial transformation, industry 4.0, along with those looking to develop the skills needed to succeed, for education, collaboration, and deep dive learning opportunities. Share your expertise and present the information needed to lead successful IoT developments, progress the development of IoT solutions, use Linux in IoT, devices, and Automotive, and more.

View Full List of Suggested Topics and Submit Now >>

Get Inspired!

Watch presentations from  ELC Europe 2017

View All ELC Europe 2017 Keynotes »

Join us at Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit Europe in Edinburgh, UK on October 22-24, 2018. Sign up to receive conference updates.

ACRN is a flexible, lightweight reference hypervisor, built with real-time and safety-criticality in mind.

This article was produced by The Linux Foundation with contributions from Eddie Dong, Principle Engineer of Intel Open Source Center.

As the Internet of Things has grown in scale, IoT developers are increasingly expected to support a range of hardware resources, operating systems, and software tools/applications. This is a challenge given many connected devices are size-constrained. Virtualization can help meet these broad needs, but existing options don’t offer the right mix of size, flexibility, and functionality for IoT development.
ACRN

ACRN is different by design. Launched at Embedded Linux Conference 2018, ACRN is a flexible, lightweight reference hypervisor, built with real-time and safety-criticality in mind and optimized to streamline embedded development through an open source platform.

One of ACRN’s biggest advantages is its small size — roughly only 25K lines of code at launch.

“The idea for ACRN came from our work enabling virtualization technology for customers,” said Imad Sousou, Corporate Vice President and General Manager of the Open Source Technology Center at Intel, which seeded the source code to launch the project. “There’s strong workload consolidation in embedded IoT development. Using hypervisor technology, workloads with mixed-criticality can be consolidated on a single platform, lowering development and deployment costs and allowing for a more streamlined system architecture.”

And about the name: ACRN is not an acronym. Pronounced “acorn,” the name symbolizes something that starts small and grows into something big, similar to how the project hopes to grow through community participation.

There’re two key components of ACRN: the hypervisor itself and the ACRN device model. The ACRN Hypervisor is a Type 1 reference hypervisor stack, running directly on bare-metal. The ACRN Device Model is a reference framework implementation for virtual device emulation that provides rich I/O virtualization support currently planned for audio, video, graphics, and USB. More mediator features are expected as the community grows.

How it works

ACRN features a Linux-based Service operating system (OS) running on the hypervisor and can simultaneously run multiple guest operating systems for workload consolidation. The ACRN hypervisor creates the first virtual environment for the Service OS and then launches Guest OSes. The Service OS runs the native device drivers to manage the hardware and provides I/O mediation to the Guest OS.ACRN

The Service OS runs with the system’s highest virtual machine priority to meet time-sensitive requirements and system quality of service (QoS). The Service OS runs Clear Linux* today, but ACRN can support other Linux* distros or proprietary RTOS as either the Service OS or Guest OS. The community is invited to help enable other Service OS options, and use the reference stack to enable Guest OSes such as other Linux* distributions, Android*, Windows* or proprietary RTOSes.

To keep the ACRN hypervisor code base as small and efficient as possible, the bulk of device model implementation resides in the Service OS to provide sharing and other capabilities. The result is a small footprint, low-latency code base optimized for resource constrained devices, built with virtualization functions specific to IoT development, such as graphics, media, audio, imaging, and other I/O mediators that require sharing of resources. In this way ACRN fills the gap between large datacenter hypervisors and hard partitioning hypervisors, and is ideal for a wide variety of IoT development.

One example is the Software Defined Cockpit (SDC) in vehicles. Using ACRN as the reference implementation, vendors can build solutions including the instrument cluster, in-vehicle infotainment (IVI) system, and one or more rear-seat entertainment (RSE) systems. The IVI and RSE systems can run as an isolated Virtual Machine (VM) for overall system safety considerations.

Software Defined Industrial Systems (SDIS) are further examples, including cyber-physical systems, IoT, cloud computing and cognitive computing. ACRN can help SDIS consolidate industrial workloads and can be orchestrated flexibly across systems. This helps provide substantial benefits to customers including lower costs, simplified security, increased reliability, and easier system management, among others.

Early endorsement of ACRN includes Intel, ADLINK Technology, Aptiv, LG Electronics, and Neusoft. Community members are invited to download the code and participate at the ACRN GitHub site. More detailed use case information and participation information can be found on the ACRN website.

Join us at Open Source Summit + Embedded Linux Conference Europe in Edinburgh, UK on October 22-24, 2018, for 100+ sessions on Linux, Cloud, Containers, AI, Community, and more.

Also, check out the ACRN Hypervisor Meetup in Shanghai – Q2 2018 (Minhang, China):

2018年3月Linux Foundation 发布了 ACRN hypervisor项目。随后陆续收到了很多来自社区和行业伙伴的反馈。这次的Meetup希望给大家一次面对面交流的机会。英特尔公司作为ACRN项目的发起者之一 将会介绍一下项目的体系架构,ACRN 未来的roadmap (draft)讨论,也将演示一些应用场景。各行业伙伴也将会分享各自的关心的话题。ACRN作为一个Linux Foundation的开源项目热情欢迎大家的参与与反馈。

 

Open Source Summit livestream

The Linux Foundation is pleased to offer free live video streaming of all keynote sessions at Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference Europe, Oct. 23 to Oct. 25, 2017.

Join 2000 technologists and community members next week as they convene at Open Source Summit Europe and Embedded Linux Conference Europe in Prague. If you can’t be there in person, you can still take part, as The Linux Foundation is pleased to offer free live video streaming of all keynote sessions on Monday, Oct. 23 through Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017.  So, you can watch the event keynotes presented by Google, Intel, and VMware, among others.

The livestream will begin on Monday, Oct. 23 at 9 a.m. CEST (Central European Summer Time). Sign up now! You can also follow our live event updates on Twitter with #OSSummit.

All keynotes will be broadcasted live, including talks by Keila Banks, 15-year-old Programmer, Web Designer, and Technologist with her father Philip Banks; Mitchell Hashimoto, Founder, HashiCorp Founder of HashiCorp and Creator of Vagrant, Packer, Serf, Consul, Terraform, Vault and Nomad; Jan Kizska, Senior Key Expert, Siemens AG; Dirk Hohndel, VP & Chief Open Source Officer, VMware in a Conversation with Linux and Git Creator Linus Torvalds; Michael Dolan, Vice President of Strategic Programs & The Linux Foundation; and Jono Bacon, Community/Developer Strategy Consultant and Author.

Other featured conference keynotes include:

  • Neha Narkhede — Co-Founder & CTO of Confluent will discuss Apache Kafka and the Rise of the Streaming Platform
  • Reuben Paul — 11-year-old Hacker, CyberShaolin Founder and cybersecurity ambassador will talk about how Hacking is Child’s Play
  • Arpit Joshipura — General Manager, Networking, The Linux Foundation who will discuss Open Source Networking and a Vision of Fully Automated Networks
  • Imad Sousou — Vice President and General Manager, Software & Services Group, Intel
  • Sarah Novotny — Head of Open Source Strategy for GCP, Google
  • And more

View the full schedule of keynotes.

And sign up now for the free live video stream.

Once you sign up to watch the event keynotes, you’ll be able to view the livestream on the same page. If you sign up prior to the livestream day/time, simply return to this page and you’ll be able to view.

This week was a busy one for open source enterprise wins! Read the latest installment of our weekly digest to stay on the cutting edge of OSS business beats.

1) The Linux Foundation’s Dronecode project receives accolades for the creator of its PX4 project; Lorenz Meier has been recognized by MIT Technology Review in its annual list of Innovators Under 35.

Dronecode’s Meier Named to MIT Technology Review’s Prestigious List– Unmanned Aerial Online

2) “New round places company’s raised cash at more than $250m as the container application market value soars to $2.7bn.”

From Startup To An Open Source Giant. Docker Valuation Hits $1.3B Amid Fresh Funding Round– Data Economy

3) “One of the keys to Ubuntu’s success has been heavy optimization of the standard Linux kernel for cloud computing environments.”

Cloud-Optimized Linux: Inside Ubuntu’s Edge in AWS Cloud Computing– Silicon Angle

4) Microsoft announced purchase of a startup called Cycle Computing for an “undisclosed sum”. While it doesn’t have the name recognition of some of its peers, the startup has played a pivotal role in cloud computing today.

Microsoft Just Made a Brilliant Acquisition in Cloud Wars Against Amazon, Google– Business Insider

5) Open source content management system was initially released without frills or fanfare. After 2,600 commits, the 1.0 version is ready to tackle the blogging giants.

Ghost, the Open Source Blogging System, is Ready For Prime Time– TechCrunch

This week in OSS & Linux news, Jack Wallen shares a rundown of Google Fuchsia features and how they affect Android, Microsoft can no longer ignore Linux in the data center, & more! Read on to stay open-source-informed!

1) Jack Wallen shares pros and cons of Google Fuchsia

What Fuchsia Could Mean For Android– TechRepublic

2) “Microsoft is bridging the gap with Linux by baking it into its own products.”

How Microsoft is Becoming a Linux Vendor– CIO

3) Sprint’s CP30 “is designed to streamline mobile core architecture by collapsing multiple components into as few network nodes as possible.”

Sprint Debuts Open Source NFV/SDN Platform Developed with Intel Labs– Wireless Week

4) Move over, Siri! Open source Mycroft is here to assist us.

This Open-Source AI Voice Assistant Is Challenging Siri and Alexa for Market Superiority– Forbes

5) Heterogenous memory management is being added to the Linux kernel. Here’s what that will mean for machine learning hardware:

Faster Machine Learning is Coming to the Linux Kernel– InfoWorld

This week in open source news, Automotive Grade Linux is evidence of the auto industry merging with tech entirely, Hitachi steps up its open source game, and more! Read on to catch up on this busy week in OSS tech news. 

1) “Whether the car companies like it or not their industry is becoming a tech industry” writes Rob Enderle in a summary of a recent meeting with Dan Cauchy of Automotive Grade Linux.

Why Car Companies Need to Become Tech Companies– CIO

2) Hitachi increases its Linux Foundation participation. The company is also a member of many of the foundation’s projects including Automotive Grade Linux, Civil Infrastructure Platform, Cloud Foundry Foundation, Core Infrastructure Initiative, Hyperledger, and OpenDaylight.

Hitachi Steps Up Open Source Game With Linux Foundation– Data Economy

3) “Microsoft Azure customers looking for another Linux operating system (OS) option for their cloud workloads have another alternative to weigh this week.”

Intel’s Cloud-Friendly Clear Linux Hits Microsoft Azure– eWeek

4) Arpit Joshipura, new new general manager for networking and orchestration at The Linux Foundation, discusses where OSS networking needs to be taken.

Q&A with Arpit Joshipura, Head of Networking for The Linux Foundation– SDxCentral

Linux creator Linus Torvalds will speak at Embedded Linux Conference and OpenIoT Summit again this year, along with renowned robotics expert Guy Hoffman and Intel VP Imad Sousou, The Linux Foundation announced today. These headliners will join session speakers from embedded and IoT industry leaders, including AppDynamics, Free Electrons, IBM, Intel, Micosa, Midokura, The PTR Group, and many others. View the full schedule now.

The co-located conferences, to be held Feb. 21-23 in Portland, Oregon, bring together embedded and application developers, product vendors, kernel and systems developers as well systems architects and firmware developers to learn, share, and advance the technical work required for embedded Linux and the Internet of Things (IoT).

Now in its 12th year, Embedded Linux Conference is the premier vendor-neutral technical conference for companies and developers using Linux in embedded products. While OpenIoT Summit is the first and only IoT event focused on the development of IoT solutions.

Keynote speakers at ELC and OpenIOT 2017 include Guy Hoffman, Cornell professor of mechanical engineering and IDC Media Innovation Lab co-director; Imad Sousou, vice president of the software and services group at Intel Corporation; and Linus Torvalds. Additional keynote speakers will be announced in the coming weeks.

Last year was the first time in the history of ELC that Torvalds, a Linux Foundation fellow, spoke at the event. He was joined on stage by Dirk Hohndel, chief open source officer at VMware, who will conduct a similar on-stage interview again this year. The conversation ranged from IoT, to smart devices, security concerns, and more. You can see a video and summary of the conversation here.

Embedded Linux Conference session highlights include:

  • Making an Amazon Echo Compatible Linux System, Mike Anderson, The PTR Group

  • Transforming New Product Development with Open Hardware, Stephano Cetola, Intel

  • Linux You Can Drive My Car, Walt Miner, The Linux Foundation

  • Embedded Linux Size Reduction Techniques, Michael Opdenacker, Free Electrons

OpenIoT Summit session highlights include:

  • Voice-controlled home automation from scratch using IBM Watson, Docker, IFTTT, and serverless, Kalonji Bankole, IBM

  • Are Device Response Times a Neglected Risk of IoT?, Balwinder Kaur, AppDynamics

  • Enabling the management of constrained devices using the OIC framework, James Pace, Micosa

  • Journey to an Intelligent Industrial IOT Network, Susan Wu, Midokura

Check out the full schedule and register today to save $300. The early bird deadline ends on January 15. One registration provides access to all 130+ sessions and activities at both events. Linux.com readers can register now with the discount code, LINUXRD5, for 5% off the registration price. Register Now!