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The Real-Time Linux project team continues to prepare the remaining patches for inclusion into the mainline kernel.

Long ago in 2009, a small team of kernel developers had finished consolidating previous  prototypic developments to make Linux real-time capable into a single out-of-tree patch set, called the PREEMPT_RT patch set. This patch set can be applied to turn a vanilla mainline Linux kernel without real-time capabilities into a real-time capable Linux kernel. Many companies use this patch set to build various industrial systems that required to implement hard real-time properties at comparatively relaxed time bounds of about one millisecond precision.

BMW Car IT also used this patch set to build real-time capable prototypes for complex functions in the area of autonomous driving. However, from the beginning with the development of those prototypes, it was clear that any product with high-quality demands requires to get the PREEMPT_RT patch set in the main-line development for increased compatibility of features, stronger quality assurance and reduced maintenance. Hence, BMW Car IT started driving efforts to make Linux real-time capable in 2014.

First, BMW Car IT joined OSADL, the Open Source Automation Development Lab, as a Gold member to support real-time Linux development activities, which was collaboratively funded by the OSADL member at that time.

Second, our former colleague Daniel Wagner started to get acquainted with the existing PREEMPT_RT patch in 2014 and made a number of contributions to the Linux kernel related to real-time capabilities from 2015 until end of 2016. Due to his experience with the PREEMPT_RT patch, he is now the maintainer of the Linux 4.4 real-time stable branch, and one of the three maintainers for the real-time stable patch branches.

Since 2016, the Real-time Linux project has been a collaborative project under the umbrella of the Linux Foundation. The project’s goal is to make the mainline Linux real-time capable. The project ensures that the Linux kernel developers have the ability to continue development work, long-term support and future research for a real-time-capable Linux.

Rewriting and Refactoring

In the last two years, 2016 and 2017, the Real-time Linux development team rewrote the CPU hotplug infrastructure and refactored the timer wheel and high-resolution timers. This already reduced the out-of-tree PREEMPT_RT patch set significantly.

Due to a funding decrease that became apparent at the beginning of 2018, the development in the Real-time Linux project would have reduced its workforce. Fortunately, Intel and BMW Car IT could close this funding gap. Intel increased their membership from Gold to Platinum and BMW Car IT joined Linux Foundation and the collaborative project as Gold member in the Real-time Linux Project. So now after those project adjustments, the Real-time Linux Project team is back on track and continues to prepare the remaining patches for inclusion into the mainline development with full speed.

In 2018, the Real-time Linux kernel team will be refactoring, rewriting and generally improving the printk and soft interrupt infrastructure and other smaller other parts. This work will prepare the Linux kernel source code so that all further real-time specific changes can smoothly be merged into the mainline kernel.

The real-time functionality touches the core kernel parts (i.e., it requires significant changes in timers, schedulers, locking mechanisms, interrupt handling and more), and it also is a cross-cutting concern for all drivers (i.e., every driver has to follow a certain discipline to make the overall kernel real-time capable). Hence, it is difficult to predict the exact date when the Real-time Linux Project will finally have all its patches merged into the main-line development. However, there is no doubt that the Linux kernel will eventually become real-time capable.

“The Linux kernel is a software development project of huge invest to us. Obviously, BMW Car IT has a high interest of making best possible use of this software asset. The automotive industry has particular requirements, such as higher real-time requirements and the need for longer maintenance periods, than the general IT and consumer electronics industry. With our investments in initiatives addressing these requirements, we can ensure that Linux fits to our needs,” says Kai-Uwe Balszuweit, CEO of BMW Car IT.

Reviewing and Testing

Once the real-time capabilities have been integrated in the main-line development, the project work is of course not just finished and the Real-time Linux project cannot just be abandoned. After the final integration into the main-line development, the development activities will slowly shift its focus:

The core system will not require further changes for the real-time capability, but the Real-Time Linux development team will need to review, test and adjust new incoming features from other kernel development teams to keep the kernel real-time capable when these new features are included.

Furthermore, the already existing real-time stable trees must be further continued to be maintained until the end of life of the corresponding kernel LTS version, so commonly two years for most LTS versions, but possibly even longer. Slowly over the years, the real-time stable trees for older kernel versions will reach their end of life, while for younger LTS kernel versions, which have the real-time capabilities fully included, have no need to maintain a separate real-time stable branch. This will decrease the working effort on the current real-time stable maintainers and they can focus their work to assist in the quality assurance of the continuous main-line development.

Of course, all users and stakeholders of the real-time capability must continue to support all these activities over the next years.

This is well understood at BMW Car IT, and we expect that other companies that require the real-time capability in Linux will also follow and express this general common understanding. Beyond software development until start of production, operations and maintenance is an important software development activity that is not underestimated at BMW Car IT.

Christian Salzmann, the CEO of BMW Car IT, states it clearly: “Providing good software solutions to BMW for many years, BMW Car IT knows that continuous operations and maintenance is one of the major cornerstones for providing a great experience to our customers. The continuous activity of development and operations of software going hand-in-hand, in short DevOps, is part of BMW Car IT’s company mindset. BMW Car IT’s support for further development and operations in the Real-time Linux Project is no exception to this rule.”

SPDX License Identifiers can be used to indicate relevant license information at any level, from package to the source code file level.

Accurately identifying the license for open source software is important for license compliance. However, determining the license can sometimes be difficult due to a lack of information or ambiguous information. Even when there is some licensing information present, a lack of consistent ways of expressing the license can make automating the task of license detection very difficult, thus requiring significant amounts of manual human effort.   There are some commercial tools applying machine learning to this problem to reduce the false positives, and train the license scanners, but a better solution is to fix the problem at the upstream source.

In 2013,  the U-boot project decided to use the SPDX license identifiers in each source file instead of the GPL v2.0 or later header boilerplate that had been used up to that point.   The initial commit message had an eloquent explanation of reasons behind this transition.

Licenses: introduce SPDX Unique Lincense Identifiers


Like many other projects, U-Boot has a tradition of including big

blocks of License headers in all files.  This not only blows up the

source code with mostly redundant information, but also makes it very

difficult to generate License Clearing Reports.  An additional problem

is that even the same lincenses are referred to by a number of

slightly varying text blocks (full, abbreviated, different

indentation, line wrapping and/or white space, with obsolete address

information, ...) which makes automatic processing a nightmare.


To make this easier, such license headers in the source files will be

replaced with a single line reference to Unique Lincense Identifiers

as defined by the Linux Foundation's SPDX project [1].  For example,

in a source file the full "GPL v2.0 or later" header text will be

replaced by a single line:


        SPDX-License-Identifier:        GPL-2.0+


We use the SPDX Unique Lincense Identifiers here; these are available

at [2].

. . .


[1] http://spdx.org/

[2] http://spdx.org/licenses/

The SPDX project liked the simplicity of this approach and formally adopted U-Boot’s syntax for embedding SPDX-License-Identifier’s into the project.  Initially, the syntax was available on the project WIKI and was formalized in SPDX specification version 2.1 “Appendix V: Using SPDX short identifiers in Source Files”.  Since then,  other upstream open source projects and repositories have adopted use of these short identifiers to identify the licenses in use, including github in its licenses-API.  In 2017, the Free Software Foundation Europe created a project called REUSE.software  that provided guidance for open source projects on how to apply the SPDX-License-Identifiers into projects.   The REUSE.software guidelines were followed for adding SPDX-License-Identifiers into the Linux kernel, later that year.

The SPDX-License-Identifier syntax used with short identifiers from the SPDX License List short form identifiers (referred here as SPDX LIDs) can be used to indicate relevant license information at any level,  from package to the source code file level. The “SPDX-License-Identifier” phrase and a license expresssion formed of SPDX LIDs in a comment form a precise, concise and language neutral way to document the licensing, that is simple to machine process.  This leads to source code that is easier to read, which appeals to developers, as well as enabling the licensing information to travel with the source code.

To use SPDX LIDs in your project’s source code,  just add a single line in the following format, tailored to your license(s) and the comment style for that file’s language.  For example:

// SPDX-License-Identifier: MIT

/* SPDX-License-Identifier: MIT OR Apache-2.0 */

# SPDX-License-Identifer: GPL-2.0-or-later

To learn more about how to use SPDXLIDs with your source code,  please see the guidance in the documentation in the SPDX project, REUSE.software  or David Wheeler’s SPDX tutorial.    

In addition to U-boot and Linux transitioning to use the SPDXLIDs,  newer projects like Zephyr and Hyperleger fabric have adopted them right from the start as a best practice.   Indeed, to achieve the Core Infrastructure Initiative’s gold badge, each file in the source code must have a license, and the recommended way is to use an SPDX LID.  

The project MUST include a license statement in each source file. This MAY be done by 
including the following inside a comment near the beginning of each file: 
SPDX-License-Identifier: [SPDX license expression for project].

When SPDX LIDs are used,  gathering license information across your project files can start to become as easy as running grep. If a source file gets reused in a different package,  the license information travels with the source, reducing the risk of licence identification errors, and making license compliance in the recipient project easier.  By using SPDX LIDs in license expressions, the meaning of license combinations is understood more accurately. Saying “this file is MPL/MIT” is ambiguous, and leaves recipients unclear about their compliance requirements. Saying “MPL-2.0 AND MIT” or “MPL-2.0 OR MIT” specifies precisely whether the licensee must comply with both licenses, or either license, when redistributing the file.

As illustrated by the transition underway in the Linux kernel,  SPDX LIDs can be adopted gradually. You can start by adding SPDX LIDs to new files without changing anything already present in your codebase.  A list of projects known to be using SPDX License Identifiers can be found at: https://spdx.org/ids-where,  and if you know of one that’s missing,  please send email to outreach@lists.spdx.org.  

Learn more in this presentation at Open Source Summit: Automating the Creation of Open Source BOMs

Join 500+ CIOs, senior technologists, and IT decision makers at Open FinTech Forum, October 10-11 in New York.

The Schedule is Now Live for Open FinTech Forum!

Join 500+ CIOs, senior technologists, and IT decision makers at Open FinTech Forum to learn the best strategies for building internal open source programs and how to leverage cutting-edge open source technologies for the financial services industry, including AI, Blockchain, Kubernetes, Cloud Native and more, to drive efficiencies and flexibility.

Featured Sessions Include:

  • Build Intelligent Applications with Azure Cognitive Service and CNTK – Bhakthi Liyanage, Bank of America
  • Smart Money Bets on Open Source Adoption in AI/ML Fintech Applications – Laila Paszti, GTC Law Group P.C.
  • Adapting Kubernetes for Machine Learning Workflows – Ania Musial & Keith Laban, Bloomberg
  • Real-World Kubernetes Use Cases in Financial Services: Lessons learned from Capital One, BlackRock and Bloomberg – Jeffrey Odom, Capital One; Michael Francis, BlackRock; Kevin Fleming, Bloomberg; Paris Pittman, Google; and Ron Miller, TechCrunch
  • Distributed Ledger Technology Deployments & Use Cases in Financial Services – Hanna Zubko, IntellectEU; Jesse Chenard, MonetaGo; Umar Farooq, JP Morgan; Julio Faura, Santander Bank; and Robert Hackett, Fortune
  • Enterprise Blockchain Adoption – Trends and Predictions – Saurabh Gupta, HfS Research
  • Why Two Sigma Contributes to Open Source – Julia Meinwald, Two Sigma
  • Three Cs to an Open Source Program Office – Justin Rackliffe, Fidelity Investments

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Linux Foundation members and LF project members receive a 20% discount on registration pricing. FinTech CIOs and senior technologists may receive a 50% discount on registration fees.

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The power of cloud lies in the ability to create ideas and get them into production as quickly as possible, said Cloud Foundry’s Abby Kearns at LC3.

Cloud and open source are changing the world and can play an integral role in how companies transform themselves. That was the message from Abby Kearns, executive director of open source platform as a service provider Cloud Foundry Foundation, who delivered a keynote address earlier this summer at LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen China, known as LC3.

“Cloud native technologies and cloud native applications are growing,’’ Kearns said. Over the next 18 months, there will be a 100 percent increase in the number of cloud native applications organizations are writing and using, she added. “This means you can no longer just invest in IT,” but need to in cloud and cloud technologies as well.

The power of the cloud

CIOs are thinking about how to do more with what they have, how to be innovative and keep an eye toward the future while saving money, Kearns said. Architects have to think about how to build an infrastructure that supports future needs and developers need to think about developing the new apps to allow their organizations to be competitive. So everyone’s jobs have gotten harder as a result, Kearns noted. It can be made easier, she maintained, with collaboration and open source.

“Collectively, the capabilities we can bring to bear around cloud are way more powerful through open source,” she said.

Kearns also discussed the digital transformation movement, and said organizations are looking to become software companies and write and develop code and get it into production as quickly as possible on any cloud. At the same time, they are also trying to figure out how to be more responsive to customers as their needs change and ultimately, get new ideas out to market quicker and iterate on those ideas over and over.

Real world use cases

To give the audience an idea of what the future will look like and where investments are being made in cloud and open source, Kearns cited a few examples. The automotive industry is changing rapidly, she said, and a Volkswagen automobile, for example, is no longer just a car; it has become a connected mobile device filled with sensors and data.

“Volkswagen realized they need to build out developer teams and applications that could take advantage of many clouds across 12 different brands,” she said. The car company has invested in Cloud Foundry and cloud native technologies to help them do that, she added.

“At the end of the day it’s about the applications that extend that car through mobile apps, supply chain management — all of that pulled together to bring a single concise experience for the automotive industry.”

One of her “favorite” examples is the U.S. Air Force, which Kearns said isn’t often thought of as being agile and using bleeding-edge technology. Although the Air Force has a “massive technology budget,” 70 percent of it was going toward just maintaining existing infrastructure. Only 30 percent was going toward research and development and new software.

But the Air Force has implemented agile practices and is now taking advantage of cloud and developing apps to run on multiple clouds, she said. These changes allowed them to rethink how they allocate time and money, and they have been able to get apps out the door — in weeks and months — instead of years, she said.

Today, 70 percent of its budget is going toward R&D and 30 percent toward maintaining existing infrastructure. “And in the process, they also saved $600 million in one year,’’ Kearns added.

In another example, she said Home Depot found itself being disrupted by big e-commerce leaders like Amazon, which sold more hammers in a year than it did. “They needed to figure out how to compete … on cloud with cloud native apps and iterate and develop those applications quickly,’’ Kearns said.

Home Depot invested in a platform and made the shift to continuous delivery and moved thousands of apps to public and private clouds. They went from spending six weeks to develop one app and get it in production to deploying a new app to production every 15 minutes, she said.

That’s the power of cloud, cloud platforms and cloud native architectures; the ability to create ideas and get them into production as quickly as possible, she stressed.

The examples Kearns gave were all done using open source, which “provides an opportunity for all of us to collectively work together, and brings together diverse minds, diverse organizations and diverse people to drive real innovation. That’s what makes open source so powerful.”

Watch the entire presentation below:

keynotes

Check out the first round of keynotes for Open Source Summit and ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe, coming up October 22-24 in Edinburgh.

Announcing the first round of keynote speakers for Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference + OpenIoT Summit Europe!

Keynotes include:

  • Patrick Ball, Director of Research, Human Rights Data Analysis Group
  • Eric Berlow, Co-Founder, Chief Science Officer, Vibrant Data Inc.
  • Linus Torvalds, Creator of Linux & Git, in conversation with Dirk Hohndel, Vice President & Chief Open Source Officer, VMware
  • Ed Cable, President & Chief Executive Officer, Mifos Initiative
  • Jonathan Corbet, Author, Kernel Developer and Executive Editor, LWN.net
  • Johanna Koester, Program Director of Developer Technology and Advocacy, IBM
  • Dr. Alexander Nitz, Gravitational-wave Researcher, Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics
  • Brenda Romero, Award-Winning Game Designer, Fulbright Scholar & Entrepreneur
  • Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation

The conference schedule will be released on August 14, with additional keynote announcements to follow.

Open Source Summit is THE leading conference for developers, architects and other technologists – as well as open source community and industry leaders – to collaborate and learn about the latest technologies and gain a competitive advantage by using innovative open solutions. Join us for 200+ sessions and co-located events including Linux Security Summit, Zephyr Hackathon – “Get Connected,” LF Energy Summit, and Tracing Summit.

Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) is the premier technical conference for companies and developers using Linux in embedded products. The conference gathers user-space developers, product vendors, kernel, and systems developers to collaborate.

OpenIoT Summit is the technical conference for the developers and architects working on industrial IoT. It provides the technical knowledge needed to deliver smart connected products and solutions that take advantage of the rapid evolution of IoT technologies. It is the only IoT event focused on the development of open IoT solutions.

Sign up to receive updates on Open Source Summit Europe + OpenIoT Summit: 

Registration includes access to all three events!

Secure your spot and register now to save $300! The early bird registration deadline ends August 18.

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Need help convincing your manager? Here’s a letter that can help you make the request to attend Open Source Summit & ELC + OpenIoT Summit Europe.

Applications for diversity and needs-based scholarships are also being accepted. Get information on eligibility and how to apply. Free childcare is also available for attendees.

Check out the co-located events at Open Source Summit, including Kubernetes training & more!

What makes attending Open Source Summit so valuable?

The people who attend, and the sharing of information that transpires when 2,000 open source leaders from around the globe gather to work together to transform technology.

In addition to education opportunities stemming from 250+ conference sessions and a plethora of collaboration opportunities in the hallway track and at networking events, Open Source Summit (previously LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen) offers added learning opportunities with a variety of co-located events: 11 this year to be exact.

The cost of travel can be the biggest hardship of attending an event, so you should make the most of it. Open Source Summit offers a number of ways to gain additional value from your trip.

This year’s co-located events and special events offerings include:

Co-Located Events

Linux Security Summit North America

Monday, August 27- Tuesday, August 28*

The Linux Security Summit is a technical forum for collaboration between Linux developers, researchers, and end users. Its primary aim is to foster community efforts in analyzing and solving Linux security challenges.

mountpoint 2018

Monday, August 27- Tuesday, August 28*

mountpoint 2018 unites the Ceph and Gluster communities, SDS experts, and partners to bring you an exciting two-day event.

LF Deep Learning Workshop

Tuesday, August 28*

Learn more about how the Linux Foundation’s Deep Learning Foundation is supporting open source innovation in Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and Deep Learning.

CHAOSScon North America

Tuesday, August 28*

This conference will show CHAOSS updates, use cases, and hands-on workshops for developers, community managers, project managers, and anyone interested in measuring open source project health.

Cloud-Native Network Functions (CNF) Seminar

Tuesday, August 28*

Two of the fastest-growing Linux Foundation projects – ONAP (part of LF Networking) and Kubernetes (part of CNCF) – are coming together in the next generation telecom architecture. This interactive seminar will be co-moderated by LF Networking GM Arpit Joshipura and Cloud Native Computing Foundation Executive Director Dan Kohn.

Egeria Open Metadata & Governance Workshop

Tuesday, August 28*

Learn more about Egeria, a new project from the ODPi that supports the free flow of metadata between different technologies.

OpenAPI Workshop

Tuesday, August 28*

Participate in this hands-on workshop to learn what OpenAPI is, who is using it, what you can do with it, as well as hands-on training on its advanced features, and a preview of the anticipated September 2018 release.

OpenChain Mini Summit

Tuesday, August 28*

The workshop will feature new compliance reference material, new training material, new case studies, interactive panels, and plenty of networking.

OpenHPC Workshop

Tuesday, August 28*

Participants will get a hands-on experience installing a bare metal instance of OpenHPC on clustered Intel NUCs to see how easy it is to get started.

LFCS & Linux on Azure Training Courses

Wednesday, August 29 – Thursday, August 30*

Presented by ITGilde and The Linux Foundation.

Cloud & Container Apprentice Linux Engineer Tutorials

Wednesday, August 29 – Friday, August 31

Event Experiences:

Lightning Talks

Tuesday, August 28

Better Together Diversity Social

Tuesday, August 28*

Vancouver Sightseeing Bus Tour

Wednesday, August 29*

First-time Attendee Breakfast

Wednesday, August 29

Open Source Career Mixer

Wednesday, August 29*

Women in Open Source Lunch

Wednesday, August 29*

All-Attendee Opening Reception at Vancouver Aquarium

Wednesday, August 29

Meet & Eat

Wednesday, August 29 – Friday, August 31*

Diversity Empowerment Summit

Wednesday, August 29 – Friday, August 31

Open Collaboration Conference

Wednesday, August 29 – Friday, August 31

5K Fun Run

Thursday, August 30*

Speed Mentoring & Networking

Thursday, August 30*

Onsite Attendee Reception & Sponsor Showcase

Thursday, August 30

Invitation Only Partner Reception

Thursday, August 30

Morning Meditation

Friday, August 31*

Kids Day

Friday, August 31*

Puppy Pawlooza

Friday, August 31

*Limited availability and/or requires pre-registration

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Open Source Summit

Open Source Summit is THE place to learn about latest open source trends and technologies. Register now!

Open Source Summit North America is right around the corner. There will be hundreds of sessions, workshops, and talks, all curated by experts in the Linux and open source communities. It’s not an easy feat to choose the topics and sessions you want to attend at the event  because there are so many topics and only so much time.

In this article, we talk with Laura Abbott, a developer employed by Red Hat, and Bryan Liles, a developer at Heptio, a Kubernetes company, based in Seattle, Washington, about the upcoming event. Abbott is on the program committee for Open Source Summit, and Liles is one of the program chairs, working hard “to build out a schedule that touches on many aspects of Open Source.”

Hot topics

“I’ve been interested in cloud-native applications for a few years now, and I spend most of my time thinking about the problems and developing software in this space,” said Liles. “I’m also interested in computer vision, augmented reality, and virtual reality. One of the most important topics in this space right now is Machine Learning. It’s amazing to see all the open source solutions being created. I feel that even as a hobbyist, I can find tools to help me build and run models without causing me to go into debt. Personally, I’m looking forward to the talks in the Infrastructure & Automation and the Kubernetes/Containers/Cloud Native Apps tracks.”

Here are just a few of the must-see cloud computing sessions:

As a kernel developer, Abbott gets excited when people talk about their future kernel work, especially when it involves the internals like the page cache or memory management. “I also love to see topics that talk about getting people involved in projects for the first time,” she said. “I’m also excited to see the Diversity Empowerment Summit and learning from the speakers there.”

You may wonder as we are moving toward the cloud native world, where everything is running in a cloud, does Linux even matter anymore? But, the fact is Linux is powering the cloud.

“Linux is what’s powering all those topics. When people say Linux. they’re usually referring to the complete platform from kernel to userspace libraries. You need a solid base to be able to run your application in the cloud. The entire community of Linux contributors enables today’s developers to work with the latest technologies,” said Abbott.

A few of the featured talks in the Linux Systems and Development track include:

Latest Trends

“DevOps is unsurprisingly a hot topic,” said Abbott. “There is a lot of focus on how to move towards newer best practices with projects like Kubernetes and how to best monitor your infrastructure. Blockchain technologies are a very hot topic. Some of this work is very forward looking but there’s a lot of interest in figuring out if blockchain can solve existing problems,” said Abbott.

That means OSSNA is the place to be if you are interested in emerging trends and technologies. “If you are looking to see what is coming next, or currently involved in Open Source, you should attend,” says Liles. “The venue is in a great location in Vancouver, so you can also take in the city between listening to your peers during talks or debating current trends during the hallway track,” said Liles.

Abbott concluded, “Anyone who is excited about Linux should attend. There’s people talking about such a wide variety of topics from kernel development to people management. There’s something for everyone.”

Sign up to receive updates on Open Source Summit North America:

Register for Open Source Summit by August 4 to save $150.

Here’s a sneak peek at why you need to be at Open Source Summit in Vancouver next month! But hurry – spots are going quickly. Secure your space and register by August 4 to save $150.

  1. Awesome content: 250+ sessions on Linux systems, cloud native development, cloud infrastructure, AI, blockchain and open source program management & community leadership.
  2. Deep Dive Labs & Tutorials: Including Hands-On with Cilium Network Security, Cloud-native Network Functions (CNF) Seminar, Istio Playground Lab, Practical Machine Learning Lab, First Tutorial on Container Orchestration plus many more – all included in one low registration price.
  3. 3. 9 Co-located Events: Linux Security Summit, OpenChain Summit, Acumos AI Developer Mini-Summit, Cloud & Container Apprentice Linux Engineer tutorials, CHAOSSCon and much more!
  4. Evening Events: Collaborate with fellow attendees at the Vancouver Aquarium and the onsite attendee reception.
  5. Activities: Take a break and go on a sightseeing bus tour, join the 5K fun run or morning meditation, meet with fellow attendees through the meet & eat experience or networking app, or play with puppies at the Puppy Pawlooza.
  6. Diversity Empowerment: Explore ways to advance diversity and inclusion in the community and across the technology industry by attending the Diversity Empowerment Summit & Better Together Diversity Social.
  7. Kids Day: Bring your kids and introduce them to the fun and magic of web design.
  8. Women in Open Source Lunch: Join women and non-binary members of the open source community for an engaging, uplifting lunch!
  9. Developer & Hallway Track Lounges: Lounges and reserved spaces for developers to hack and collaborate throughout the event.
  10. Networking Opportunities: Attend the Speed Networking & Mentoring event or use the networking app to expand your open source community connections by finding and meeting with attendees with similar interests.

VIEW THE FULL SCHEDULE »

Sign up to receive updates on Open Source Summit: 

REGISTER NOW »

Need help convincing your manager? Here’s a letter that can help you make the request to attend Open Source Summit.

Applications for diversity and needs-based scholarships are also being accepted. Get information on eligibility and how to apply. Free childcare is also available for attendees.

Open Source Leadership

Building leadership in the community is key to establishing trust, enabling collaboration, and fostering the cultural understanding required to be effective in open source.

How important is leadership for evolving open source projects and communities? According to the most recent Open Source Guide for the Enterprise from The Linux Foundation and the TODO Group, building leadership in the community is key to establishing trust, enabling collaboration, and fostering the cultural understanding required to be effective in open source.

The new Building Leadership in an Open Source Community guide provides practical advice that can help organizations build leadership and influence within open source projects.

“Contributing code is just one aspect of creating a successful open source project,” says this Linux Foundation article introducing the latest guide. “The open source culture is fundamentally collaborative, and active involvement in shaping a project’s direction is equally important. The path toward leadership is not always straightforward, however, so the latest Open Source Guide for the Enterprise from The TODO Group provides practical advice for building leadership in open source projects and communities.” 

Indeed, the role of leadership in open source is often misunderstood, precisely because open source projects and communities are often structured to encourage highly distributed contribution models. Their distributed structure can obscure the need for central leaders who set goals and measure progress.

More Resources

In addition to the new guide, previous Open Source Guides for Enterprise explore related aspects of open source leadership. Here are some good ones to investigate:

  • Creating an Open Source Program. Open source program offices are emerging as critical to providing good leadership, and this free guide delves into how they can become designated places where open source is supported, nurtured, shared, explained, and grown inside a company.
  • Measuring Your Open Source Program’s Success. Good leaders of all types are skilled at measuring progress, and they stay on top of the right tools for working with metrics and project management. This free guide lays out a clear path for open source leaders to measure progress and set goals.
  • Recruiting Open Source Developers. Guy Martin, Director, Open at Autodesk, has noted that when interviewing developers, he is frequently asked how the company will help the developer build his or her own open source brand. Today, leadership calls for strategically appealing to developers and this free guide includes many best practices.
  • Improving Your Open Source Development Impact also delves into these topics. It examines various ways organizations can improve their internal development processes and prepare to contribute to open source projects.

Building Leadership in an Open Source Community, which features contributions from Gil Yehuda of Oath and Guy Martin of Autodesk, looks at how decisions are made, how to attract talent, when to join vs. when to create an open source project, and it offers specific approaches to becoming a good leader in open source communities.

“Companies often go through a phase of thinking ‘Oh, well, we’re huge. Why can’t we pound our fist on the table and just make the community do what we want?’ They soon come to realize that tactic won’t work,” writes Martin, in the guide. “They come to understand that the only way to gain leadership is to earn the role within the community. And the only way to do that is to gain credibility and make contributions.”

You’ll find the complete guide here, and you can browse an entire list of free Open Source Guides here.

Tencent

The Linux Foundation’s Jim Zemlin announces Internet giant Tencent’s support for open source as a Platinum member at LC3 conference in Beijing.

The Linux Foundation – home to the largest open source technology collaboration effort in the world – returned to China for the second year for the LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen conference.  China understands the great value of open source code development and how it helps maximize innovation and rapid advancement across all industries.

During our trip to China, we were thrilled to announce that Tencent has joined Huawei as the second Chinese company to become a Platinum member of The Linux Foundation, as we also celebrate other Chinese organizations, such as Alibaba, Baidu, and JD.com, becoming leaders in open source technology development.  We thank Tencent for their leadership and contribution of two open source projects – TARS and TSeer – to The Linux Foundation to encourage more collaborative development.

To further support China’s embrace of open source technology development, The Linux Foundation presented the Open Source Guides for the Enterprise translated into Chinese. These guides, produced along with The TODO Group, are an important tool to help Chinese organizations learn how to increase their involvement in this critically important effort. The guides are also part of the launch of The Linux Foundation’s new Chinese website: https://www.linuxfoundation.cn. We hope this site serves as a resource for developers, companies and other stakeholders throughout China to become more active than ever in open source.

The open source global community is about everyone benefiting together. It doesn’t matter who you are, what company you work for or what country you are from; together we are most successful when we collaboratively create great technology and solve some of the world’s most difficult problems. The Linux Foundation celebrates China’s leadership and embrace of open source, and we look forward to a long partnership in your great nation.