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Autodesk is undergoing a company-wide shift to open source and inner source. And that’s on top of the culture change that both development methods require.

Autodesk is undergoing a company-wide shift to open source and inner source. And that’s on top of the culture change that both development methods require.

Inner source means applying open source development practices and methodologies to internal projects, even if the projects are proprietary. And the culture change required to be successful can be a hard shift from a traditional corporate hierarchy to an open approach. Even though they’re connected, all three changes are distinct heavy lifts.

They began by hiring Guy Martin as Director of Open Source Strategy in the Engineering Practice at Autodesk, which was designed to transform engineering across the company. Naturally, open source would play a huge role in that effort, including spurring the use of inner source. But neither would flourish if the company culture didn’t change. And so the job title swiftly evolved to Director of Open @ADSK at the company.

“I tend to focus a lot more on the culture change and the inner source part of my role even though I’m working through a huge compliance initiative right now on the open source side,” Martin said.

The history of Autodesk’s open source transformation began shortly after the shift of all its products to cloud began, including its AutoCAD architecture software, building information modeling with its Revit products, as well as  its media and entertainment products. The company’s role in open source in entertainment is now so significant that Martin often speaks at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences on open source. They want to hear about what  Autodesk is doing as part of a larger collection of initiatives that the Academy is working on, Martin said.

At Autodesk, the goal is to spring engineers loose from their business silos and create a fully open source, cloud-centric company.

“Your primary identity detaches from being part of the AutoCAD team or part of the Revit team, or the 3ds Max or Inventor team or any of these products,” Martin explained. “It’s now shaping you into part of the Autodesk engineering team, and not your individual silo as a product organization in the company.”

Talent acquisition is among the top business goals for Open@Autodesk, especially given the company’s intense focus on innovation as well as making all of its products work seamlessly together. It takes talent skilled in open source methodologies and thinking to help make that happen. But it also means setting up the team dynamics so collaboration is more natural and less forced.

“With company cultures and some engineering cultures, the freedom to take an unconventional route to solve a problem doesn’t exist,” Martin said. “A lot of my job is to create that freedom so that smart and motivated engineers can figure out a way to put things together in a way that maybe they wouldn’t have thought of without that freedom and that culture.”

To help create an open source culture, the right tools must be in place and, oddly enough, those tools sometimes aren’t open source. For example, Martin created a single instance of Slack rather than use IRC, because Slack was more comfortable for users in other lines of the business who were already using it. The intent was to get teams to start talking across their organizational boundaries.

Another tool Martin is working with is Bitergia Analytics to monitor and manage Autodesk’s use of GitHub Enterprise.

Martin says the three key lessons he’s learned as an open source program manager are:

  1. Stay flexible because change happens
  2. Be humble but bold
  3. Be passionate.

“I’ve been at Autodesk two years but I’m still bootstrapping some of the things around culture. We have strong contributors in some projects, while in some projects we’re consuming. I think you have to do both, especially if you’re bootstrapping a new open source effort in a company. ”

“The challenge is always balancing the needs of the product teams, who have to get a product out the door, and who (and as an engineer I can say this) will take shortcuts whenever possible. They want to know, ‘why should we be doing this for the community? All we care about is our stuff.’ And it’s getting them past that. Yes, we’re doing work that’s going to be used elsewhere, but in the end we’re going to get benefits from pulling work from other people who have done work that they knew was going to be used in the community.”

An important step in using open source code effectively is setting explicit guidelines to be followed.

Open source programs at organizations of all sizes are fueling innovation, and many program leaders are quickly learning that weaving open source code into projects — and creating new projects — require informed guidelines and best practices. Organizations are often leveraging existing open source code to build their own commercial products and services, and contributing back to projects.

However, diving in and using open source code without an understanding of everything from legal risks to best development practices is perilous. Approaching open source code usage without best practices in place can also tarnish an organization’s reputation. That’s where the free, new Using Open Source Code guide comes in. It can help you craft and codify a comprehensive strategy.

One of the most important steps in using open source code effectively within your program is to set explicit guidelines to be followed, which are often summarized in a strategy document. What if code comes into one of your projects from a project with a different licensing setup? What acceptance, rejection, and exception policies should developers follow? What is your organization’s overall stance toward open source development?

These are all among the questions that need concrete answers as you codify your strategy, and there are more questions involving the ecosystem that applies to using open source code. How are APIs documented? Have you laid out a Contributor Licensing Agreement that everyone can use? Have you picked the right license for your project? Your strategy document should be specific about best practices, APIs and more.

“A well-designed open source compliance process should simultaneously ensure compliance with the terms of open source licenses and also help companies protect their own intellectual property and that of third-party suppliers from unintended disclosure and/or other consequences,” notes Ibrahim Haddad, Vice President of R&D and Head of the Open Source Group at Samsung Research America.

Creating a Policy

As the guide notes, creating a strategy document featuring best practices does not need to be complicated. A good open source usage policy includes six simple rules:

  • Engineers must receive approval from the OSRB before integrating any open source code in a product.
  • Software received from third parties must be audited to identify any open source code included, which ensures license obligations can be fulfilled before a product ships.
  • All software must be audited and reviewed, including all proprietary software components.
  • Products must fulfill open source licensing obligations prior to customer receipt.
  • Approval for using a given open source component in one product is not approval for another deployment, even if the open source component is the same.
  • All changed components must go through the approval process.

Importantly, the guide also notes the importance of effective code review practices. “If your code review process is overly burdensome, you’ll slow innovation or provide a good excuse for developers to circumvent the process completely,” Haddad emphasizes.

Additionally, Haddad, advises that circumspect code usage and compliance practices must be ongoing. “It’s important to remember that open source compliance doesn’t stop with version 1.0,” he said.

The Using Open Source Code guide can help you with everything from licensing issues to best development practices, and it explores how to seamlessly and safely weave open components into your open source projects. It is one of a new collection of free guides from The Linux Foundation and The TODO Group that are all extremely valuable for any organization running an open source program. The guides are available now to help you run an open source program office where open source is supported, shared, and leveraged. With such an office, organizations can establish and execute on their open source strategies efficiently, with clear terms.

These guides were produced based on expertise from open source leaders. Check out the guides and stay tuned for our continuing coverage.

Also, don’t miss the previous articles in the series:

How to Create an Open Source Program

Tools for Managing Open Source Programs

Measuring Your Open Source Program’s Success

Effective Strategies for Recruiting Open Source Developers

A Free Guide to Participating in Open Source Communities

open source program

“We believe that our projects help move the industry forward while giving other companies and individuals the opportunity to use our platform to scale more quickly and build better products.” – Christine Abernathy, Open Source Developer Advocate at Facebook.

Facebook’s open source team was “formally” created in 2009, but the company has built with open source from its inception. Facebook.com was originally built on top of the LAMP (Linux/ Apache/ MySQL/ PHP) stack. And over time Facebook has used and contributed back to these projects, as well as evolved and released new projects such as Hack which has its roots in PHP.

“Open source is core to our engineering DNA. We believe that sharing our code and even hardware designs accelerates the pace of innovation in the world. We believe that our projects help move the industry forward while giving other companies and individuals the opportunity to use our platform to scale more quickly and build better products.” – Christine Abernathy, Open Source Developer Advocate at Facebook.

Custom tools to manage open source

Facebook has a dedicated Tools team within the open source program office that is responsible for building internal tools to help manage its open source portfolio. This includes the projects that Facebook shares, which are mostly hosted on GitHub, as well as the other external projects they contribute to such as the Linux Kernel.

The program office provides a dashboard for each project that includes GitHub metrics such as the number of open issues or the ratio of internal to external contributions for a given time period. Project maintainers are given tools so they can bring GitHub pull requests and issues into their internal review and bug tracking systems. This makes it easier for engineers to manage external issues where they’re most comfortable. Maintainers also have access to workflow tools to reliably push internal commits out to GitHub, making it easy to quickly sync internal and external code bases and reducing the churn on landing external contributions.

The open source team can look at these project dashboards to help analyze the health of a particular project. They’ve even open-sourced some of these workflow tools: mention-bot and FBShipIt.

The team collects top-level statistics on how the overall portfolio is doing through aggregate dashboards across the GitHub orgs they manage. These are used to provide high-level reports to stakeholders and a community of internal open source enthusiasts. The tools team also provides insight into top contributors. Project maintainers are encouraged to refer to this list and reward their top contributors. The company periodically thanks its top internal contributors and makes some of this information available to its internal review systems.

The open source office also provides tooling to guide potential projects through the review process. This helps streamline the process and helps the team easily spot and correct bottlenecks.

The open source team also provides services such as documentation. This includes helping out with the technical content as well as building out some of the documentation infrastructure and templates that projects can use.

Open Source Success Through Steady Progress

At the end of each half the program office identifies goals around metrics they want to achieve. The metrics they track include:

  • The average age of open issues or open pull requests
  • The ratio of external to internal commits
  • The number of commits
  • The growth in followers and forks
  • The number of social media followers.

They’re periodically tweaking what they measure as they refine what it means to maintain a healthy portfolio.

Facebook also surveys new hires every six months to gauge their awareness of its open source program. They set baseline metrics a few surveys back and the goal is to maintain or grow those numbers.

Their open source success isn’t the result of one action but the cumulative effect of a steady stream of quality releases over the years and a focus on growing thriving communities to support those projects.

“Projects like React, React Native, Create-React-App, Immutable, HHVM, Fresco, and GraphQL are the constant beat that have contributed to the success of our program,” Abernathy said.

One of Facebook’s most successful projects is React Native. It makes use of many of Facebook’s tools to help manage the community. For example, mention-bot came out of this project and was a way to quickly identify reviewers for a pull request. FBShipIt helped it cut down the time to bring in external contributions, review them internally, and land these contributions back out to GitHub. In the early days, this process sometimes took a day as much of it is manual. Now this can be done in as little as minutes if it’s an automatic reviews.

The open source program office also provided documentation services to help refresh and keep the React Native site up to date.

Tips for New Open Source Program Managers

Organizations that are just establishing an open source strategy and program office can learn from the success of Facebook’s open source program. Here are the three key practices that Abernathy shared that have contributed to their success as a program office:

  1. When evaluating what to share, it should be something that’s useful to your company. Many of the projects that Facebook shares are used in production and include all the benefits that come along with that. This means those projects are likely to have continued support which in turn means the community is well supported.
  2. Find a way to highlight, promote, and reward your open source contributors, both internal and external. Facebook has periodic reports that highlight its open source heroes. This helps raise the profile of engineers and their work with managers who may sometimes not be managers of that open source project.
  3. As a central program office, find pain points that cut across the various projects and tackle them.

For example, many projects had previously built their own commit copying scripts and it was the number one pain point from a survey they ran at that time. FBShipIt, which copies commits between repositories, was built to address this and it’s owned by the open source team. It moved the burden off the engineering teams and is universally praised for helping smooth the workflow for pulling in external contributions.

Acknowledgments

For this feature we interviewed Christine Abernathy (@abernathyca), Open Source Developer Advocate at Facebook, to learn more about the Facebook’s open source program. Libby Clark performed the interview.

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OS Summit keynotes

Watch keynotes and technical sessions from OS Summit and ELC Europe here.

If you weren’t able to attend Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) Europe last week, don’t worry! We’ve recorded keynote presentations from both events and all the technical sessions from ELC Europe to share with you here.

Check out the on-stage conversation with Linus Torvalds and VMware’s Dirk Hohndel, opening remarks from The Linux Foundation’s Executive Director Jim Zemlin, and a special presentation from 11-year-old CyberShaolin founder Reuben Paul. You can watch these and other ELC and OS Summit keynotes below for insight into open source collaboration, community and technical expertise on containers, cloud computing, embedded Linux, Linux kernel, networking, and much more.

And, you can watch all 55+ technical sessions from Embedded Linux Conference here.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video link=”http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLQZzEvavGs&list=PLbzoR-pLrL6pISWAq-1cXP4_UZAyRtesk&index=1″][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video 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participating in open source

The Linux Foundation’s free online guide Participating in Open Source Communities can help organizations successfully navigate open source waters.

As companies in and out of the technology industry move to advance their open source programs, they are rapidly learning about the value of participating in open source communities. Organizations are using open source code to build their own commercial products and services, which drives home the strategic value of contributing back to projects.

However, diving in and participating without an understanding of projects and their communities can lead to frustration and other unfortunate outcomes. Approaching open source contributions without a strategy can tarnish a company’s reputation in the open source community and incur legal risks.

The Linux Foundation’s free online guide Participating in Open Source Communities can help organizations successfully navigate these open source waters. The detailed guide covers what it means to contribute to open source as an organization and what it means to be a good corporate citizen. It explains how open source projects are structured, how to contribute, why it’s important to devote internal developer resources to participation, as well as why it’s important to create a strategy for open source participation and management.

One of the most important first steps is to rally leadership behind your community participation strategy. “Support from leadership and acknowledgement that open source is a business critical part of your strategy is so important,” said Nithya Ruff, Senior Director, Open Source Practice at Comcast. “You should really understand the company’s objectives and how to enable them in your open source strategy.”

Building relationships is good strategy

The guide also notes that building relationships at events can make a difference, and that including community members early and often is a good strategy. “Some organizations make the mistake of developing big chunks of code in house and then dumping them into the open source project, which is almost never seen as a positive way to engage with the community,” the guide notes. “The reality is that open source projects can be complex, and what seems like an obvious change might have far reaching side effects in other parts of the project.”

Through the guide, you can also learn how to navigate issues of influence in community participation. It can be challenging for organizations to understand how influence is earned within open source projects. “Just because your organization is a big deal, doesn’t mean that you should expect to be treated like one without earning the respect of the open source community,” the guide advises.

The Participating in Open Source Communities guide can help you with these strategies and more, and it explores how to weave community focus into your open source initiatives. It is one of a new collection of free guides from The Linux Foundation and The TODO Group that provide essential information for any organization running an open source program. The guides are available now to help you run an open source program office where open source is supported, shared, and leveraged. With such an office, organizations can efficiently establish and execute on their open source strategies.

These guides were produced based on expertise from open source leaders. Check out the guides and stay tuned for our continuing coverage.

Don’t miss the previous articles in the series:

How to Create an Open Source Program

Tools for Managing Open Source Programs

Measuring Your Open Source Program’s Success

Effective Strategies for Recruiting Open Source Developers

APIs

Learn tricks, shortcuts, and key lessons learned in creating a Developer Experience team, at APIStrat.

Many companies that provide an API also include SDKs. At SendGrid, such SDKs send several billions of emails monthly through SendGrid’s Web API. Recently, SendGrid re-built their seven open source SDKs (Python, PHP, C#, Ruby, Node.js, Java, and Go) to support 233 API endpoints, a process which I’ll describe in my upcoming talk at APIStrat in Portland.

Fortunately, when we started this undertaking, Matt Bernier had just launched our Developer Experience team, covering our open source documentation and libraries. I joined the team as the first Developer Experience Engineer, with a charter to manage the open source libraries in order to ensure a fast and painless integration with every API SendGrid produces.

Our first task on the Developer Engineering side was to update all of the core SendGrid SDKs, across all seven programming languages, to support the newly released third version of the SendGrid Web API and its hundreds of endpoints. At the time, our SDKs only supported the email sending endpoint for version 2 of the API, so this was a major task for one person. Based on our velocity, we calculated that it would take about 8 years to hand code every single endpoint into each library.

This effort involved automated integration test creation and execution with a Swagger/OAI powered mock API server, documentation, code, examples, CLAs, backlogs, and sending out swag. Along the way, we also gained some insights on what should not be automated — like HTTP clients.

In my talk at APIStrat, I am going to share some tricks, automations, shortcuts, and key lessons that I learned on our journey to creating a Developer Experience team:

  • We will walk through what we automated and why, including how we leveraged OpenAPI and StopLight.io to automate SDK documentation, code, examples, and tests.
  • Then we’ll dive into how we used CLA-Assistant.io to automate CLA signing and management along with Kotis’ API to automate sending and managing swag for our contributors.
  • We’ll explore how these changes were received by our community, how we adapted to their feedback and prioritized with the RICE framework.

If you’re interested in attending, please take a moment to register and sign up for my talk. I hope to see you there!

OpenStack Summit Sydney

OpenStack Summit Sydney offers 11+ session tracks and plenty of educational workshops, tutorials, panels. Start planning your schedule now.

Going to OpenStack Summit Sydney? While you’re there, be sure stop by The Linux Foundation training booth for fun giveaways and a chance to win a Raspberry Pi kit. The drawing for prizes will take place 1 week after the conference on November 15.

Giveaways include The Linux Foundation projects’ stickers, and free ebooks: The SysAdmin’s Essential Guide to Linux Workstation Security, Practical GPL Compliance, A Guide to Understanding OPNFV & NFV, and the Open Source Guide Volume 1.

With 11+ session tracks to choose from, and plenty of educational workshops, tutorials, panels — start planning your schedule at OpenStack Summit in Sydney now.

Session tracks include:

  • Architecture & Operations
  • Birds of a Feather
  • Cloud & OpenStack 101
  • Community & Leadership
  • Containers & Cloud-Native Apps
  • Contribution & Upstream Development
  • Enterprise
  • Forum
  • Government
  • Hands-on Workshop
  • Open Source Days
  • And More.

View the full OpenStack Summit Sydney schedule here.

Cloud Native Computing Foundation and Cloud Foundry will also have a booth at OpenStack Summit Sydney. Get your pass to OpenStack and stop by to learn more!

“Recruiting Open Source Developers” is a free online guide to help organizations looking to attract new developers or build internal talent.

Experienced open source developers are in short supply. To attract top talent, companies often have to do more than hire a recruiter or place an ad on a popular job site. However, if you are running an open source program at your organization, the program itself can be leveraged as a very effective recruiting tool. That is precisely where the new, free online guide Recruiting Open Source Developers comes in. It can help any organization in recruiting developers, or building internal talent, through nurturing an open source culture, contributing to open source communities, and showcasing the utility of new open source projects.

Why does your organization need a recruiting strategy? One reason is that the growing shortage of skilled developers is well documented. According to a recent Cloud Foundry report, there are a quarter-million job openings for software developers in the U.S. alone and half a million unfilled jobs that require tech skills. They’re also forecasting the number of unfillable developer jobs to reach one million within the next decade.

Appeal to motivation

That’s a problem, but there are solutions. Effective recruitment appeals to developer motivation. If you understand what attracts developers to work for you, and on your open source projects (and open source, in general) you can structure your recruitment strategies in a way that appeals to them. As the Recruiting Open Source developers guide notes, developers want three things: rewards, respect and purpose.

The guide explains that your recruitment strategy can benefit greatly if you initially hire people who are leaders in open source. “Domain expertise and leadership in open source can sometimes take quite a long time at established companies,” said Guy Martin, Director of Open at Autodesk. “You need to put training together and start working with people in the company to begin to groom them for that kind of leadership. But, sometimes initially you’ve got to bootstrap by hiring people who are already leaders in those communities.”

Train internal talent

Another key strategy that the guide covers is training internal talent to advance open source projects and communities. “You will want to spend time training developers who show an interest or eagerness in contributing to open source,” the guide notes. “It pays to cultivate this next level of developers and include them in the open source decision-making process. Developers gain respect and recognition through their technical contributions to open source projects and their leadership in open source communities.”

In addition, it makes a lot of sense to set up internal systems for tracking the value of contributions to open source. The goal is to foster pride in contributions and emphasize that your organization cares about open source.  “You can’t throw a stone more than five feet in the cloud and not hit something that’s in open source,” said Guy Martin. “We absolutely have to have open source talent in the company to drive what we’re trying to do moving forward.”

Startups, including those in stealth mode, can apply these strategies as well. They can have developers work on public open source projects to establish their influence and showcase it for possible incoming talent. Developers have choices in open source, so the goal is to make your organization attractive for the talent to apply.

Within the guide, Ibrahim Haddid (@IbrahimAtLinux) recommends the following strategies for advancing recruitment strategies:

  1. Hire key developers and maintainers from the open source projects that are important to you.
  2. Allow your developers working on products to spend a certain % of their time contributing upstream.
  3. Set up a mentorship program where senior and more experienced developers guide junior, less experienced ones.
  4. Develop and offer both technical and open source methodology training to your developers.
  5. Participate in open source events. Send your developers and support them in presenting their work.
  6. Provide proper IT infrastructure that will allow your developers to communicate and work with the global open source community without any challenges.
  7. Set up an internal system to track the contributions of your developers and measure their impact.
  8. Internally, plan on contributing and focus on areas that are useful to more than one business unit/ product line.

The Recruiting Open Source Developers guide can help you with all these strategies and more, and it explores how to weave open source itself into your strategies. It is one of a new collection of free guides from The Linux Foundation and The TODO Group that are all extremely valuable for any organization running an open source program. The guides are available now to help you run an open source program office where open source is supported, shared, and leveraged. With such an office, organizations can establish and execute on their open source strategies efficiently, with clear terms.

These guides were produced based on expertise from open source leaders. Check out the guides and stay tuned for our continuing coverage.

Also, don’t miss the previous articles in the series: How to Create an Open Source Program; Tools for Managing Open Source Programs; and Measuring Your Open Source Program’s Success.

MesosCon

Sign up for free live video streaming of all keynote sessions at MesosCon Europe.

Can’t make it to MesosCon Europe in Prague this week? The Linux Foundation is pleased to offer free live video streaming of all keynote sessions on Thursday, Oct 26 and Friday, Oct 27, 2017.

MesosCon is an annual conference organized by the Apache Mesos community, bringing together users and developers to share and learn about the project and its growing ecosystem. Users, developers, experts, and community members will convene next week.

Apache Software Foundation, Mesosphere, and Netflix are among the many organizations that will keynote next week.

The livestream will begin on Thursday, Oct. 26 at 9 a.m. CEST (Central European Summer Time). Sign up now! You can also follow our live event updates on Twitter with #MesosCon.

All keynotes will be broadcasted live, including a welcome and opening remarks by Ben Hindman, Co-Creator, Apache Mesos and Founder, Mesosphere.

Other featured keynotes include:

  • Rich Bowen, VP Conferences, Apache Software Foundation will analyze The Apache Way.
  • Katharina Probst, Netflix will talk about making and keeping Netflix highly available.
  • SMACK in the enterprise panel.
  • Pierre Cheynier, Operations Engineer, Criteo will discuss operating 600+ Mesos servers on 7 data centers.
  • And more.

View the full schedule of keynotes.

Sign up now for the free live video stream.

Once you sign up, you’ll be able to view the livestream on the same page. If you sign up prior to the livestream day/time, simply return to this page and you’ll be able to view.

 

Open Source Summit livestream

The Linux Foundation is pleased to offer free live video streaming of all keynote sessions at Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference Europe, Oct. 23 to Oct. 25, 2017.

Join 2000 technologists and community members next week as they convene at Open Source Summit Europe and Embedded Linux Conference Europe in Prague. If you can’t be there in person, you can still take part, as The Linux Foundation is pleased to offer free live video streaming of all keynote sessions on Monday, Oct. 23 through Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017.  So, you can watch the event keynotes presented by Google, Intel, and VMware, among others.

The livestream will begin on Monday, Oct. 23 at 9 a.m. CEST (Central European Summer Time). Sign up now! You can also follow our live event updates on Twitter with #OSSummit.

All keynotes will be broadcasted live, including talks by Keila Banks, 15-year-old Programmer, Web Designer, and Technologist with her father Philip Banks; Mitchell Hashimoto, Founder, HashiCorp Founder of HashiCorp and Creator of Vagrant, Packer, Serf, Consul, Terraform, Vault and Nomad; Jan Kizska, Senior Key Expert, Siemens AG; Dirk Hohndel, VP & Chief Open Source Officer, VMware in a Conversation with Linux and Git Creator Linus Torvalds; Michael Dolan, Vice President of Strategic Programs & The Linux Foundation; and Jono Bacon, Community/Developer Strategy Consultant and Author.

Other featured conference keynotes include:

  • Neha Narkhede — Co-Founder & CTO of Confluent will discuss Apache Kafka and the Rise of the Streaming Platform
  • Reuben Paul — 11-year-old Hacker, CyberShaolin Founder and cybersecurity ambassador will talk about how Hacking is Child’s Play
  • Arpit Joshipura — General Manager, Networking, The Linux Foundation who will discuss Open Source Networking and a Vision of Fully Automated Networks
  • Imad Sousou — Vice President and General Manager, Software & Services Group, Intel
  • Sarah Novotny — Head of Open Source Strategy for GCP, Google
  • And more

View the full schedule of keynotes.

And sign up now for the free live video stream.

Once you sign up to watch the event keynotes, you’ll be able to view the livestream on the same page. If you sign up prior to the livestream day/time, simply return to this page and you’ll be able to view.