Posts

Community growth and engagement, coupled with new member support, offers additional approaches for assessing safety in applications using Linux.

 

SAN FRANCISCO, June 18, 2020 – As ELISA (Enabling Linux in Safety Applications) nears its year and a half anniversary, the project continues to hit key milestones showing its value for delivering foundational support for safety-critical applications.   ELISA, formed in February 2019 and a hosted project of the Linux Foundation, aims to create a shared set of tools and processes to help companies build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications and systems whose failure could result in loss of human life, significant property damage, or environmental damage. 

As Linux continues to be a key component in safety applications, autonomous vehicles, medical devices, and even rockets, ELISA will make it easier for companies to build and expand these safety-critical systems. As a show of support for this business-critical initiative, several new members have joined the ELISA project. New members include Premier Member Intel/Mobileye, General Members ADIT, Elektrobit, Mentor, SiFive, Suzuki, Wind River and Associate Members Automotive Grade Linux and Technical University of Applied Sciences Regensburg. 

“Since forming ELISA, we’ve had incredible support from members and the community. As we near 18 months as a project, we’ve agreed on a strategy for partitioning the problem into manageable pieces, and have working groups making progress towards approaches to bridge between the linux and safety standards communities and are looking forward to continuing the path we’ve been on,” said Kate Stewart, Senior Director of Strategic Programs, The Linux Foundation. “We are encouraged by broad participation, as demonstrated by our nine new members, including Intel, as well as very active working groups. These kinds of activities are indicators of achieving the critical mass needed to establish a widely discussed and accepted methodology.”

“Intel and Mobileye see the Linux Operating system as an important player in the functional safety software ecosystem,” said Simone Fabris, ELISA Governing Board member and senior director of system safety at Mobileye, an Intel Company.  “The impact and skills of the open source community will be harnessed through the ELISA project to increase the safety integrity of future embedded systems while, at the same time, contributing to a better quality, reduction of development costs and speed up the delivery of complex functional safety systems across multiple industry domains including autonomous driving and avionics.”

“Linux has evolved ever since its inception to run on devices small and large while serving the needs of a wide spectrum of technology, from an elevator to a supercomputer,” said Shuah Khan, ELISA Technical Steering Committee Member and Linux Foundation Fellow. “Each of these evolutions requires identifying what is needed and what is missing in the existing code base and enhancing existing features and adding new ones. ELISA project’s mission is to evolve Linux to serve an emerging and important safety-critical space that spans medical devices, civil infrastructure, caregiving robots, automotives, and others.”

In addition to incredible member growth, ELISA has established several work groups to further the crucial work of the cross-industry project and its work toward advancing open source in safety-critical systems. These groups include Kernel Development Process,  Safety Architecture, Medical Devices and is now forming an Automotive working group.

Community members will have the chance to learn more about this important work during the Linux Foundation’s Open Source Summit North America where Kate Stewart, Senior Director of Strategic Programs, The Linux Foundation, is set to give a keynote speech, “Keynote: Open Source in Safety Critical Applications: The End Game.” For the first time, this event will also include an Open Source Dependability track. See the full schedule for Open Source Summit North America taking place virtually from June 29, 2020 to July 2, 2020.

In addition, ELISA will continue to hold regular workshops to discuss approaches to solving the missing pieces and better tooling. Listen to previous workshops and get notified of upcoming events at https://elisa.tech/news/.

New Member Quotes

ADIT, a joint venture of Robert Bosch GmbH and DENSO Corporation

“Having followed ELISA since May 2019 and having participated in all workshops so far, I am excited to see the recent increase of interest in the field of Automotive and Linux; the core competence of ADIT. The enthusiastic collaboration between functional safety participants combined with the recent excellent contributions from Linux experts are adding the value and momentum needed to enable Linux in safety applications and to make ELISA a success story”, said Philipp Ahmann, manager at ADIT, a joint venture of Robert Bosch GmbH and DENSO Corporation.

Automotive Grade Linux 

“Functional safety is an increasingly important topic for Automotive Grade Linux as we expand into Instrument Cluster and eventually into Autonomous Vehicle solutions”, said Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux at the Linux Foundation. “With the support of eleven car manufacturers and over 150 companies, we look forward to collaborating with ELISA Project and help drive the requirements from an automotive perspective.”

Elektrobit

“The research done in the ELISA project defines the future of enabling Linux for functional safety applications,” said Martin Schleicher, Executive Vice President Business Management, Elektrobit. “Vehicles are clearly products with special sensitivity.  EB is pleased to be part of this exciting project and looks forward to contributing its broad experience in automotive software and functional safety expertise to drive the development of mission critical automotive software.”

Mentor, a Siemens business

“The ELISA project enables Safety and Linux experts to work hand in hand on the future topics in using Linux in safety-related systems. Under the umbrella of the Linux Foundation the organizational frame allows constructive discussions about the main challenges for ‘making Linux safe,’” said Michael Ziganek, General Manager, Automotive Business Unit, Mentor, a Siemens business. “For us as Mentor, a Siemens business, being part of ELISA is an accelerator to have more customized technology offerings for our customers regarding our automotive software solutions, especially to integrate and maintain Linux in safety-critical systems.”

Technical University of Applied Sciences Regensburg

“After closely, but informally collaborating with the ELISA project via research, student and development projects, we are excited about joining ELISA as an associate member! Combining the industrial experience and insights of the world leaders in safety-critical Linux systems with the group’s research portfolio will bring marked benefits to both, industrial and academic communities, who are still too often at a distance from one another,” says Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Mauerer, head of the digitalization laboratory at OTH Regensburg.

Wind River

“Companies in all sectors will greatly benefit from the ELISA project’s goal of advancing open source to building and certifying Linux-based safety-critical applications and systems. When stakes are high and failure is not an option, it is vital for the ecosystem to work together to make safety a priority. Wind River has a long history in Linux and mission-critical systems and we look forward to contributing in order to help the ELISA project advance Linux for safety-critical applications,” said Gareth Noyes, senior vice president, Products, Wind River.

About ELISA

ELISA, Enabling Linux in Safety Applications, is an open source project hosted by the Linux Foundation. ELISA’s goal is to create a shared set of tools and processes to help companies build and certify Linux-based safety-critical applications and systems whose failure could result in loss of human life, significant property damage or environmental damage. Building off the work being done by SIL2LinuxMP project and Real-Time Linux project, ELISA will make it easier for companies to build safety-critical systems such as robotic devices, medical devices, smart factories, transportation systems and autonomous driving using Linux. Founding members of ELISA include Arm, BMW Car IT GmbH, KUKA, Linutronix, and Toyota.

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and industry adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

# # #

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Building a successful open source community

Why do you need program management as part of your open source project? We asked a few of the Linux Foundation’s program managers to tell us how they each approach the task.

How does coordination and facilitation help improve my project? 

We tend to think of the primary goals of the Linux Foundation’s projects as producing open software, open hardware, open standards, or open data artifacts — the domain of participating programmers & engineers, system architects, and other technical contributors. 

However, successful projects engaging a broader ecosystem of commercial organizations, particularly when raising funds, benefit from active leadership besides pure technical contributions. Contributors often have work outside the project that often puts demands on their time. It takes real time to build and coordinate a commercial ecosystem, ensure stakeholders are engaged, recruiting and onboarding members, create a neutral governance culture (often amid competitors competing), and to keep various aspects of the ecosystem aligned such as when end users begin to participate.

Many Linux Foundation projects fundraise to provide resources for their community. This is an excellent benefit for the technical community when the business ecosystem comes together to invest and help the community obtain resources to build a thriving community and ecosystem. A typical fundraising model in our community is to offer an annual membership structure that provides a yearly fund for the project. 

The Linux Foundation’s approach to governance separates decisions about funds and business affairs from the technical project’s governance. The companies contributing money to a project’s fund can decide how those funds are spent and any related business decisions. The technical community can operate independently with open source best practices and continue to make decisions about what code to accept, how to build releases, etc. based on the technical merit of decisions in front of them and not based on what companies contributed funding.

We will always have representation from the technical community involved in the budget and business decisions to ensure funding decisions are well informed. This is how the Linux Foundation model preserves the development best practices of open source while enabling a community to benefit from the commercial ecosystem dependent on their work.

Guidance for your community

Within a technical project, there are roles for organizing how releases are built. Often some committers decide which code is accepted, and maintainers decide what to put into a release.  When scaling the project to create an ecosystem around it, there are other key roles and responsibilities that a project needs to stay on track and to continue to scale. These functions include:

    • Planning and Building.  Building a cohesive strategy is critical to the success of a project and requires investments in outcomes the core stakeholders want to see happen, and prioritize
    • Measuring KPIs. Tracking a project’s mission, goals, and objectives while moving those through the swim lanes is key to iterating on things that work and addressing things that don’t.
    • Facilitating. To be successful at facilitating, a coordinator must understand the landscape, and remain neutral. This can be difficult and is often the most challenging part of the job, NOT weighing in unless asked. 
    • Advising. Coordinators are a sounding board for these things with some expertise. To mature an organization, you must craft mechanisms for self-governance and sustainability.
    • Iterating and Reflecting. What happens along the way is that stakeholders in the community want to get things done — but when that happens without reflection, you lose sight of what and where you’re going. It’s essential to see the forest AND the trees, especially from an above-the-canopy view.

In the past, we have had a few communities with respected, neutral leaders who have provided these roles. The Xen Project is one example of a member of the community who has offered to perform this role for many years. There is a significant time investment from the community’s leadership to make it work, which is an excellent benefit for the community to have someone able and willing to spend their work time on this function. 

Many other projects are not able to find someone in the community to help. This is often where the Linux Foundation builds a support program to assist the projects we host that need help to obtain neutral coordination and facilitation professionals. We call the people who provide this support Program Manager (PM). PMs are often the first point of contact for community participants and potential members, and are usually involved in the following activities:

    • Program Managers help the governing and technical boards shape the project’s directions and goals. 
    • Program Managers will work with a project’s technical leadership to understand their technical goals. 
    • They work with the members to fill positions such as Chair and Treasurer and are involved with the voting process.
    • They ensure that both the governing and technical boards act within the agreed-upon guidelines of the project’s charter. 
    • They help onboard new members into the project community. 
    • They will engage resources from the Foundation’s Marketing, PR, Events, and Training teams to coordinate the support programs delivered for a project.  
    • Program Managers also oversee the delivery of other support programs provided by the Foundation and any services provided by vendors or contractors.
    • Program managers will pull in the Foundation’s IT service team members for a consultative discussion on the right development infrastructure, tools, and managed IT support programs based on the project community’s needs and roadmap. 
    • Program managers actively engage in community management and help the project’s leaders coordinate meetups, developer hackfests, and participation at events.

Setting strategic goals for your community

Identifying and articulating a project’s mission is essential with an open source project as it is with any business activity. Setting concrete goals enables the participants in a project to discuss and align around a single narrative that can guide their activities and inform decisions. 

Program Managers work with the project’s membership and technical leadership to define a strategy with goals, milestones, and metrics for the project. They coordinate discussions to assist the governing board in coming to a consensus on a budget that supports the technical community’s needs and aligns with the project strategy. 

For open source, very often, the goals include maximizing a project’s footprint in order to help the most people. Goals are often articulated to a fine granular level — enabling contributors to engage more easily, growing the membership from a particular sector of the ecosystem, or increase contributions from end users. 

The CHAOSS project is a community focused on defining community metrics around engagement, risks, etc. that are often helpful to project leaders in setting and establishing goals for measurably improving their ecosystem. 

Implementing a project lifecycle for your community

Open source projects often have subprojects and various efforts to innovate on new ideas that may not be ready to be included in an official release or as their independent release. We often refer to these communities as using an “umbrella” model with several coordinated sub-projects within the community. Within an umbrella community, the projects will typically follow a lifecycle. The lifecycle generally follows a path from imagination to planning to initial execution, expansion, and eventually maintenance and eventual retirement. 

Program managers often work with the technical leadership to codify this lifecycle according to milestones so that participants in the project can immediately understand where a project stands in terms of maturity and resources. CNCF, for example, has project phases that include Sandbox, Incubation, and Graduation. OpenJS Foundation has project phases that include Incubation, At-Large, Growth, Impact, and Emeritus, which map to the needs of their community.

A project lifecycle is an essential tool for a foundation to signal the maturity of multiple projects and identify for the community what the path towards a fully mature project requires. It is both a pathway and a signal, noting that projects grow and change, and what the community thinks a project should rely on to guide itself. 

In most projects, there is an entry-level, a mid-level, and a graduate level. The entry-level projects indicate a promising start for an emerging project and something to be considered. Mid Level projects show growth and development for an audience that might consider using this project, and graduated projects indicate full maturity and a project that many in the ecosystem rely upon.

“Within the Cloud Native Computing Foundation, the various project stages have been beneficial for encouraging projects to grow, not only from a development standpoint but from a community standpoint. A project looking to graduate has to demonstrate both a strong codebase and a strong community.”

Amye Scavarda Perrin, CNCF Program Manager

Linux Foundation Networking (LFN) Program Manager Trishan De Lanerolle notes how the Technical Advisory Council plays an active role in a project’s lifecycle management:

“Linux Foundation Networking project (LFN) technical leadership (Technical Advisory Council) developed and published a model that lays out criteria and checkpoints for projects in various stages of maturity, including an LFN Entry review and evaluation for new candidate projects to the LFN umbrella. The entry process provides a mechanism to amicably and fairly assess upcoming projects. In LFN, that entails asking whether a proposed project: falls within the LFN scope, provides a snapshot into the status or health of the community, and ensures the project’s documented governance is clear, complete, and easily accessible.”

Through facilitating the work of the Strategy Subcommittee, whose primary goal is to assist the Governing Board with developing and implementing Continuous Delivery Foundation (CDF) strategic planning, Program Manager Dan Lopez was able to guide CDF toward sustainable, long-lasting strategic goals. 

“The immense value of a Program Manager lies in their ability to foster a space for progress to happen. It’s not their role to necessarily make the tough decisions, but rather be the ‘glue’ of a program, ask the tough questions, and spark inspiration and critical thinking within their stakeholder group to create, in this case, sustainable goals that will create long term value for the CDF,”

Dan was able to approach strategic planning, as a neutral party who understood the landscape of the CDF, and assist the Governing Board in creating well-aligned goals that mapped to key performance indicators that can be measured and managed over time. 

The importance of open governance in your community

The Program Manager is also a vital member of the leadership team, working collaboratively to facilitate and operationalize the wants, needs, and priorities of the governing bodies. Each Linux Foundation Program Manager works with each project community to establish a transparent, open governance model for the technical community.

In open governance, a project is managed by a group of people representing the stakeholders in a project — generally project members and leaders of the project’s technical efforts. The concept of conducting a major technical effort using an open form of governance, in which all stakeholders’ needs must be addressed, and people are required to cooperate to get work done, is founded on the basic concept of democracy. It differs from closed or proprietary governance due to the transparency and coordination required to reach consensus.

Open governance provides a balance that can never be found in a proprietary, restrictive environment — the dynamics of that activity drive creativity and innovation, and significantly increase the speed of development. Program managers and community managers often guide these processes and help keep governance bodies on track with each other.

DPDK’s Program Manager Trishan de Lanerolle discusses how his project is divided into two bodies of equal responsibility:

“DPDK is one model of open governance, with co-equal governing bodies; the Governing Board has ownership and oversight, over budget, marketing, lab resources, administrative, legal, and licensing issues, and a Technical Board with ownership and oversight on technical issues including approval of new sub-projects, deprecating old sub-projects, the project’s technical roadmap, recruiting maintainers, defining the processes for contributing, testing, and managing security. The Technical Board comprises individuals from various organizations, that are not necessarily corporate members of the project, recognized for their technical contributions. The governing board comprises representatives from member organizations, who financially support the project, working hand in hand to make the project mission a reality.” 

Other projects, such as LF Energy, take a somewhat different path towards how their governance is structured. 

LF Energy represents an example of open, representative governance within a rapidly growing open source foundation. LF Energy has a board of directors, like most foundations, made up of Premier members, and includes a representative from the General members and a representative from the Technical Advisory Council (TAC), which is made up of technical project leaders. No single company has more than one representative on the board, which provides corporate as well as cultural diversity and voices from all over the industry, not just focused on one niche. 

The Linux Foundation’s neutral program management support program can help

Active program management and program management support is one of the main reasons why open source projects join an organization like the Linux Foundation. Our program management professionals provide a unique set of operational skills and capabilities that nearly all of our projects take advantage of — which is to offload operational and facilitation work from the community. 

In summary, a successful project should have community coordination and program managers that can plan and build, that can measure a project’s performance, that can act as prime facilitators and advise, and can help project stakeholders iterate and reflect to learn from their experiences in order to move a project forward.

“Managing Open source projects can be compared to nurturing a young sapling as it grows into a mature, healthy tree — or in this case, a community. Our job is to supply it with the right balance of nutrients and conditions for successful growth. Following proven governance models with strategic program management, helps increase the odds of nurturing a healthy community. Program Managers help clear the path, allowing communities to focus on the code and achieving technical goals. We are horticulturalists, toiling away in the background, and if we are doing our job correctly, you shouldn’t notice us.” 

Trishan de Lanerolle, Technical Program Manager & Community Architect, LF Networking

GCC

As the default compiler for the Linux kernel source, GCC delivers trusted, stable performance and also builds system libraries and many of the applications in popular Linux distributions.

Software is useless if computers can’t run it. The GNU Compiler Collection (GCC) is the unsung hero of the software world, transforming high level source code into low level object code while shielding the developer from hardware dependencies. With over 30 years of continual use and development, GCC offers a robust and stable foundation for building complete systems – from the kernel upwards.  It is not surprising that GCC is still considered by LLVM.org to be “the de facto-standard open source compiler today.”

Who uses GCC?

As the default compiler for the Linux kernel source, GCC delivers trusted, stable performance and also builds system libraries and many of the applications in popular Linux distributions. GCC is also one of the most widely adopted core compilers by developers of embedded systems, with many GCC-based prebuilt toolchains enabling the software for the growing world of IoT devices. Application developers writing code for a variety of new and legacy computing environments depend on GCC since it delivers trusted performance along with support for the broadest range of hardware and operating environments.   

And why do these folks depend on GCC? With decades of development by thousands of people GCC is one of the most respected compilers in the world. It functions as a cross compiler, creating executable code for a platform other than the one on which the compiler is running. GCC is also a core component of the tightly integrated GNU toolchain, produced by the GNU Project, that includes glibc, Binutils, and the GNU Debugger (GDB). GCC delivers improved diagnostics for compile time debugging, accurate and useful information for runtime debugging, and is a well supported platform with an active, committed community that supports the current and two previous releases.

Learn more

If you are building software and not using GCC, you are missing out on the best possible solution. Check out the article “GCC: Optimizing Linux, the Internet, and Everything” to get a more comprehensive look at this amazing software tool.

Margaret Lewis is a technology consultant who previously served as Director of Software Planning at AMD and an Associate Director at the Maui High Performance Computing Center.

open source event

Don’t miss Open Source Summit & ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe, October 22 – 24 in Edinburgh.

See why you need to be at Open Source Summit Europe and Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit Europe next month! Hurry — space is going quickly. Secure your spot and register by September 22 to save $150.

Here are the Top 10 Reasons you’ll want to be at this event:

  1. Timely Cutting-edge Content: 300+ sessions on Linux development, embedded Linux systems, IoT, cloud native development, cloud infrastructure, AI, blockchain and open source program management & community leadership.
  2. Deep Dive Labs & Tutorials: An Introduction to Linux Control Groups (cgroups),  Building Kubernetes Native Apps with the Operator Framework, Resilient and Fast Persistent Container Storage Leveraging Linux’s Storage Functionalities,  and 10 Years of Linux Containers, are just some of the labs and tutorials included in one low registration price.
  3. 12 Co-located Events*: Come for OSS & ELC + OpenIoT Summit and stay for LF Energy Summit, Linux Security Summit, Cloud & Container Embedded Apprentice Linux Engineer tutorials, IoT Apprentice Linux Engineer tutorials, Hyperledger Scotland Meetup, Linux in Safety-Critical Systems Summit, and many more co-located events.  (*Some co-located events may require an additional registration fee.)
  4. Discover New Projects & Technologies: Over 30 sponsors will be showcasing new projects and technologies in the Sponsor Showcase throughout the event, joined by our Technical Showcase at the Onsite Attendee reception showcasing Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) projects from system developers and hardware makers.
  5. Social Activities & Evening Events: Take a break and go on a sightseeing bus tour, join the 5K fun run or morning meditation, and meet with fellow attendees through the networking app. Collaborate with fellow attendees at the attendee reception at the National Museum of Scotland and at the Onsite Attendee Reception & Sponsor + Technical Showcase.
  6. Diversity Empowerment Summit: Explore ways to advance diversity and inclusion in the community and across the technology industry.
  7. Women in Open Source Lunch &  Better Together Diversity Social: Women and non-binary members of the open source community are invited to network with each other at the lunch sponsored by Adobe, while all underrepresented minorities are welcome to attend the at the Better Together Diversity Social.
  8. Developer & Hallway Track Lounge: The highlight for many at this event is the ability to collaborate with the open source community. This dedicated lounge offers a space for developers to hack and collaborate throughout the event as well as plenty of seating for hallway track discussions.
  9. Networking Opportunities: Attend the Speed Networking & Mentoring event, OS Career Mixer, or use the networking app to expand your open source community connections by finding and meeting with attendees with similar interests.
  10. Hear from the Leading Technologists in Open Source: Keynote talks include a Linux Kernel update, a fireside chat with Linus Torvalds & Dirk Hohndel, a look at the future of AI and Deep Learning, a panel discussion on the future of energy with open source, a discussion on diversity & inclusion, a talk on the parallels between open source & video games, and insightful talks on how open source is changing banking, human rights and scientific collaboration

Sign up to receive updates on Open Source Summit Europe: 

VIEW THE FULL SCHEDULE »

REGISTER NOW »

The Linux Foundation’s Jim Zemlin welcomes attendees to Open Source Summit in Vancouver.

The Linux Foundation’s job is to create engines of innovation and enable the gears of those engines to spin faster, said Executive Director Jim Zemlin, in opening remarks at Open Source Summit in Vancouver.

Examples of how the organization is driving innovation across industries can be seen in projects such as Let’s Encrypt, a free, automated certificate authority working to encrypt the entire web, Automotive Grade Linux, Hyperledger, and the new Academy Software Foundation, which is focused on open collaboration within the motion picture industry.

This is open source beyond Linux and, according to Zemlin, is indicative of one of the best years and most robust periods at The Linux Foundation itself. So far in 2018, the organization has added a new member every single day, with Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), one of The Linux Foundation’s fastest growing projects, announcing 38 new members this week.

Successful projects depend on members, developers, standards, and infrastructure to develop products that the market will adopt, said Zemlin, and The Linux Foundation facilitates this success in many ways. It works downstream helping industry, government, and academia understand how to consume and contribute to open source. At the same time, it works upstream to foster development and adoption of open source solutions, showing industries how to create value and generate reinvestment.

During his keynote, Zemlin spoke with Sarah Novotny, Open Source Strategy Lead at Google Cloud, about Google’s support of open source development. In the talk, Novotny announced that Google Cloud is transferring ownership and management of the Kubernetes project’s cloud resources to CNCF community contributors and is additionally granting $9 million over three years to CNCF to cover infrastructure costs associated with Kubernetes development and distribution. Novotny, who noted that the project is actively seeking new contributors, said this commitment will provide the opportunity for more people to get involved.

In the words of Zemlin, let’s go solve big problems, one person, one project, one industry at a time.

keynotes

Check out the first round of keynotes for Open Source Summit and ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe, coming up October 22-24 in Edinburgh.

Announcing the first round of keynote speakers for Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit Europe!

Keynotes include:

  • Patrick Ball, Director of Research, Human Rights Data Analysis Group
  • Eric Berlow, Co-Founder, Chief Science Officer, Vibrant Data Inc.
  • Linus Torvalds, Creator of Linux & Git, in conversation with Dirk Hohndel, Vice President & Chief Open Source Officer, VMware
  • Ed Cable, President & Chief Executive Officer, Mifos Initiative
  • Jonathan Corbet, Author, Kernel Developer and Executive Editor, LWN.net
  • Johanna Koester, Program Director of Developer Technology and Advocacy, IBM
  • Dr. Alexander Nitz, Gravitational-wave Researcher, Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics
  • Brenda Romero, Award-Winning Game Designer, Fulbright Scholar & Entrepreneur
  • Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation

The conference schedule will be released on August 14, with additional keynote announcements to follow.

Open Source Summit is THE leading conference for developers, architects and other technologists – as well as open source community and industry leaders – to collaborate and learn about the latest technologies and gain a competitive advantage by using innovative open solutions. Join us for 200+ sessions and co-located events including Linux Security Summit, Zephyr Hackathon – “Get Connected,” LF Energy Summit, and Tracing Summit.

Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) is the premier technical conference for companies and developers using Linux in embedded products. The conference gathers user-space developers, product vendors, kernel, and systems developers to collaborate.

OpenIoT Summit is the technical conference for the developers and architects working on industrial IoT. It provides the technical knowledge needed to deliver smart connected products and solutions that take advantage of the rapid evolution of IoT technologies. It is the only IoT event focused on the development of open IoT solutions.

Sign up to receive updates on Open Source Summit Europe + OpenIoT Summit: 

Registration includes access to all three events!

Secure your spot and register now to save $300! The early bird registration deadline ends August 18.

REGISTER NOW »

Need help convincing your manager? Here’s a letter that can help you make the request to attend Open Source Summit & ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe.

Applications for diversity and needs-based scholarships are also being accepted. Get information on eligibility and how to apply. Free childcare is also available for attendees.

Check out the co-located events at Open Source Summit, including Kubernetes training & more!

What makes attending Open Source Summit so valuable?

The people who attend, and the sharing of information that transpires when 2,000 open source leaders from around the globe gather to work together to transform technology.

In addition to education opportunities stemming from 250+ conference sessions and a plethora of collaboration opportunities in the hallway track and at networking events, Open Source Summit (previously LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen) offers added learning opportunities with a variety of co-located events: 11 this year to be exact.

The cost of travel can be the biggest hardship of attending an event, so you should make the most of it. Open Source Summit offers a number of ways to gain additional value from your trip.

This year’s co-located events and special events offerings include:

Co-Located Events

Linux Security Summit North America

Monday, August 27- Tuesday, August 28*

The Linux Security Summit is a technical forum for collaboration between Linux developers, researchers, and end users. Its primary aim is to foster community efforts in analyzing and solving Linux security challenges.

mountpoint 2018

Monday, August 27- Tuesday, August 28*

mountpoint 2018 unites the Ceph and Gluster communities, SDS experts, and partners to bring you an exciting two-day event.

LF Deep Learning Workshop

Tuesday, August 28*

Learn more about how the Linux Foundation’s Deep Learning Foundation is supporting open source innovation in Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and Deep Learning.

CHAOSScon North America

Tuesday, August 28*

This conference will show CHAOSS updates, use cases, and hands-on workshops for developers, community managers, project managers, and anyone interested in measuring open source project health.

Cloud-Native Network Functions (CNF) Seminar

Tuesday, August 28*

Two of the fastest-growing Linux Foundation projects – ONAP (part of LF Networking) and Kubernetes (part of CNCF) – are coming together in the next generation telecom architecture. This interactive seminar will be co-moderated by LF Networking GM Arpit Joshipura and Cloud Native Computing Foundation Executive Director Dan Kohn.

Egeria Open Metadata & Governance Workshop

Tuesday, August 28*

Learn more about Egeria, a new project from the ODPi that supports the free flow of metadata between different technologies.

OpenAPI Workshop

Tuesday, August 28*

Participate in this hands-on workshop to learn what OpenAPI is, who is using it, what you can do with it, as well as hands-on training on its advanced features, and a preview of the anticipated September 2018 release.

OpenChain Mini Summit

Tuesday, August 28*

The workshop will feature new compliance reference material, new training material, new case studies, interactive panels, and plenty of networking.

OpenHPC Workshop

Tuesday, August 28*

Participants will get a hands-on experience installing a bare metal instance of OpenHPC on clustered Intel NUCs to see how easy it is to get started.

LFCS & Linux on Azure Training Courses

Wednesday, August 29 – Thursday, August 30*

Presented by ITGilde and The Linux Foundation.

Cloud & Container Apprentice Linux Engineer Tutorials

Wednesday, August 29 – Friday, August 31

Event Experiences:

Lightning Talks

Tuesday, August 28

Better Together Diversity Social

Tuesday, August 28*

Vancouver Sightseeing Bus Tour

Wednesday, August 29*

First-time Attendee Breakfast

Wednesday, August 29

Open Source Career Mixer

Wednesday, August 29*

Women in Open Source Lunch

Wednesday, August 29*

All-Attendee Opening Reception at Vancouver Aquarium

Wednesday, August 29

Meet & Eat

Wednesday, August 29 – Friday, August 31*

Diversity Empowerment Summit

Wednesday, August 29 – Friday, August 31

Open Collaboration Conference

Wednesday, August 29 – Friday, August 31

5K Fun Run

Thursday, August 30*

Speed Mentoring & Networking

Thursday, August 30*

Onsite Attendee Reception & Sponsor Showcase

Thursday, August 30

Invitation Only Partner Reception

Thursday, August 30

Morning Meditation

Friday, August 31*

Kids Day

Friday, August 31*

Puppy Pawlooza

Friday, August 31

*Limited availability and/or requires pre-registration

Sign up to receive updates on Open Source Summit: 

Need help convincing your boss? Here’s a letter that you can use that will help seal the deal.

If you haven’t yet registered for Open Source Summit, time is running out.

Interested in the hallway conversations, keynote sessions, and sponsor showcase? Grab the Hall Pass for only $150!

Register now to secure your spot.

REGISTER NOW »

Meet with fellow attendees at Open Source Summit!

Join the LF Events Slack.

Open Source Summit

Open Source Summit is THE place to learn about latest open source trends and technologies. Register now!

Open Source Summit North America is right around the corner. There will be hundreds of sessions, workshops, and talks, all curated by experts in the Linux and open source communities. It’s not an easy feat to choose the topics and sessions you want to attend at the event  because there are so many topics and only so much time.

In this article, we talk with Laura Abbott, a developer employed by Red Hat, and Bryan Liles, a developer at Heptio, a Kubernetes company, based in Seattle, Washington, about the upcoming event. Abbott is on the program committee for Open Source Summit, and Liles is one of the program chairs, working hard “to build out a schedule that touches on many aspects of Open Source.”

Hot topics

“I’ve been interested in cloud-native applications for a few years now, and I spend most of my time thinking about the problems and developing software in this space,” said Liles. “I’m also interested in computer vision, augmented reality, and virtual reality. One of the most important topics in this space right now is Machine Learning. It’s amazing to see all the open source solutions being created. I feel that even as a hobbyist, I can find tools to help me build and run models without causing me to go into debt. Personally, I’m looking forward to the talks in the Infrastructure & Automation and the Kubernetes/Containers/Cloud Native Apps tracks.”

Here are just a few of the must-see cloud computing sessions:

As a kernel developer, Abbott gets excited when people talk about their future kernel work, especially when it involves the internals like the page cache or memory management. “I also love to see topics that talk about getting people involved in projects for the first time,” she said. “I’m also excited to see the Diversity Empowerment Summit and learning from the speakers there.”

You may wonder as we are moving toward the cloud native world, where everything is running in a cloud, does Linux even matter anymore? But, the fact is Linux is powering the cloud.

“Linux is what’s powering all those topics. When people say Linux. they’re usually referring to the complete platform from kernel to userspace libraries. You need a solid base to be able to run your application in the cloud. The entire community of Linux contributors enables today’s developers to work with the latest technologies,” said Abbott.

A few of the featured talks in the Linux Systems and Development track include:

Latest Trends

“DevOps is unsurprisingly a hot topic,” said Abbott. “There is a lot of focus on how to move towards newer best practices with projects like Kubernetes and how to best monitor your infrastructure. Blockchain technologies are a very hot topic. Some of this work is very forward looking but there’s a lot of interest in figuring out if blockchain can solve existing problems,” said Abbott.

That means OSSNA is the place to be if you are interested in emerging trends and technologies. “If you are looking to see what is coming next, or currently involved in Open Source, you should attend,” says Liles. “The venue is in a great location in Vancouver, so you can also take in the city between listening to your peers during talks or debating current trends during the hallway track,” said Liles.

Abbott concluded, “Anyone who is excited about Linux should attend. There’s people talking about such a wide variety of topics from kernel development to people management. There’s something for everyone.”

Sign up to receive updates on Open Source Summit North America:

Linus Torvalds

Van Jones & Linus Torvalds to keynote at Open Source Summit North America in Vancouver.

We’ve announced additional keynotes at Open Source Summit North America, including:

  • Van Jones, President & Founder of the nonprofit, Dream Corps; CNN Contributor; Best-Selling Author; Human Rights, Education and Clean Energy Advocate
  • Austen Collins, Founder & CEO, Serverless Inc.
  • Linus Torvalds, creator of Linux and Git, in conversation with Dirk Hohndel, VP & Chief Open Source Officer, VMware

View the Full Schedule >>

Sign up to receive updates on Open Source Summit North America:

The event also features the Open Collaboration Conference where ecosystem leaders learn to navigate open source transformation with sessions covering compliance, community leadership and open source program office management in the new TODO track. The Diversity Empowerment Summit is also featured, which highlights the ways in which the community can benefit from expanding diversity and inclusion practices.

Register now to save $150 through July 21.

Register Now >>

Hall passes are also available for $150. Learn more >>

Need help convincing your manager? Here’s a letter that can help you make the request to attend Open Source Summit North America.

Linux Foundation members and LF project members receive an additional 20% discount off current registration pricing, and academic, student, non-profit, community, and group discounts are available as well. Email events@linuxfoundation.org to receive your discount code.

Applications for diversity and needs-based scholarships are also being accepted. Get information on eligibility and how to apply. Free childcare is also available for attendees.

LC3

Only 4 days until LinuxCon+ContainerCon+CloudOpen China. Register now!

It’s not too late to attend LinuxCon+ContainerCon+CloudOpen (LC3) China. See who’s attending!

Here’s what you can look forward to next week:

  1. Visionary Keynote Speakers: Junjie Cai, Alibaba Cloud; Anni Lai, Huawei; Haifeng Liu, JD.com; Todd Moore, IBM; Michelle Noorali, Microsoft; Dr. Zhexuan Song, Huawei; Linus Torvalds, Creator of Linux and Git; Liu Xin, Tencent; and more.
  2. Additional Learning Opportunities with Co-Located Events: Attend the DPDK Summit, OpenChain Workshop, Arm Innovator Asia Tour, Tencent Workshop Series, Apache ServiceComb (incubating) Day, and the FD.io DMM Seminar.
  3. 175 Sessions Across Three Days: Learn the latest developments and best practices in Linux Systems, Cloud Native Applications, Blockchain, AI, Networking, Cloud Infrastructure, and Open Source Leadership.
  4. Open Office Hours: Get 1:1 time with open source experts from AWS, ChainNova, China Mobile, Huawei, Microsoft, Red Hat, and more.

REGISTER NOW >>

Need assistance convincing your manager? Here’s a letter that can help you make the request to attend LC3.

Linux Foundation members and LF project members receive a 20% discount on registration pricing. Academic, student, non-profit and group discounts are also available. Email events@linuxfoundation.org to receive your discount code.

Sign up to receive updates on LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen China:

现在报名LinuxCon+ContainerCon+CloudOpen

(LC3)还为时未晚。浏览参会人员!

  1. 主题演讲嘉宾: Junjie Cai,阿里巴巴云; Anni Lai,华为;Haifeng Liu,JD.com;Todd Moore,IBM;Michelle Noorali,微软;Zhexuan Song博士,华为;Linus Torvalds,Linux和Git创办人;Liu Xin,腾讯;以及更多。
  2. 同场活动的额外学习机会: 参加DPDK中国峰会、OpenChain 研讨会、Arm亚洲创新路演、腾讯研讨会系列和华为云Apache ServiceComb 孵化日,以及FD.io DMM研讨会。
  3. 三天的175个会议: 了解Linux系统、云原生应用、区块链、人工智慧、网络、云架构和开源领导力等。
  4. 开放的额外交流时段与AWS、智链、中国移动、华为、微软、红帽云及更多开源专家预约1对1交流时间

立即注册>>

需要我们帮助您说服您的经理?这是一封可以帮助您提出 LC3 参会申请的信函Linux基金会成员LF项目成员注册费可享八折优惠。学者、学生、非盈利组织及团体皆享有优惠。发电邮至 events@linuxfoundation.org取得优惠码。