Posts

“Recruiting Open Source Developers” is a free online guide to help organizations looking to attract new developers or build internal talent.

Experienced open source developers are in short supply. To attract top talent, companies often have to do more than hire a recruiter or place an ad on a popular job site. However, if you are running an open source program at your organization, the program itself can be leveraged as a very effective recruiting tool. That is precisely where the new, free online guide Recruiting Open Source Developers comes in. It can help any organization in recruiting developers, or building internal talent, through nurturing an open source culture, contributing to open source communities, and showcasing the utility of new open source projects.

Why does your organization need a recruiting strategy? One reason is that the growing shortage of skilled developers is well documented. According to a recent Cloud Foundry report, there are a quarter-million job openings for software developers in the U.S. alone and half a million unfilled jobs that require tech skills. They’re also forecasting the number of unfillable developer jobs to reach one million within the next decade.

Appeal to motivation

That’s a problem, but there are solutions. Effective recruitment appeals to developer motivation. If you understand what attracts developers to work for you, and on your open source projects (and open source, in general) you can structure your recruitment strategies in a way that appeals to them. As the Recruiting Open Source developers guide notes, developers want three things: rewards, respect and purpose.

The guide explains that your recruitment strategy can benefit greatly if you initially hire people who are leaders in open source. “Domain expertise and leadership in open source can sometimes take quite a long time at established companies,” said Guy Martin, Director of Open at Autodesk. “You need to put training together and start working with people in the company to begin to groom them for that kind of leadership. But, sometimes initially you’ve got to bootstrap by hiring people who are already leaders in those communities.”

Train internal talent

Another key strategy that the guide covers is training internal talent to advance open source projects and communities. “You will want to spend time training developers who show an interest or eagerness in contributing to open source,” the guide notes. “It pays to cultivate this next level of developers and include them in the open source decision-making process. Developers gain respect and recognition through their technical contributions to open source projects and their leadership in open source communities.”

In addition, it makes a lot of sense to set up internal systems for tracking the value of contributions to open source. The goal is to foster pride in contributions and emphasize that your organization cares about open source.  “You can’t throw a stone more than five feet in the cloud and not hit something that’s in open source,” said Guy Martin. “We absolutely have to have open source talent in the company to drive what we’re trying to do moving forward.”

Startups, including those in stealth mode, can apply these strategies as well. They can have developers work on public open source projects to establish their influence and showcase it for possible incoming talent. Developers have choices in open source, so the goal is to make your organization attractive for the talent to apply.

Within the guide, Ibrahim Haddid (@IbrahimAtLinux) recommends the following strategies for advancing recruitment strategies:

  1. Hire key developers and maintainers from the open source projects that are important to you.
  2. Allow your developers working on products to spend a certain % of their time contributing upstream.
  3. Set up a mentorship program where senior and more experienced developers guide junior, less experienced ones.
  4. Develop and offer both technical and open source methodology training to your developers.
  5. Participate in open source events. Send your developers and support them in presenting their work.
  6. Provide proper IT infrastructure that will allow your developers to communicate and work with the global open source community without any challenges.
  7. Set up an internal system to track the contributions of your developers and measure their impact.
  8. Internally, plan on contributing and focus on areas that are useful to more than one business unit/ product line.

The Recruiting Open Source Developers guide can help you with all these strategies and more, and it explores how to weave open source itself into your strategies. It is one of a new collection of free guides from The Linux Foundation and The TODO Group that are all extremely valuable for any organization running an open source program. The guides are available now to help you run an open source program office where open source is supported, shared, and leveraged. With such an office, organizations can establish and execute on their open source strategies efficiently, with clear terms.

These guides were produced based on expertise from open source leaders. Check out the guides and stay tuned for our continuing coverage.

Also, don’t miss the previous articles in the series: How to Create an Open Source Program; Tools for Managing Open Source Programs; and Measuring Your Open Source Program’s Success.

MesosCon

Sign up for free live video streaming of all keynote sessions at MesosCon Europe.

Can’t make it to MesosCon Europe in Prague this week? The Linux Foundation is pleased to offer free live video streaming of all keynote sessions on Thursday, Oct 26 and Friday, Oct 27, 2017.

MesosCon is an annual conference organized by the Apache Mesos community, bringing together users and developers to share and learn about the project and its growing ecosystem. Users, developers, experts, and community members will convene next week.

Apache Software Foundation, Mesosphere, and Netflix are among the many organizations that will keynote next week.

The livestream will begin on Thursday, Oct. 26 at 9 a.m. CEST (Central European Summer Time). Sign up now! You can also follow our live event updates on Twitter with #MesosCon.

All keynotes will be broadcasted live, including a welcome and opening remarks by Ben Hindman, Co-Creator, Apache Mesos and Founder, Mesosphere.

Other featured keynotes include:

  • Rich Bowen, VP Conferences, Apache Software Foundation will analyze The Apache Way.
  • Katharina Probst, Netflix will talk about making and keeping Netflix highly available.
  • SMACK in the enterprise panel.
  • Pierre Cheynier, Operations Engineer, Criteo will discuss operating 600+ Mesos servers on 7 data centers.
  • And more.

View the full schedule of keynotes.

Sign up now for the free live video stream.

Once you sign up, you’ll be able to view the livestream on the same page. If you sign up prior to the livestream day/time, simply return to this page and you’ll be able to view.

 

Open Source Summit livestream

The Linux Foundation is pleased to offer free live video streaming of all keynote sessions at Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference Europe, Oct. 23 to Oct. 25, 2017.

Join 2000 technologists and community members next week as they convene at Open Source Summit Europe and Embedded Linux Conference Europe in Prague. If you can’t be there in person, you can still take part, as The Linux Foundation is pleased to offer free live video streaming of all keynote sessions on Monday, Oct. 23 through Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017.  So, you can watch the event keynotes presented by Google, Intel, and VMware, among others.

The livestream will begin on Monday, Oct. 23 at 9 a.m. CEST (Central European Summer Time). Sign up now! You can also follow our live event updates on Twitter with #OSSummit.

All keynotes will be broadcasted live, including talks by Keila Banks, 15-year-old Programmer, Web Designer, and Technologist with her father Philip Banks; Mitchell Hashimoto, Founder, HashiCorp Founder of HashiCorp and Creator of Vagrant, Packer, Serf, Consul, Terraform, Vault and Nomad; Jan Kizska, Senior Key Expert, Siemens AG; Dirk Hohndel, VP & Chief Open Source Officer, VMware in a Conversation with Linux and Git Creator Linus Torvalds; Michael Dolan, Vice President of Strategic Programs & The Linux Foundation; and Jono Bacon, Community/Developer Strategy Consultant and Author.

Other featured conference keynotes include:

  • Neha Narkhede — Co-Founder & CTO of Confluent will discuss Apache Kafka and the Rise of the Streaming Platform
  • Reuben Paul — 11-year-old Hacker, CyberShaolin Founder and cybersecurity ambassador will talk about how Hacking is Child’s Play
  • Arpit Joshipura — General Manager, Networking, The Linux Foundation who will discuss Open Source Networking and a Vision of Fully Automated Networks
  • Imad Sousou — Vice President and General Manager, Software & Services Group, Intel
  • Sarah Novotny — Head of Open Source Strategy for GCP, Google
  • And more

View the full schedule of keynotes.

And sign up now for the free live video stream.

Once you sign up to watch the event keynotes, you’ll be able to view the livestream on the same page. If you sign up prior to the livestream day/time, simply return to this page and you’ll be able to view.

 

All Things Open

Join The Linux Foundation at All Things Open; check out conference highlights below. (Image: All Things Open)

Going to All Things Open in Raleigh? While you’re there, be sure stop by The Linux Foundation training booth for fun giveaways and a chance to win one of two Raspberry Pi kits. Two winners will be chosen onsite on the last day of the conference, Oct. 24, at 3:05pm.

Other booth giveaways include The Linux Foundation branded webcam covers, The Linux Foundation projects’ stickers, Tux stickers, Linux.com stickers, as well as free ebooks: The SysAdmin’s Essential Guide to Linux Workstation Security, Practical GPL Compliance, A Guide to Understanding OPNFV & NFV, and the Open Source Guide Volume 1.

Be sure to check out these featured conference talks, including the Linux on the Mainframe session where John Mertic and Len Santalucia discuss how they’ve worked to create an open source, technical community where industry participants can collaborate around the use of the Linux and open source in a mainframe computing environment. And don’t miss ODPi’s session on the simplification and standardization of the Big Data ecosystem with common reference specifications and test suites.

Session Highlights

  • Accelerating Big Data Implementations For the Connected World – John Mertic
  • Advancing the Next-Generation Open Networking Stack – Phil Robb
  • Flatpak: The Portable, Secure Distribution of Desktop ApplicationsOwen Taylor
  • Intel: Core Linux Enabling Case Study and Demo
  • Integrating Linux Systems With Active Directory Using Open Source Tools – Dmitri Pal
  • Linux On the Mainframe: Linux Foundation and The Open Mainframe Project – John Mertic & Len Santalucia
  • Polyglot System Administration AKA: Don’t Fear the Other Language – Jakob Lorberblatt
  • The Next Evolution of The Javascript Ecosystem – Kris Borchers
  • The Revolution Will Not Be Distributed – Michael Hall
  • You Think You’re Not A Target? A Tale Of Three Developers – Chris Lamb

ODPi and Open Mainframe will also a have booth at All Things Open. Get your pass to All Things Open and stop by to learn more!

 

Open Source Summit EU

Going to Open Source Summit? Check out some featured conference presentations and activities below.

Going to Open Source Summit EU in Prague? While you’re there, be sure stop by The Linux Foundation training booth for fun giveaways and a chance to win one of three Raspberry Pi kits.

Giveaways include The Linux Foundation branded webcam covers, The Linux Foundation projects’ stickers, Tux stickers, Linux.com stickers, as well as free ebooks: The SysAdmin’s Essential Guide to Linux Workstation Security, Practical GPL Compliance, and A Guide to Understanding OPNFV & NFV.

You can also enter the raffle for a chance to win a Raspberry Pi Kit. There will be 3 raffle winners: names will be drawn and prizes will be mailed on Nov. 2.

And, be sure to check out some featured conference presentations below, including how to deploy Kubernetes native applications, deploying and scaling microservices, opportunities for inclusion and collaboration, and how to build your open source career.

Session Highlights

  • Love What You Do, Everyday! – Zaheda Bhorat, Amazon Web Services
  • Detecting Performance Regressions In The Linux Kernel – Jan Kara, SUSE
  • Highway to Helm: Deploying Kubernetes Native Applications – Michelle Noorali, Microsoft
  • Deploying and Scaling Microservices with Docker and Kubernetes – Jérôme Petazzoni, Docker
  • printk() – The Most Useful Tool is Now Showing its Age – Steven Rostedt, VMWare
  • Every Day Opportunities for Inclusion and Collaboration – Nithya Ruff, Comcast

Activities

  • Technical Showcase
  • Real-Time Summit
  • Free Day with Prague tour from local students
  • KVM Forum
  • FOSSology – Hands On Training
  • Tracing Summit

The Cloud Native Computing Foundation will also a have booth at OSSEU. Get your pass to Open Source Summit Europe and stop by to learn more! Use discount OSSEULFM20 code for 20% off your all-access attendee pass.

Check out the full list of co-located events on the website and register now.

Reuben Paul, co-founder of CyberShaolin, will speak at Open Source Summit in Prague, highlighting the importance of cybersecurity awareness for kids.

Reuben Paul is not the only kid who plays video games, but his fascination with games and computers set him on a unique journey of curiosity that led to an early interest in cybersecurity education and advocacy and the creation of CyberShaolin, an organization that helps children understand the threat of cyberattacks. Paul, who is now 11 years old, will present a keynote talk at Open Source Summit in Prague, sharing his experiences and highlighting insecurities in toys, devices, and other technologies in daily use.

Reuben Paul, co-founder of CyberShaolin

We interviewed Paul to hear the story of his journey and to discuss CyberShaolin and its mission to educate, equip, and empower kids (and their parents) with knowledge of cybersecurity dangers and defenses.  

Linux.com: When did your fascination with computers start?
Reuben Paul: My fascination with computers started with video games. I like mobile phone games as well as console video games. When I was about 5 years old (I think), I was playing the “Asphalt” racing game by Gameloft on my phone. It was a simple but fun game. I had to touch on the right side of the phone to go fast and touch the left side of the phone to slow down. I asked my dad, “How does the game know where I touch?”

He researched and found out that the phone screen was an xy coordinate system and so he told me that if the x value was greater than half the width of the phone screen, then it was a touch on the right side. Otherwise, it was a touch on the left side. To help me better understand how this worked, he gave me the equation to graph a straight line, which was y = mx + b and asked, “Can you find the y value for each x value?” After about 30 minutes, I calculated the y value for each of the x values he gave me.

“When my dad realized that I was able to learn some fundamental logics of programming, he introduced me to Scratch and I wrote my first game called “Big Fish eats Small Fish” using the x and y values of the mouse pointer in the game. Then I just kept falling in love with computers.Paul, who is now 11 years old, will present a keynote talk at Open Source Summit in Prague, sharing his experiences and highlighting insecurities in toys, devices, and other technologies in daily use.

Linux.com: What got you interested in cybersecurity?
Paul: My dad, Mano Paul, used to train his business clients on cybersecurity. Whenever he worked from his home office, I would listen to his phone conversations. By the time I was 6 years old, I knew about things like the Internet, firewalls, and the cloud. When my dad realized I had the interest and the potential for learning, he started teaching me security topics like social engineering techniques, cloning websites, man-in-the-middle attack techniques, hacking mobile apps, and more. The first time I got a meterpreter shell from a test target machine, I felt like Peter Parker who had just discovered his Spiderman abilities.

Linux.com: How and why did you start CyberShaolin?
Paul: When I was 8 years old, I gave my first talk on “InfoSec from the mouth of babes (or an 8 year old)” in DerbyCon. It was in September of 2014. After that conference, I received several invitations and before the end of 2014, I had keynoted at three other conferences.

So, when kids started hearing me speak at these different conferences, they started writing to me and asking me to teach them. I told my parents that I wanted to teach other kids, and they asked me how. I said, “Maybe I can make some videos and publish them on channels like YouTube.” They asked me if I wanted to charge for my videos, and I said “No.” I want my videos to be free and accessible to any child anywhere in the world. This is how CyberShaolin was created.

Linux.com: What’s the goal of CyberShaolin?
Paul: CyberShaolin is the non-profit organization that my parents helped me found. Its mission is to educate, equip, and empower kids (and their parents) with knowledge of cybersecurity dangers and defenses, using videos and other training material that I develop in my spare time from school, along with kung fu, gymnastics, swimming, inline hockey, piano, and drums. I have published about a dozen videos so far on the www.CyberShaolin.org website and plan to develop more. I would also like to make games and comics to support security learning.

CyberShaolin comes from two words: Cyber and Shaolin. The word cyber is of course from technology. Shaolin comes from the kung fu martial art form in which my dad and are I are both second degree black belt holders. In kung fu, we have belts to show our progress of knowledge, and you can think of CyberShaolin like digital kung fu where kids can become Cyber Black Belts, after learning and taking tests on our website.

Linux.com: How important do you think is it for children to understand cybersecurity?
Paul: We are living in a time when technology and devices are not only in our homes but also in our schools and pretty much any place you go. The world is also getting very connected with the Internet of Things, which can easily become the Internet of Threats. Children are one of the main users of these technologies and devices.  Unfortunately, these devices and apps on these devices are not very secure and can cause serious problems to children and families. For example, I recently (in May 2017) demonstrated how I could hack into a smart toy teddy bear and turn it into a remote spying device.
Children are also the next generation. If they are not aware and trained in cybersecurity, then the future (our future) will not be very good. 

Linux.com: How does the project help children?
Paul:As I mentioned before, CyberShaolin’s mission is to educate, equip, and empower kids (and their parents) with knowledge of cybersecurity dangers and defenses.

As kids are educated about cybersecurity dangers like cyber bullying, man-in-the-middle, phishing, privacy, online threats, mobile threats, etc., they will be equipped with knowledge and skills, which will empower them to make cyber-wise decisions and stay safe and secure in cyberspace.
And, just as I would never use my kung fu skills to harm someone, I expect all CyberShaolin graduates to use their cyber kung fu skills to create a secure future, for the good of humanity.

At Open Source Summit in Prague, Giovanni Bechis will discuss tools that improve software security by blocking unwanted syscalls.

At the upcoming Open Source Summit Europe + ELC Europe 2017, to be held in Prague, Czech Republic, Giovanni Bechis will be delivering a talk focused on tools that help improve software security by blocking unwanted syscalls.  

Giovanni Bechis

Bechis is CEO and DevOps engineer at SNB s.r.l., a hosting provider and develops web applications based on Linux/BSD operating systems that is mainly focused on integrating web applications with legacy softwares. In this interview, Bechis explained more about his approach to software security.

Linux.com: What’s the focus of your talk?

Giovanni Bechis: The talk will focus on two similar solutions implemented in Linux and OpenBSD kernels, designed to prevent a program from calling syscalls they should not call to improve security of software.

In both kernels (Linux and OpenBSD), unwanted syscalls can be blocked and the offending program terminated, but there are some differences between Linux and OpenBSD’s solution of the problem.

During my talk, I will analyze the differences between two similar techniques that are present in Linux and OpenBSD kernels that are used to mitigate security bugs (that could be used to attack  software and escalate privileges on a machine).

Linux.com: Who should attend?

Bechis: The scope of the talk is to teach developers how they can develop better and more secure software by adding just few lines to their code. The target audience is mainly developers interested in securing applications.

Linux.com: Can you please explain both solutions and what problems they actually solve?

Bechis: The main problem that these solutions are trying to solve is that bugs can be exploited to let software do something that it is not designed to do. For example, with some crafty parameters or some crafty TCP/IP packet, it could be possible to let a program read a password file; it should not read or delete some files that it should not delete.

This is more dangerous if the program is running as root instead of a dedicated user because it will have access to all files of the machine if proper security techniques have not been applied.

With these solutions, if a program tries to do something it is not designed for, it will be killed by the kernel and the execution of the program will terminate.

To do that, the source code of the program should be modified with some “more or less” simple lines of code that will “describe” which system calls the program is allowed to request.

A system call is the programmatic way in which a computer program requests a service from the kernel of the operating system it is executed on, by allowing only a subset of the system calls we can mitigate security bugs.

Last year, for example, memcached, a popular application designed to speed up dynamic web applications, has suffered by a remote code execution bug that could be exploited to remotely run arbitrary code on the targeted system, thereby compromising the many websites that expose Memcache servers accessible over the Internet.

With a solution like seccomp(2) or pledge(2), a similar bug could be mitigated, the remote code would never be executed, and the memcached process would be terminated.

Linux.com: What’s the main difference between the two solutions?

Bechis: The main difference (at least the more visible one without viewing under the hood) between Linux and OpenBSD implementation is that, with Linux seccomp(2), you can instruct the program in a very granular way, and you can create very complex policies, while on OpenBSD pledge(2) permitted syscalls have been grouped so policies will be simpler.

On the other hand, using seccomp(2) in Linux could be difficult, while OpenBSD pledge(2) is far easier to use.

On both operating systems, every program should be studied in order to decide which system call the application could use, and there are some facilities that can help understand how a program is operating, what it is doing, and which operations it should be allowed to do.

Learn more at Open Source Summit, taking place in Prague, Czech Republic Oct. 23- 26. Register now!

At organizations of all types, launching and maintaining successful open source programs has become a business priority. A strong open source program office helps to ensure that open source is supported, nurtured, shared, explained, and leveraged. With such an office, organizations can establish and execute on their open source strategies in clear terms.

With all this in mind, The Linux Foundation and The TODO Group (Talk Openly Develop Openly) have published a free collection of detailed open source guides to aid companies developing open source programs. The guides are available to you now, and this is the first in a series of articles that can introduce you to the value of the guides.

How to Create an Open Source Program is the first of the guides, and it explores everything from the role of the open source program office to how successful open source programs at companies like Google function. The guide also includes insights and advice from open source experts, including John Mark Walker, Founder of the Open Source Entrepreneur Network, and Will Norris, Open Source Office Manager at Google.

“The open source program office is an essential part of any modern company with a reasonably ambitious plan to influence various sectors of software ecosystems,” notes Walker, in the guide. “If a company wants to increase its influence, clarify its open source messaging, maximize the clout of its projects, or increase the efficiency of its product development, a multifaceted approach to open source programs is essential.”

The How to Create an Open Source Program guide makes clear that there is not a one-size-fits-all approach to creating a successful program. In fact, Google’s Norris notes that stakeholders from individual business units play a key role in how open source projects advance at Google.

“We allow the various business units around the company to make the decision on whether it makes sense to open source a given project from a business perspective, because there’s a lot of different reasons why you might open source a project or a piece of code,” he notes. “We’re comfortable with allowing projects to take the approach that works for them given their goals. We play more of a role of facilitating and advising.”

The first guide lays out recommendations for how to include stakeholders ranging from Legal to Engineering in the maintenance of a program office. It also delves into the importance of setting clear program policies and observing compliance guidelines.

“Having a well-defined policy in place, that’s great, but it’s got to be a well-defined minimal policy,” said Jeff Mcaffer, director of the Open Source Programs Office at Microsoft, who was interviewed for the first guide. “Otherwise you get lawyers, security folks, business folks, all piling in their concerns and constraints. Soon you end up with a straitjacket full of policy that basically means that nobody can do anything.”

These free guides are extremely valuable for any organization setting up an open source program. Notably, the guides were not produced in a vacuum. Far from it. The advice you will find in them grew organically out of many interviews with some of the world’s leading open source experts. We strongly encourage you to check out the guides, and stay tuned to this space for more articles in this series.

This week in open source news, AGL reveals new infotainment platform, mainstream enterprises derive the most benefit from OSS, and more! Read on to stay on top of the latest open source news. 

1) Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) recently revealed the latest infotainment platform along with a new Virtualization Expert Group (EG-VIRT) to develop a virtualized architecture.

Linux Foundation Focuses on Bringing Virtualization to Your Car– RCRWireless News

2) “Combing through the last few quarters of earnings transcripts, it’s clear that open source has arrived…but to very different destinations, depending on the company.”

Open Source is Driving Digital Transformation, According to Mainstream Businesses– Tech Republic

3) Amazon Web Services joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), (open source home of the Kubernetes project,) as a Platinum Member.

AWS joins the Cloud Native Computing Foundation– TechCrunch

4) “On August 24 and 25, the Ubuntu Desktop team will be holding a “Fit and Finish Sprint,” where they will aggressively test GNOME.”

Canonical Needs Your Help Transitioning Ubuntu Linux From Unity to GNOME– BetaNews

5) The VoltaStream Zero (an open source integrated audio module in the same form as a Raspberry Pi Zero) has launched.

Raspberry Pi Zero Clone: This Open Source Board Offers Chromecast-Quality Sound– ZDNet

This week in OSS and Linux news, two opinion writers at The New York Times consider the safeguards of open source software in future elections, Prodip Sen of HP shares the growing role of OPNFV, and more! Read on to stay in the open source know this week. 

1) The National Association of Voting Officials is leading a movement to encourage officials to stop purchasing insecure systems and use open source software to “guard our votes against manipulation.”

To Protect Voting, Use Open-Source Software– New York Times

2) As NFV becomes more central in transitioning to 5G, so too does OPNFV.

OPNFV’s Role in NFV Testing and the Road to 5G– Telecom TV

3) Microsoft continues trend towards being more open with new CNCF Platinum membership.

Microsoft Expands Role In Cloud By Joining Cloud Native Computing Foundation– Forbes

4) Windows 10 users will be able to run an array of Linux software this Fall.

Windows 10 Will Let Everyone Run Linux Inside Windows Following Fall Creators Update– TechRepublic

5) The effort to save Adobe Flash continues.

GitHub Developer Starts Petition to Open Source Adobe Flash– Computer Business Review