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Open Networking Summit

Speak at the largest open networking and orchestration event of 2018.

The Linux Foundation has just opened the Open Networking Summit North America (ONS NA) 2018 Call for Proposals, and we invite you to share your expertise with over 2,000 technical and business leaders in the networking ecosystem. Proposals are due by 11:59pm PT on Jan. 14, 2018.

Over 2,000 attendees are expected to attend ONS North America 2018, taking place March 26-29 in Los Angeles, including technical and business leaders across enterprise, service providers, and cloud providers. ONS North America is the only event of its kind, bringing networking and orchestration innovations together with a focus on the convergence of business (CIO/CTO/Architects) and technical (DevOps) communities.

Sign up to get the latest updates on ONS NA 2018!

Open Networking Summit NA conference tracks will include the following topical areas:

Track 1: (General Interest) Networking Futures in IoT, AI, and Network Learning. Including discussions on the progress in standards and open source interworking to drive the industry forward. We’re also seeking topics on networking as it relates to Kubernetes, cloud native, network automation, containers, microservices, and the network’s role in connected cars and connected things.

Track 2: (General Interest) Networking Business and Architecture. We’re looking for proposals on how to effectively evaluate the total cost of ownership of hybrid (public/private, SDN/NFV + traditional, proprietary/open source) environments, including acquisition strategies and good cost models for open source solutions. We’re also interested in case studies of open source business models for solution providers.

Track 3: (Technical) Service Provider & Cloud Networking. We want to hear what you have to say about the containerization of service provider workloads, multi-cloud, 5G, fog, and edge access cloud networking.

Track 4: (Business & Architecture) Service Provider & Cloud Networking. We’re seeking proposals on software-defined packet-optical, mobile edge computing, 4G video/CDN, 5G networking, and incorporating legacy systems (legacy enterprise workload migration, role of networking in cloud migration, and interworking of carrier OSS/BSS/FCAPS systems).

Track 5: (Technical) Enterprise IT & DevOps. Share your experience on scale and performance in SDN deployments, expanding container networking, maintaining stability in migration, networking needs of a hybrid cloud/virtualized environment, and figuring out the roadmap from a cost perspective.

Track 6: (Business and Architecture) Enterprise IT (CXO/IT Architects). Do you have use cases to share on IoT and networking from the retail, transportation, utility, healthcare or government sectors? We’re looking for proposals on cost modeling for hybrid environments, automation (network and beyond), analytics, security and risk management/modeling with ML, and NFV for the enterprise.

View here for more details on suggested topics, and submit your proposal before the January 14 deadline.

Get inspired! Watch presentations from ONS 2017.

See all keynotes from ONS 2017.

Not submitting but planning to attend? Register by Feb. 11 and save $800!

open source marketing

In Deirdré Straughan’s talk at Open Source Summit, she explained common marketing approaches and why they’re important for open source projects.

The widely experienced and indefatigable Deirdré Straughan presented a talk at Open Source Summit NA on how to market an open source project. Deirdré currently works with open source at Amazon Web Services (AWS), although she was not representing the company at the time of her talk. Her experience also includes stints at Ericsson, Joyent, and Oracle, where she worked with cloud and open source over several years.

Through it all, Deirdré said, the main mission in her career has been to “help technologies grow and thrive through a variety of marketing and community activities.” This article provides highlights of Deirdré’s talk, in which she explained common marketing approaches and why they’re important for open source projects.

Why you have to market free stuff

So, what is marketing? At its most basic, she said, marketing is about getting people to exchange their money for goods and services. So you might think: “Marketing is about selling. Open source is free. I don’t have to try to sell anything, so why would I need marketing?”

open source marketing

Deirdré Straughan

But, you are selling something. You are selling ideas, and the currency you are requesting in return is something extremely valuable, which is people’s time and attention. That may feel counterintuitive, because open source generally means giving something away, but it does have substance and it does have worth. In fact, it is so worthwhile  that people contribute time, money, talent, and effort to the cause. However, they can only do that if they are aware of your project and convinced of the value of supporting it.

Additionally, competition is fierce, said Deirdré. To succeed, your project must compete for attention and support with some 25 and a half million other open source projects. Thus, open source marketing is about capturing very scarce attention and resources in a very crowded environment. It’s about attracting people and resources to your project, which can be difficult to do.

According to Deirdré, the main resource projects need is people — their time and effort. They may be people who use your project, or they may be contributors. Of those who are contributors, some will work independently, often in their spare time. Others may be assigned a project by their employer, or, as is increasingly common, be specifically hired to work on a particular open source project.

“And, yes, in some cases, you are also asking for money. We would all like to believe that pure technical goodness will be rewarded, and that we should never have to think about money. However, most of us need some money to survive,” she said.

Open source is increasingly supported by companies, but many companies are unsure about which projects to invest in. To succeed, your project needs to rise above the crowd and to attract not just independent contributors, but also companies that could offer material support.

Common points of failure in marketing

“Even so, marketing often fails to happen in open source. A common reason is that many people in tech despise marketing. But you shouldn’t automatically recoil from the mere mention of marketing, because you need to be doing it if you want to survive. It will be difficult to do marketing well, if you go into it thinking it’s sleazy,” Deirdré said.

Sometimes resistance to marketing comes from a literal machismo, according to Deirdré. Marketing is considered a soft skill, a job for women, as opposed to the (ahem) “manly” work of coding. It is perceived as a lower-status role (until you get to the VP or CMO level). Other reasons for lack of marketing involve lack of funding, or simply the fact that nobody working on a project happens to know how to do it.

At its best, Deirdré said, marketing helps people understand what the technology is about, and how they can use it. It is a form of  communication that is informative, truthful, convincing, and even inspiring.

Marketing tools

There are many marketing tools readily available. First in importance, Deirdré said, is your code. GitHub is your resumé. Your basic code should be architectured purposefully and offer the capability to write libraries or modules so that the barriers to entry for a newcomer are fairly low. It should be well coded and offer tools that help people learn to use and contribute to your project.  

A common pitfall relates to documentation. Many companies don’t bother with it, but documentation will help attract people to your project. Documentation usually explains all the commands and parameters and what the output means. This information is necessary, but insufficient. Additional types of documentation are needed, according to Deirdré, such as, white papers, blogs, video, podcasts, and conference talks.

Once you’ve created all this content, you need a place to put it. Obviously, a GitHub repo is necessary, but you’ll also need a website and/or wiki.

Discoverability is crucial, Deirdré said. You have created all this content, but people still have to find it. Toward that end, you should be cautious about project names. For example, if your project name is also a common word, searching for it is going to be difficult. To maximize results in a search engine, you can use keyword tags and categories that will help people find your project.

Search engine optimization is an arcane art. Being on the first page of search results for a keyword is extremely valuable. For that reason, “SEO best practice changes frequently, as search engines are in an arms race with the black hats who want to game search results,” she said. “You can easily find recent tips and tricks on how to improve your rankings. However, it usually takes about a year to make any real progress in search engine rankings. You’ll need patience.”

Community

Everything that touches the customer is marketing, Deirdré said. For example, consider airlines. Everything about the airline experience affects what consumers  think about the airline. From buying a ticket, the check-in process, boarding, the plane ride and experience, the atmosphere of the airport, timeliness in departures and arrivals, and whether luggage arrived on time and unscathed — all of these processes and experiences help shape the consumer’s opinion of the brand.

“This is also true for technology, and especially for communities and projects. Everything that somebody experiences around your project — good or bad — affects their perception of that project and whether they are going to want to participate in it,” she said.

So, community is important. Community culture is important, as is diversity.  Nurture your community. If your open source community is not diverse, ask yourself why, and think about how you can attract a wider range of participation.

Diversity also means diversity of contribution. Does your project recognize and value contribution beyond just the code? Again, you’re asking people to help you do this work, so make sure that they’re recognized for it.

Kindness also matters

Look closely at the newbie experience. What is it like onboarding someone to your technology? Think, too, about growing pains. Projects, like startups, can reach a critical inflection point, when there is rapid success but things start to fall apart, because there just aren’t enough people to respond quickly.

“In conclusion, I’d like you to take away that marketing is not evil. You may already be doing it. You just may not think of some of what you’re doing as marketing,” Deirdré said.

“And marketing, particularly that which is appropriate for open source, is mostly stuff you’re probably already doing, or at least know how to do. There are even people out there who would love to help. They’re just waiting to be asked.”

Deirdré Straughan is the Content Lead for the AWS Open Source Community Engagement team. Her work for AWS includes the new AWS Open Source blog and @AWSOpen on Twitter. You can find her at @deirdres on Twitter.

OpenStack

The OpenStack Foundation team has been thinking about what “open” means for the project. Learn more.

In his keynote at OpenStack Summit in Australia, Jonathan Bryce (Executive Director of the OpenStack Foundation) stressed on the meaning of both “Open” and “Stack” in the name of the project and focused on the importance of collaboration within the OpenStack ecosystem.

OpenStack has enjoyed unprecedented success since its early days. It has excited the IT industry about applications at scale and created new ways to consume cloud. The adoption rate of OpenStack and the growth of its community exceeded even the biggest open source project on the planet, Linux. In its short life of 6 years, OpenStack has achieved more than Linux did in a similar time span.

So, why does OpenStack need to redefine the meaning of the project and stress collaboration? Why now?

“We have reached a point where the technology has proven itself,” said Mark Collier, the CTO of the OpenStack Foundation. “You have seen all the massive use case of OpenStack all around the globe.”

Collier said that the OpenStack community is all about solving problems. Although they continue to refine compute, storage, and networking, they also look beyond that.

With big adoption and big growth, come new challenges. The OpenStack community and the OpenStack Foundation responded to those challenges and the project transformed along with changing market dynamics — evolving from integrated release to big tent to composability.

OpenStack community

One of the things that the Foundation team has been doing this year is thinking about what “open” means for the project. In the past five years, OpenStack has built a great community around it. There are more than 82,000 people from around the globe who are part of this huge community. The big question for the Foundation was, what’s next for the coming five years? The first thing that they looked at was what got them to this position.

When you put this all into context, Bryce’s stress on openness and collaboration makes sense. In an interview with The Linux Foundation, Bryce said, “We haven’t really talked a lot about our attitude around openness. I think that it’s a little bit overdue because when you look into the technology industry right now you see the term ‘open’ thrown around constantly. The word open gets attached to different products, it gets attached to different vendor conferences because who doesn’t want something that’s open.”

“One of the key things has been those four opens that we use as the pillars of our community:  how we write our code, how we design our systems, how we manage our development process, and how we interact as a community,” said Bryce.

When you look at the stack part of OpenStack, there is no single component that builds the OpenStack cloud; there are many different components that come from different independent open source projects. These components are the part of the stack. “We’re building technology stack but it’s not a rigid stack and it’s not a single approach to doing things. It’s actually a flexible programmable infrastructure technology stack,” Bryce said.

What’s really interesting about these different open source projects is that in most cases they work in silos. Whether it’s KVM or Open vSwitch or Kubernetes, they are developed independently of each other.

“And that’s not a bad thing, actually,” Byce said, “because you want experts in a topic who are focused on that. This expertise gives you a really good container orchestration system, a really good distributed storage system, a software defined networking system. But users don’t run those things independently. There isn’t a single OpenStack cloud on the planet that only runs software that we wrote in the OpenStack community.”

Staying in sync

One big problem that the OpenStack community saw was big gaps between these projects.

“There are issues to keep in sync between these different open source projects that have different release cadence,” said Bryce. “So far, we’ve left it to users to solve those problems, but we realized we can do better than that. And that’s where the focus is in terms of collaboration.”

The OpenStack community has been working with other communities from day one. Collaboration has always been the core of the project. Bryce used the example of KVM project, one of the many projects that OpenStack users use.

“When we started the OpenStack project, KVM was not widely considered a production-ready hypervisor,” said Bryce. “There were a lot of features that were new, unstable and totally unreliable. But OpenStack became a big driver for KVM usage. OpenStack developers contributed upstream to KVM and that combination ended up helping both Nova and KVM mature because we were jointly delivering real use cases.”

It’s happening all across the board now. For example, Bryce mentioned a report from Research 451 that said that companies that already have OpenStack were adopting containers three times faster than those who don’t.

Yes, the collaboration has been happening, but there is huge potential in refining that collaboration. Collier said that the OpenStack community members who have been gluing these different projects together have gained expertise in doing so. The OpenStack Foundation plans to help members of the community share this expertise and experience with each other.

“The Open Source community loves to give back,” said Collier. “This collaboration is about sharing the playbook — both software and operational know how — that allows you to take this innovation and put it into production.”

“Those are the missing links, the last mile of open infrastructure the users have had to do on their own. We’re bringing that into the community and that’s where I think the collaboration becomes critical,” added Collier.

“How do you deliver that collaboration?” said Bryce. “Writing software is hard, but it becomes less hard when you get people together. That’s something people forget in the open source community as we work remotely, collaborating online, from different parts of the world.”

Face to Face Collaboration

Physical events like OpenStack Summit, Open Source Summit, KubeCon, and many others bring these people together, face to face.

“Meeting each other in person is extremely valuable. It builds trust and when we go back to our remote location and collaborate online, that trust makes us even more productive,” said Bryce.

Going forward, OpenStack Foundation plans to make its events inclusive of all those technologies that matter to OpenStack users. They have started events like OpenStack Days that include projects such as Ceph, Ansible, Kubernetes, Cloud Foundry, and more.

“When you meet people,  spend time with them and work together, you naturally start to understand each other better and figure out how to work together,” said Bryce. “And that to me is a really important part of how you actually make collaboration happen.”

open source community

Zachary Dupont wrote a letter to his hero Linus Torvalds back in 2014. Here, they catch up on stage at Open Source Summit NA 2017.

The Linux Foundation works through our projects, training and certification programs, events and more to bring people of all backgrounds into open source. We meet a lot of people, but find the drive and enthusiasm of some of our youngest community members to be especially infectious. In the past couple of months, we’ve invited 13-year-old algorithmist and cognitive developer Tanmay Bakshi, 11-year-old hacker and cybersecurity ambassador Reuben Paul, and 15-year-old programmer Keila Banks to speak at Linux Foundation conferences.

In 2014 when he was 12, Zachary Dupont wrote a letter to his hero Linus Torvalds. We arranged for Zach to meet Linus–a visit that helped clinch his love for Linux. This year, Zach came to Open Source Summit in Los Angeles to catch up with Linus and let us know what he’s been up to. He’s kept busy with an internship at SAP and early acceptance to the Computer Networking and Digital Forensics program at the Delaware County Technical School.

The open source community encouraged Zach to pursue his passions. They’ve inspired him, and he plans to give back in the future.

We encourage everyone to find ways to bring more people of all ages into open source. Volunteer your time to teach students or people making mid-career changes how to code, spend time on writing documentation for your open source project so others can get to know it better, or simply take the time to answer beginner questions on message boards. The more people we bring into the community, the stronger we will be in the years ahead.

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]1. LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen China
Developers, architects, sysadmins, DevOps experts, business leaders, and other professionals gathered in June to discuss open source technology and trends at the first-ever LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen (LC3) event in China. At the event, Linus Torvalds spoke about how Linux still surprises and motivates him.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23077″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]2. Toyota Camry Will Feature Automotive Grade Linux
At Automotive Linux Summit in Japan, Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), announced that Toyota has adopted the AGL platform for their next-generation infotainment system.The 2018 Camry will be the first Toyota vehicle on the market with the AGL-based system in the United States.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23078″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]3. Open Source Summit Debuts
As announced at last year’s LinuxCon in Toronto, this annual event hosted by The Linux Foundation is now called Open Source Summit. It combines LinuxCon, ContainerCon, and CloudOpen conferences along with two new conferences: Open Community Conference and Diversity Empowerment Summit.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23079″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]4. Joseph Gordon-Levitt at OS Summit North America
Actor Joseph Gordon-Levitt, founder and director of the online production company HITRECORD, spoke at Open Source Summit in Los Angeles about his experiences with collaborative technologies. Gordon-Levitt shared lessons learned along with a video created through the company.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23080″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]5. Diversity Empowerment Summit
Tameika Reed, founder of Women in Linux, spoke at the Diversity Empowerment Summit in Los Angeles about the need for diversity in all facets of tech, including education, training, conferences, and mentoring. The new event aims to help promote and facilitate an increase in diversity, inclusion, empowerment, and social innovation in the open source community.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23081″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]6. Hyperledger Growth
Hyperledger — the largest open blockchain consortium — now includes 180 diverse organizations and has recently partnered with edX to launch an online MOOC. At Open Source Summit in Los Angeles, Executive Director Brian Behlendorf spoke with theCUBE about the project’s growth and potential to solve important problems.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23082″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]7. Lyft and Uber on Stage at Open Source Summit
At Open Source Summit in Los Angeles, ride-sharing rivals Lyft and Uber appeared on stage to introduce two new projects donated to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. Chris Lambert, CTO of Lyft (on left), and Yuri Shkuro, Staff Engineer at Uber, introduced the projects, which help CNCF fill some gaps in the landscape of technologies used to adopt a cloud-native computing model.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23083″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]8. Attendee Reception at Paramount Studios
The Open Source Summit North America evening reception for all attendees was held at iconic Paramount Studios in Hollywood. Attendees enjoyed a behind-the-scenes studio tour featuring authentic Paramount movie props and costumes.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23084″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]9. 2017 Linux Kernel Summit and Kernel Development Report
Open source technologists gathered in the city of Prague, Czech Republic in October for Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference Europe. Co-located events included MesosCon Europe, KVM Forum, and Linux Kernel Summit, where The Linux Foundation released the latest Linux Kernel Development Report highlighting some of the dedicated kernel contributors.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23085″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]10. The Next Generation of Open Source Technologists
The Linux Foundation 2017 events aimed to inspire the younger generation with an interest in open source technologies through activities like Kids Day and special keynotes, such as those from 13-year-old algorithmist and cognitive developer Tanmay Bakshi, 11-year-old hacker and cybersecurity ambassador Reuben Paul (pictured here), and 15-year-old programmer and technologist Keila Banks.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23086″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]You can look forward to more exciting events in 2018. Check out the newly released 2018 Events calendar and make plans now to attend or to speak at an upcoming conference.

Speaking proposals are now being accepted for the following 2018 events:

Submit a Proposal[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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OS Summit keynotes

Watch keynotes and technical sessions from OS Summit and ELC Europe here.

If you weren’t able to attend Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) Europe last week, don’t worry! We’ve recorded keynote presentations from both events and all the technical sessions from ELC Europe to share with you here.

Check out the on-stage conversation with Linus Torvalds and VMware’s Dirk Hohndel, opening remarks from The Linux Foundation’s Executive Director Jim Zemlin, and a special presentation from 11-year-old CyberShaolin founder Reuben Paul. You can watch these and other ELC and OS Summit keynotes below for insight into open source collaboration, community and technical expertise on containers, cloud computing, embedded Linux, Linux kernel, networking, and much more.

And, you can watch all 55+ technical sessions from Embedded Linux Conference here.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video link=”http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLQZzEvavGs&list=PLbzoR-pLrL6pISWAq-1cXP4_UZAyRtesk&index=1″][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video 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APIs

Learn tricks, shortcuts, and key lessons learned in creating a Developer Experience team, at APIStrat.

Many companies that provide an API also include SDKs. At SendGrid, such SDKs send several billions of emails monthly through SendGrid’s Web API. Recently, SendGrid re-built their seven open source SDKs (Python, PHP, C#, Ruby, Node.js, Java, and Go) to support 233 API endpoints, a process which I’ll describe in my upcoming talk at APIStrat in Portland.

Fortunately, when we started this undertaking, Matt Bernier had just launched our Developer Experience team, covering our open source documentation and libraries. I joined the team as the first Developer Experience Engineer, with a charter to manage the open source libraries in order to ensure a fast and painless integration with every API SendGrid produces.

Our first task on the Developer Engineering side was to update all of the core SendGrid SDKs, across all seven programming languages, to support the newly released third version of the SendGrid Web API and its hundreds of endpoints. At the time, our SDKs only supported the email sending endpoint for version 2 of the API, so this was a major task for one person. Based on our velocity, we calculated that it would take about 8 years to hand code every single endpoint into each library.

This effort involved automated integration test creation and execution with a Swagger/OAI powered mock API server, documentation, code, examples, CLAs, backlogs, and sending out swag. Along the way, we also gained some insights on what should not be automated — like HTTP clients.

In my talk at APIStrat, I am going to share some tricks, automations, shortcuts, and key lessons that I learned on our journey to creating a Developer Experience team:

  • We will walk through what we automated and why, including how we leveraged OpenAPI and StopLight.io to automate SDK documentation, code, examples, and tests.
  • Then we’ll dive into how we used CLA-Assistant.io to automate CLA signing and management along with Kotis’ API to automate sending and managing swag for our contributors.
  • We’ll explore how these changes were received by our community, how we adapted to their feedback and prioritized with the RICE framework.

If you’re interested in attending, please take a moment to register and sign up for my talk. I hope to see you there!

OpenStack Summit Sydney

OpenStack Summit Sydney offers 11+ session tracks and plenty of educational workshops, tutorials, panels. Start planning your schedule now.

Going to OpenStack Summit Sydney? While you’re there, be sure stop by The Linux Foundation training booth for fun giveaways and a chance to win a Raspberry Pi kit. The drawing for prizes will take place 1 week after the conference on November 15.

Giveaways include The Linux Foundation projects’ stickers, and free ebooks: The SysAdmin’s Essential Guide to Linux Workstation Security, Practical GPL Compliance, A Guide to Understanding OPNFV & NFV, and the Open Source Guide Volume 1.

With 11+ session tracks to choose from, and plenty of educational workshops, tutorials, panels — start planning your schedule at OpenStack Summit in Sydney now.

Session tracks include:

  • Architecture & Operations
  • Birds of a Feather
  • Cloud & OpenStack 101
  • Community & Leadership
  • Containers & Cloud-Native Apps
  • Contribution & Upstream Development
  • Enterprise
  • Forum
  • Government
  • Hands-on Workshop
  • Open Source Days
  • And More.

View the full OpenStack Summit Sydney schedule here.

Cloud Native Computing Foundation and Cloud Foundry will also have a booth at OpenStack Summit Sydney. Get your pass to OpenStack and stop by to learn more!

 

Open Source Summit livestream

The Linux Foundation is pleased to offer free live video streaming of all keynote sessions at Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference Europe, Oct. 23 to Oct. 25, 2017.

Join 2000 technologists and community members next week as they convene at Open Source Summit Europe and Embedded Linux Conference Europe in Prague. If you can’t be there in person, you can still take part, as The Linux Foundation is pleased to offer free live video streaming of all keynote sessions on Monday, Oct. 23 through Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017.  So, you can watch the event keynotes presented by Google, Intel, and VMware, among others.

The livestream will begin on Monday, Oct. 23 at 9 a.m. CEST (Central European Summer Time). Sign up now! You can also follow our live event updates on Twitter with #OSSummit.

All keynotes will be broadcasted live, including talks by Keila Banks, 15-year-old Programmer, Web Designer, and Technologist with her father Philip Banks; Mitchell Hashimoto, Founder, HashiCorp Founder of HashiCorp and Creator of Vagrant, Packer, Serf, Consul, Terraform, Vault and Nomad; Jan Kizska, Senior Key Expert, Siemens AG; Dirk Hohndel, VP & Chief Open Source Officer, VMware in a Conversation with Linux and Git Creator Linus Torvalds; Michael Dolan, Vice President of Strategic Programs & The Linux Foundation; and Jono Bacon, Community/Developer Strategy Consultant and Author.

Other featured conference keynotes include:

  • Neha Narkhede — Co-Founder & CTO of Confluent will discuss Apache Kafka and the Rise of the Streaming Platform
  • Reuben Paul — 11-year-old Hacker, CyberShaolin Founder and cybersecurity ambassador will talk about how Hacking is Child’s Play
  • Arpit Joshipura — General Manager, Networking, The Linux Foundation who will discuss Open Source Networking and a Vision of Fully Automated Networks
  • Imad Sousou — Vice President and General Manager, Software & Services Group, Intel
  • Sarah Novotny — Head of Open Source Strategy for GCP, Google
  • And more

View the full schedule of keynotes.

And sign up now for the free live video stream.

Once you sign up to watch the event keynotes, you’ll be able to view the livestream on the same page. If you sign up prior to the livestream day/time, simply return to this page and you’ll be able to view.

Open Source Summit EU

Going to Open Source Summit? Check out some featured conference presentations and activities below.

Going to Open Source Summit EU in Prague? While you’re there, be sure stop by The Linux Foundation training booth for fun giveaways and a chance to win one of three Raspberry Pi kits.

Giveaways include The Linux Foundation branded webcam covers, The Linux Foundation projects’ stickers, Tux stickers, Linux.com stickers, as well as free ebooks: The SysAdmin’s Essential Guide to Linux Workstation Security, Practical GPL Compliance, and A Guide to Understanding OPNFV & NFV.

You can also enter the raffle for a chance to win a Raspberry Pi Kit. There will be 3 raffle winners: names will be drawn and prizes will be mailed on Nov. 2.

And, be sure to check out some featured conference presentations below, including how to deploy Kubernetes native applications, deploying and scaling microservices, opportunities for inclusion and collaboration, and how to build your open source career.

Session Highlights

  • Love What You Do, Everyday! – Zaheda Bhorat, Amazon Web Services
  • Detecting Performance Regressions In The Linux Kernel – Jan Kara, SUSE
  • Highway to Helm: Deploying Kubernetes Native Applications – Michelle Noorali, Microsoft
  • Deploying and Scaling Microservices with Docker and Kubernetes – Jérôme Petazzoni, Docker
  • printk() – The Most Useful Tool is Now Showing its Age – Steven Rostedt, VMWare
  • Every Day Opportunities for Inclusion and Collaboration – Nithya Ruff, Comcast

Activities

  • Technical Showcase
  • Real-Time Summit
  • Free Day with Prague tour from local students
  • KVM Forum
  • FOSSology – Hands On Training
  • Tracing Summit

The Cloud Native Computing Foundation will also a have booth at OSSEU. Get your pass to Open Source Summit Europe and stop by to learn more! Use discount OSSEULFM20 code for 20% off your all-access attendee pass.

Check out the full list of co-located events on the website and register now.