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2018 OS Jobs Report

The latest Open Source Jobs Report shows a strong market for open source talent, driven in part by the rapid growth of cloud technologies.

Linux expertise is again in the top spot as the most sought after open source skill, says the latest Open Source Jobs Report from Dice and The Linux Foundation. The seventh annual report shows rapidly growing demand for open source skills, particularly in areas of cloud technology.

Key findings of the report include:

  • Linux tops the list as the most in-demand open source skill, making it mandatory for most entry-level open source careers. This is due in part to the growth of cloud and container technologies, as well as DevOps practices, all of which are typically built on Linux.
  • Container technology is rapidly growing in popularity and importance, with 57% of hiring managers seeking those skills, up from 27% last year.
  • Hiring open source talent is a priority for 83% of hiring managers, up from 76% in 2017.
  • Hiring managers are increasingly opting to train existing employees on new open source technologies and help them gain certifications.
  • Many organizations are getting involved in open source with the express purpose of attracting developers.

Career Building

In terms of job seeking and job hiring, the report shows high demand for open source skills and a strong career benefit from open source experience.

  • 87% of open source professionals say knowing open source has advanced their career.
  • 87% of hiring managers experience difficulties in recruiting open source talent.

Hiring managers say they are specifically looking to recruit in the following areas:

OS Jobs skillsDiversity

This year’s survey included optional questions about companies’ initiatives to increase diversity in open source hiring, which has become a hot topic throughout the tech industry. The responses showed a significant difference between the views of hiring managers and those of open source pros — with only 52% of employees seeing those diversity efforts as effective compared with 70% of employers.

Overall, the 2018 Open Source Jobs Report indicates a strong market for open source talent, driven in part by the growth of cloud-based technologies. This market provides a wealth of opportunities for professionals with open source skills, as companies increasingly recognize the value of open source.

The 2018 Open Source Jobs Survey and Report, sponsored by Dice and The Linux Foundation, provides an overview of the latest trends for open source careers. Download the complete Open Source Jobs Report now.

Open Source Summit

Check out the full schedule for Open Source Summit North America (OSSNA).

Join us August 29-31, in Vancouver, BC, for 250+ sessions covering a wide array of topics including Linux Systems, Cloud Native Applications, Blockchain, AI, Networking, Cloud Infrastructure, Open Source Leadership, Program Office Management and more. Arrive early for new bonus content on August 28 including co-located events, tutorials, labs, workshops, and lightning talks.

VIEW THE FULL SCHEDULE »


More than 2,000 developers, sysadmins, DevOps professionals, and software architects, along with community and business leaders, will convene at Open Source Summit to collaborate, on and learn about, emerging and critical open source technologies.

Plus, Open Source Summit features a plethora of experiences and opportunities to make connections, including: our new First-Time Attendees Breakfast; morning activities like our 5k Run and meditation; evening events including the all-attendee reception at the Vancouver Aquarium; diversity events such as our inaugural Diversity in Open Source Reception and the Women in Open Source lunch; our new networking app; and much more.

Register to save $300 through June 17.

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deep learning

The LF Deep Learning Foundation is now accepting proposals for the contribution of projects.

I am very pleased to announce that the LF Deep Learning Foundation has approved a project lifecycle and contribution process to enable the contribution, support and growth of artificial intelligence, machine learning and deep learning open source projects. With these documents in place, the LF Deep Learning Foundation is now accepting proposals for the contribution of projects.

The LF Deep Learning Foundation, a community umbrella project of The Linux Foundation with the mission of supporting artificial intelligence, machine learning and deep learning open source projects, is working to build a self-sustaining ecosystem of projects.  Having a clear roadmap for how to contribute projects is a first step. Contributed projects operate under their own technical governance with collaboration resources allocated and provided by the LF Deep Learning Foundation’s Governing Board. Membership in the LF Deep Learning Foundation is not required to propose a project contribution.

The project lifecycle and contribution process documents can be found here: https://lists.deeplearningfoundation.org/g/tac-general/wiki/Lifecycle-Document-and-Project-Proposal-Process. Note that sign-up to the general LF Deep Learning Foundation mailing list is required to access these materials.

If you are interested in contributing a project, please review the steps and requirements described in the above materials. We are very excited to see what kinds of innovative, forward-thinking projects the community creates.

If you have any questions on how to contribute a project or the types of support LF Deep Learning Foundation is providing to its projects, please reach out to me at snicholas@linuxfoundation.org.

For more information on the LF Deep Learning Foundation, please visit https://www.linuxfoundation.org/projects/deep-learning/.

Share your expertise! Submit your proposal to speak at ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe by July 1.

For the past 13 years, Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) has been the premier vendor-neutral technical conference for companies and developers using Linux in embedded products. ELC has become the preeminent space for product vendors as well as kernel and systems developers to collaborate with user-space developers – the people building applications on embedded Linux.

OpenIoT Summit joins the technical experts paving the way for the new industrial transformation, industry 4.0, along with those looking to develop the skills needed to succeed, for education, collaboration, and deep dive learning opportunities. Share your expertise and present the information needed to lead successful IoT developments, progress the development of IoT solutions, use Linux in IoT, devices, and Automotive, and more.

View Full List of Suggested Topics and Submit Now >>

Get Inspired!

Watch presentations from  ELC Europe 2017

View All ELC Europe 2017 Keynotes »

Join us at Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit Europe in Edinburgh, UK on October 22-24, 2018. Sign up to receive conference updates.

OS Summit

Register now for Open Source Summit NA and save $300 through June 17.

Join us in Vancouver in August for 250+ educational sessions covering the latest technologies and topics in open source, and hear from industry experts including keynotes from:

  • Ajay Agrawal, Artificial Intelligence & Machine Learning Expert, Author of Prediction Machines, and Founder, The Creative Destruction Lab
  • Jennifer Cloer, Founder of reTHINKit and Creator and Executive Producer, The Chasing Grace Project
  • Wim Coekaerts, Senior Vice President of Operating Systems and Virtualization Engineering, Oracle
  • Ben Golub, Executive Chairman and Interim CEO, and Shawn Wilkinson, Co-founder, Storj Labs
  • Preethi Kasireddy, Founder & CEO, TruStory
  • Window Snyder, Chief Security Officer, Fastly
  • Imad Sousou, Corporate Vice President and General Manager, Open Source Technology Center, Intel
  • Sana Tariq, Senior Architect, E2E Service Orchestration, TELUS


Additional keynotes and the full schedule of 250+ sessions will be announced next week. Details on co-located events, evening activities, and other activities—including Speed Mentoring, First-Time Attendee Breakfast, Women in Open Source Lunch, Diversity Mixer, Kids Day, and more—will be announced shortly as well.

Register now and save $300 through June 17!

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Linux kernel

Get insights from Jon Corbet on the state of Linux kernel development.

At the recent Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit, I sat down with Jonathan Corbet, the founder and editor-in-chief of LWN to discuss a wide range of topics, including the annual Linux kernel report.

The annual Linux Kernel Development Report, released by The Linux Foundation is the evolution of work Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman had been doing independently for years. The goal of the report is to document various facets of kernel development, such as who is doing the work, what is the pace of the work, and which companies are supporting the work.

Linux kernel contributors

To learn more about the companies supporting Linux kernel development in particular, Corbet wrote a set of scripts with the release of kernel 2.6.20, to pull the information out of the kernel repository. That information helped Corbet associate contributions with employers, whenever possible.

When Corbet published a report based on these findings in LWN, it created a bit of a stir. “It was a surprise to everyone, including me, because there was still this image of free software in general and Linux in particular as being something produced by kids who haven’t moved out of their parents basements,” said Corbet.

He found that more than 70 percent of the code going into the kernel was coming from professional developers who were getting paid to do that work. “Since then things have changed and our numbers have gotten better. Today, over 90 percent of the code is coming from professional developers who are employed by some company to work on the kernel,” he said.

Corbet has been involved with the Linux kernel from a very early stage, so connecting the dots was not too difficult, even though not all developers use official company email accounts,

“In most cases, we know who is working for which company. Sometimes people contact us and say that their employer wants to ensure that they do get credit for the work they are doing in the kernel. Sometimes we just ask who they are working for,” said Corbet.

Corbet not only gathers valuable data about the Linux kernel, he also analyzes the data to see some patterns and trends. The biggest trend, over the years, has been a decline in the number of contributions coming from volunteers, which has decreased from 15 percent to 6 percent since the 2.6.20 release.

“There are times when we have worried about it because volunteers are often the people who are in the next round of paid developers. That’s often how you get into the community — by doing a little bit of stuff on your own time,” he said. Corbet did a bit of digging to see the employment status of people when their very first patch merged and their latest status. He found that at this point most of those people were already working for some company.

While it’s true there are fewer volunteer developers now, it could also be said that people don’t remain volunteers for very long because when their code gets merged into the kernel, companies tend to approach these developers and offer jobs. So, if your code shows up in the kernel, that’s a good resume to have.

What keeps Corbet awake at night

There has been a growing concern of late that the Linux kernel community is getting older. Looking at the top maintainers, for example, you can see a lot of people who have been involved since the 1990s.

“The upper cadre is definitely getting a little bit older, a little bit grayer. There is some truth to that and I think the concerns of that are not entirely overblown,” said Corbet. “A whole bunch of us managed to stumble into something good back in the ’90s, and we have stuck with it ever since because it’s been a great ride.”

That doesn’t mean new people are not coming in. A new kernel is released every 9 to 10 weeks. And, every new release sees contributions from more than 200 developers submitting their very first patch.

“We are bringing a lot of new people into the community,” Corbet said. “Maybe half of those 200 contributors will never contribute anything again. They had one thing they wanted to fix and then they moved on. But there are a lot many others who stick around and become long-term members of the community. Some of these worked their way into the subsystem maintainer positions. They will be replacing the older members as they retire.”

Corbet is not at all worried about the aging community as it has evolved into an “organic” body with continuous flow of fresh blood. It’s true that becoming a kernel developer is more demanding; you do have to work your way into it a little bit, but plenty of people are doing it.

“I’m not really worried about the future of our community because we are doing so well at attracting bright new developers,” said Corbet, “We have an influx rate that any other project would just love to have.”

However, he did admit that the community is showing increasing signs of stress at the maintainer level. “The number of maintainers is not scaling with a number of developers,” he said. However, he said, this problem is not unique to the kernel community; the whole free software community is facing this challenge.

Another concern for Corbet is the emergence of other kernels, such as Google’s Fuchsia. These kernels are being developed specifically to be permissively licensed, which allows them to  be controlled by one or a very small number of companies. “Some of those kernels could push Linux aside in various subfields,” said Corbet. “I think some of the corporate community members have lost sight of what made Linux great and so successful. It could be useful for some companies in the short term, but I don’t think it’s going to be a good thing for anyone in the long term.”

Core needs

Corbet also noted another worrisome trend. Although many companies contribute to every kernel release, if you look closely you will see that a lot of these contributions are toward making their own hardware work great with Linux.

“It’s a great thing. We have been asking them to do it for years, but there is a whole lot of the kernel that everyone needs,” he said. There is the memory management subsystem. There’s the virtual filesystem layer. There are components of the kernel that are not tied to any single company’s hardware, and it’s harder to find companies willing to support them.

“Some of the companies that contribute to the most code to the kernel do not contribute to the core kernel at all,” said Corbet.

Corbet also worries about the lack of quality documentation and has himself initiated some efforts to improve the situation. “Nobody wants to pay for documentation,” he said. “There is nobody whose job it is to write documentation for the kernel, and it really shows in the quality. So, some of those areas I think are really going to hurt us going forward. We need to get better investment there.”

You can hear more from Jon Corbet, including insights on the recent Spectre and Meltdown issues, in his presentation from Embedded Linux Conference:

You can learn more about the Linux kernel development process in the complete annual report. Download the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report now.

OS Summit

See schedule highlights for Automotive Linux Summit and Open Source Summit Japan in Tokyo, June 20-22.

Attend Automotive Linux Summit and Open Source Summit Japan in Tokyo, June 20 – 22, for three days of open source education and collaboration.

Automotive Linux Summit connects those driving innovation in automotive Linux from the developer community, with the vendors and users providing and using the code, in order to propel the future of embedded devices in the automotive arena.

Open Source Summit Japan is the leading conference in Japan connecting the open source ecosystem under one roof, providing a forum for technologists and open source industry leaders to collaborate and share information, learn about the latest in open source technologies and find out how to gain a competitive advantage by using innovative, open solutions. The event covers cornerstone open source technology areas such as Linux, cloud infrastructure, and cloud native applications and explores the newest trends including networking, blockchain, serverless, edge computing and AI. It also offers an open source leadership track covering compliance, governance and community.

Session highlights for Automotive Linux Summit:

  • Enabling Hardware Configuration Flexibility Keeping a Unified Software – Dominig ar Foll, Intel
  • Beyond the AGL Virtualization Architecture – AGL Virtualization Expert Group (EG-VIRT) – Michele Paolino, Virtual Open Systems
  • High-level API for Smartphone Connectivity on AGL – Takeshi Kanemoto, RealVNC Ltd.
  • AGL Development Tools – What’s New in FF? – Stephane Desneux, IoT.bzh

Session highlights for Open Source Summit Japan:

  • Building the Next Generation of IoT Applications – Dave Chen, GE Digital
  • Use Cases for Permissioned Blockchain Platforms – Swetha Repakula & Jay Guo, IBM
  • Using Linux for Long Term – Community Status and the Way We Go  – Tsugikazu Shibata, NEC
  • Hitchhiker’s Guide to Machine Learning with Kubernetes – Vishnu Kannan, Google
  • OSS Vulnerability Trends and PoC 2017-2018  – Kazuki Omo, SIOS Technology, Inc.
  • Microservices, Service Mesh, and CI/CD Pipelines – Making It All Work Together  – Brian Redmond, Microsoft

View the Full Schedule >>

Register now and save $175 through April 28!

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Note: One registration gets you access to both Automotive Linux Summit and Open Source Summit Japan.

Linux Foundation members and LF project members receive an additional 20% discount off current registration pricing, and academic, student, non-profit, and community discounts are available as well. Email events@linuxfoundation.org to receive your discount code.

Applications for diversity and needs-based scholarships are also being accepted. Get information on eligibility and how to apply.

LC3

LC3 Schedule Announced | Register Now to Save $90USD/505RMB | 日程表已公布 | 立即注册可节省 90 美元/ 505 元人民币

Join us in Beijing June 25 – 27, for three days of education across 175+ sessions, collaboration opportunities with open source technologists and professionals from around the globe, and the chance to learn about the newest trends and topics in open source.

Conference tracks include:

  • Cloud Native, Serverless & Microservices
  • Infrastructure & Automation for Cloud, Cloud Native & DevOps
  • Artificial Intelligence & Deep Learning
  • Internet of Things & M2M
  • Linux Systems & Development
  • Networking & Orchestration
  • Blockchain
  • Emerging Technologies & Wildcard
  • KVM
  • Open Source Leadership

In addition, LC3 will feature an Executive Business Leadership track on Tuesday, June 26. The schedule for this track will be announced shortly.

VIEW THE FULL SCHEDULE 

Keynote speakers include:

  • Kelsey Hightower, Developer Advocate, Google
  • Abby Kearns, Executive Director, Cloud Foundry Foundation
  • Greg Kroah-Hartman, Linux Kernel Maintainer
  • Michelle Noorali, Senior Software Engineer, Microsoft
  • Linus Torvalds, Creator of Linux & Git, in conversation with Dirk Hohndel, VP & Chief Open Source Officer, VMware
  • Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation

Additional keynotes from companies including Alibaba, Baidu, Huawei, Intel and SUSE will be announced shortly.

REGISTER NOW

Need assistance convincing your manager? Here’s a letter that can help you make the request to attend LC3. Register now to save $90USD/505RMB through April 30.

参加 LC3 在北京召开的为期三天(6 月 25 日至 27 日)的开源教育与合作会议。

参加我们将于 6 月 25 日至 27 日在北京召开的为期三天的 超过175场的会议,与来自世界各地的开源技术专家和专业人士进行合作,并有机会了解开源的最新趋势和主题。

会议主题包括:

  • 云原生,无服务器与微服务
  • 云、云原生和 DevOps 的基础结构和自动化
  • 人工智能和深度学习
  • 物联网与 M2M
  • Linux 系统与开发
  • 网络与编制
  • 区块链
  • 新兴技术与通配符
  • KVM(基于内核的虚拟机)
  • 开源领导力

此外,LC3 将于 6 月 26 日(星期二)召开以“执行业务领导力”为主题的会议。我们将尽快公布此主题的时间表。

查看完整的时间表

主讲人包括:

  • Kelsey Hightower,开发者倡导者,Google
  • Abby Kearns,执行董事Cloud Foundry Foundation
  • Greg Kroah-Hartman,Linux 内核维护者
  • Michelle Noorali,高级软件工程师Microsoft
  • Linus Torvalds,Linux 和 Git 的创始人,并与 VMware 副总裁兼首席开发官 Dirk Hohnde 进行交谈
  • Jim Zemlin,执行总监,The Linux Foundation

近期还将公布包含阿里巴巴、百度、华为、英特尔和 SUSE 等公司的其他主题演讲。

现在注册

需要我们帮助您说服您的经理?这封信可以帮助您提出参加 LC3 的申请。4 月 30 日前注册,即可节省 90 美元/ 505 元人民币。

linux kernel developer

Linux kernel developer Steven Rostedt maintains the Real Time Stable releases of the Linux kernel.

Linus Torvalds recently released version 4.16 of the Linux kernel. These releases typically occur every nine to ten weeks, and each one contains the work of more than 1,600 developers representing over 200 corporations, according to the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report, written by Jonathan Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman. In this series, we’re highlighting some of the developers who contribute to the kernel.

Steven Rostedt, Open Source Programmer at VMware, maintains the Real Time Stable releases of the Linux kernel, among other things. Rostedt is one of the original developers of the PREEMPT_RT patch and began working on it in 2004 with the goal of turning Linux into a real-time designed operating system. He is also the main author, developer, and maintainer of Ftrace, a tool designed to help developers find what is going on inside the kernel. According to the Ftrace wiki, the tool can be used for debugging or analyzing latencies and performance issues that take place outside of user-space.

Linux kernel dev

Steven Rostedt

Additionally, this past year, Rostedt found time to speak at various events and serve on The Linux Foundation’s technical advisory board. Here are Rostedt’s responses to our questions.

Linux Foundation: What role do you play in the community and what subsystem(s) do you work on?

Steven Rostedt: I partake in a lot of the Linux Foundation events as well as Kernel Recipes, Linux Plumbers, sometimes Linux Tag and other events. I’m on The Linux Foundation’s Technical Advisory Board (TAB) and was on the Linux Plumbers programming committee. I’m an Open Source advocate and try to communicate to people what that means. I maintain the Real Time Stable releases, and the Ftrace (Linux kernel tracer) subsystem, as well as ktest, localmodconfig, and Ftrace tools like trace-cmd and KernelShark.

Linux Foundation: What have you been working on this year? / What’s one way you have contributed to the 4.8 to 4.13 releases?

Rostedt: I’ve been working on having ftrace trace init functions in both the main kernel core as well as in modules. Between 4.8 and 4.13, I rewrote the function tracing trigger code to be able to be expanded and used to enable function filtering for tracing on modules before they are loaded.

Linux Foundation:  What do you think the kernel community needs to work on in the upcoming year?

Rostedt: I think more focus should be on eBPF and helping it be easier to use as well as having an eye on security. Running a VM within the kernel can be very dangerous, and people need to use caution and be extra careful during development.

Linux Foundation: Why do you contribute to the Linux kernel?

Rostedt: Because it is the one place that you have total control over your computer.

At the recent Embedded Linux Conference, Rostedt presented a session on “Maintaining a Real Time Stable Kernel,” in which he explained what’s required to maintain a stable RT tree, which is a bit different from maintaining a normal stable tree. In this talk, he covered various tools that can be used and described the current tests performed to ensure that the RT stable kernel is fully functional.

You can learn more about the Linux kernel development process and read more developer profiles in the full report. Download the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report now.

To find and report bugs, Linux kernel developers depend on a wide community of testers.

A kernel that has had nearly 83,000 patches applied will certainly have a few bugs introduced along with the new features, states the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report, written by Jonathan Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman.Linux kernel

To find and report those bugs, Linux kernel developers depend on a wide community of testers. And, according to convention, when a bug-fixing patch is applied to the kernel, it should contain a “Reported-by” tag to credit the tester who found the problem. During the period covered by the most recent report, more than 4,100 patches carried such tags, and the top 21 bug reporters are shown in the table at right.

Julia Lawall, Senior Researcher at Inria, is one of the developers involved in the bug reporting process, as she works on the Coccinelle tool that is used to find bugs in the kernel. Here, Lawall answers a few questions about her contributions to the development process.

Linux kernel

Julia Lawall

The Linux Foundation: What role do you play in the community and what subsystem(s) do you work on?

Julia Lawall: I work on the tool Coccinelle that is used to find bugs in the Linux kernel and perform large-scale evolutions.

The Linux Foundation: What have you been working on this year?

Lawall: This year I have been working with Bhumika Goyal on making various kernel structures read-only. We have constified over 1500 structures this year. This work has also motivated various bug fixes and performance improvements in Coccinelle.

I have also been working on automatically identifying patches that should be considered for backporting to stable kernels, in collaboration with Greg K-H, Sasha Levin, and colleagues at Singapore Management University. Our approach is still work in progress, but several hundred commits that were not originally tagged for stable have been identified and applied to stable versions.

The Linux Foundation: What do you think the kernel community needs to work on in the upcoming year?

Lawall: Initial experiments suggest that the rate of propagation of commits to stable is rather uneven across the kernel. This can be due to the different properties of different subsystems, but there can also be room for maintainers to annotate commits for stable kernels more frequently and consistently.

The Linux Foundation: Why do you contribute to the Linux kernel?

Lawall: Many reasons: the potential impact, the challenge of understanding a huge code base of low-level code, the chance to interact with a community with a very high level of technical skill.

You can learn more about the Linux kernel development process and read more developer profiles in the full report. Download the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report now.