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Open Source Guides

The Open Source Guides for the Enterprise are now available in Chinese.

The popular Open Source Guides for the Enterprise, developed by The Linux Foundation in collaboration with the TODO Group, are now available in Chinese. This set of guides provides industry-proven best practices to help organizations successfully leverage open source.

“Making these resources available to Chinese audiences in their native language will encourage even greater adoption of and participation with open source projects,” said Chris Aniszczyk, CTO of Cloud Native Computing Foundation and co-founder of the TODO Group. The guides span various stages of the open source project lifecycle, from initial planning and formation to winding down a project.

The 10 guides now available in Mandarin include topics such as:

  • Creating an Open Source Program by Chris Aniszczyk, Cloud Native Computing Foundation; Jeff McAffer, Microsoft; Will Norris, Google; and Andrew Spyker, Netflix
  • Using Open Source Code by Ibrahim Haddad, Samsung Research America
  • Participating in Open Source Communities by Stormy Peters, Red Hat; and Nithya Ruff, Comcast
  • Recruiting Open Source Developers by Guy Martin, Autodesk; Jeff Osier-Mixon, Intel Corporation; Nithya Ruff; and Gil Yehuda, Oath
  • Measuring Your Open Source Program’s Success by Christine Abernathy, Facebook; Chris Aniszczyk; Joe Beda, Heptio; Sarah Novotny, Google; and Gil Yehuda

The translated guides were launched at the LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen China conference in Beijing, where The Linux Foundation also welcomed Chinese Internet giant Tencent as a Platinum Member. 

Open Source Summit

Check out the full schedule for Open Source Summit North America (OSSNA).

Join us August 29-31, in Vancouver, BC, for 250+ sessions covering a wide array of topics including Linux Systems, Cloud Native Applications, Blockchain, AI, Networking, Cloud Infrastructure, Open Source Leadership, Program Office Management and more. Arrive early for new bonus content on August 28 including co-located events, tutorials, labs, workshops, and lightning talks.

VIEW THE FULL SCHEDULE »


More than 2,000 developers, sysadmins, DevOps professionals, and software architects, along with community and business leaders, will convene at Open Source Summit to collaborate, on and learn about, emerging and critical open source technologies.

Plus, Open Source Summit features a plethora of experiences and opportunities to make connections, including: our new First-Time Attendees Breakfast; morning activities like our 5k Run and meditation; evening events including the all-attendee reception at the Vancouver Aquarium; diversity events such as our inaugural Diversity in Open Source Reception and the Women in Open Source lunch; our new networking app; and much more.

Register to save $300 through June 17.

REGISTER NOW »

deep learning

The LF Deep Learning Foundation is now accepting proposals for the contribution of projects.

I am very pleased to announce that the LF Deep Learning Foundation has approved a project lifecycle and contribution process to enable the contribution, support and growth of artificial intelligence, machine learning and deep learning open source projects. With these documents in place, the LF Deep Learning Foundation is now accepting proposals for the contribution of projects.

The LF Deep Learning Foundation, a community umbrella project of The Linux Foundation with the mission of supporting artificial intelligence, machine learning and deep learning open source projects, is working to build a self-sustaining ecosystem of projects.  Having a clear roadmap for how to contribute projects is a first step. Contributed projects operate under their own technical governance with collaboration resources allocated and provided by the LF Deep Learning Foundation’s Governing Board. Membership in the LF Deep Learning Foundation is not required to propose a project contribution.

The project lifecycle and contribution process documents can be found here: https://lists.deeplearningfoundation.org/g/tac-general/wiki/Lifecycle-Document-and-Project-Proposal-Process. Note that sign-up to the general LF Deep Learning Foundation mailing list is required to access these materials.

If you are interested in contributing a project, please review the steps and requirements described in the above materials. We are very excited to see what kinds of innovative, forward-thinking projects the community creates.

If you have any questions on how to contribute a project or the types of support LF Deep Learning Foundation is providing to its projects, please reach out to me at snicholas@linuxfoundation.org.

For more information on the LF Deep Learning Foundation, please visit https://www.linuxfoundation.org/projects/deep-learning/.

building leadership

The latest Open Source Guide for the Enterprise from The TODO Group provides practical advice for building leadership in open source projects and communities.

Contributing code is just one aspect of creating a successful open source project. The open source culture is fundamentally collaborative, and active involvement in shaping a project’s direction is equally important. The path toward leadership is not always straightforward, however, so the latest Open Source Guide for the Enterprise from The TODO Group provides practical advice for building leadership in open source projects and communities.  

Being a good leader and earning trust within a community takes time and effort, and this free guide discusses various aspects of leadership within a project, including matters of governance, compliance, and culture. Building Leadership in an Open Source Community, featuring contributions from Gil Yehuda of Oath and Guy Martin of Autodesk, looks at how decisions are made, how to attract talent, when to join vs. when to create an open source project, and it offers specific approaches to becoming a good leader in open source communities.

Leadership Mindset

According to the guide, the open source leadership mindset involves:

  • Influence, not control
  • Transparency as a means of crowd-sourcing solutions, not as exposure
  • Leading, not herding

Building leadership can happen at all levels — from managers to developers to volunteers. Developers, for example, are often highly motivated to contribute to open source projects that matter to them and to build their reputations within the community. According to the guide, “open source is so hotly in demand that developers actively seek opportunities to develop or hone their open source chops.”

Guy Martin, Director, Open at Autodesk, Autodesk, says that when interviewing developers, he is frequently asked how the company will help the developer build his or her own open source brand.

Increase Visibility

“Raising your own company’s visibility in its open source work can thus also help recruit developers. Some companies even offer open source training to add to the appeal. Presenting the company’s open source projects at conferences and contributing code in communities are the best ways to raise your company’s visibility. Asking your developers to network with other developers and invite them aboard also tends to work well,” the guide states.

Read the complete guide to Building Leadership in an Open Source Community online now. And, see the list of all Open Source Guides for the Enterprise to learn more.  The information contained in these guides is based on years of experience and best practices from industry leaders. They are developed by The TODO Group in collaboration with The Linux Foundation and the larger open source community.  

open source summit

Submit your proposal to speak at Open Source Summit Europe in Edinburgh. Proposals due July 1.

Share your expertise and speak at Open Source Summit Europe in Edinburgh, October 22 – 24, 2018. We are accepting proposals through Sunday, July 1, 2018.

Open Source Summit Europe is the leading technical conference for professional open source. Join developers, sysadmins, DevOps professionals, architects and community members, to collaborate and learn about the latest open source technologies, and to gain a competitive advantage by using innovative open solutions.

As open source continues to evolve, so does the content covered at Open Source Summit. We’re excited to announce all-new tracks and content that make our conference more inclusive and feature a broader range of technologies driving open source innovation today.

This year’s tracks/content will cover the following:

  • Cloud Native Apps/Serverless/Microservices
  • Infrastructure & Automation (Cloud/Cloud Native/DevOps)
  • Artificial Intelligence & Data Analytics
  • Linux Systems
  • Open Collaboration and Diversity Empowerment
  • Emerging Open Technologies/Wildcard
  • Innovation at Apache
  • TODO/Open Source Program Management

View Full List of Suggested Topics & Submit Now >>

Get Inspired!

Watch presentations from Open Source Summit Europe 2017.

View All Open Source Summit 2017 Keynotes >>

 

LinuxCon

Check out the new keynote speakers and executive leadership track for LC3.

Attend LC3 in Beijing, June 25 – 27, 2018, and hear from Chinese and international open source experts from Accenture, China Mobile, Constellation Research, Huawei, IBM, Intel, OFO, Xturing Biotechnology and more.

New Keynote Speakers:

  • Peixin Hou, Chief Architect of Open Software and Systems in the Central Software Institute, Huawei
  • Sven Loberg, Managing Director within Accenture’s Emerging Technology practice with responsibility for Open Source and Software Innovation
  • Evan Xiao, Vice President, Strategy & Industry Development, Huawei
  • Cloud Native Computing Panel Discussion featuring panelists from Alibaba, Huawei, IBM, Microsoft and Tencent, and hosted by Dan Kohn, Executive Director, Cloud Native Computing Foundation

View Previously Announced Keynote Speakers>>

New Executive Leadership Track:

In addition to existing tracks across technology areas including AI, Blockchain, Networking, Cloud Native and more, LC3 2018 will feature a new Executive Leadership track on Tuesday, June 26, 2018, targeted at gathering executive business leaders across Chinese technology companies to collaborate, to share learnings, and to gain insights from industry leaders including:

  • R “Ray” Wang, head of Silicon Valley-based Constellation Research and best selling author of the Harvard Business Review Press book, Disrupting Digital Business, will share practical guidance on how to jump start growth with AI driven smart services
  • Dr. Feng Junlan, Director of the newly founded China Mobile Artificial Intelligence and Smart Operations R&D Center, will share insights on network intelligence, intelligent operations and China Mobile’s related strategic considerations and practice
  • Chao Wang, CTO of Xturing Biotechnology will talk about building Gene Sequencing tools by using container technology
  • Chenyu Xue, M2M Director of OFO will discuss the sharing economy how OFO implements an open source spirit into its company philosophy
  • Deep Learning Panel Discussion featuring panelists from Baidu, Didi, Huawei, IBM, Microsoft and Tencent, and hosted by Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation

These sessions will take place following the morning keynote sessions including Sven Loberg, Accenture; Evan Xiao, Huawei; and the Cloud Native Panel Discussion.

VIEW THE FULL SCHEDULE >>

REGISTER NOW >>

Need assistance convincing your manager? Here’s a letter that can help you make the request to attend LC3. Register now to save $40USD/255RMB through June 18.

参加6月25日–27日在北京召开的LC3论坛,倾听来自埃森哲、中国移动、卫星网研究、华为、IBM、英特尔、OFO、Xturing Biotechnology等中国和国际公司的开源专家的意见和建议。

新主题发言人:

  • 侯培新,中央软件研究院开源软件与系统首席架构师,华为
  • Sven Loberg,埃森哲新兴技术实践总监,负责开源和软件创新
  • Evan Xiao,战略与行业发展部门副总裁,华为
  • 云原生计算小组讨论,由来自阿里巴巴、华为、IBM、微软和腾讯的专题讨论嘉宾组成,由云本地计算基金会的执行董事 Dan Kohn 主持

查看之前公布的主题演讲者 »

新执行领导力会议:

涵盖了人工智能、区块链、网络、云原生等技术领域的现有通道之外,LC3 2018论坛将于6月26日(周二)推出一项新的高管领导力会议,旨在汇聚中国科技公司的高管业务领导者,共同分享学习经验,并分享行业领导者的见解,此会议将包括:

  • 卫星网研究(硅谷)的负责人和畅销书作者(书籍《混乱的数字化商业》,哈佛商业评论杂志社出版) R “Ray” Wang ,将分享“如何通过人工智能驱动的智能服务推动增长”的实践指导
  • 新成立的中国移动人工智能和智能运营研发中心主任冯俊兰博士,将分享“关于网络智能、智能运营和中国移动相关战略考虑与实践”的见解
  • Xturing Biotechnology的首席技术官王朝将谈谈使用容器技术构建的基因测序工具
  • OFO的M2M总监薛晨宇将探讨共享经济——“OFO 如何在公司理念中实现开源精神”
  • 深度学习小组讨论会的嘉宾来自百度,滴滴,华为,IBM,微软和腾讯,并由Linux Foundation执行总监Jim Zemlin主持

以上会议将在上午的主题演讲后举行,将包括埃森哲的Sven Loberg,、华为的Evan Xiao,以及云本地小组讨论嘉宾。

查看完整的时间表 »

立即注册 »

需要我们帮助说服您的经理?这是一封信,用以帮助您向经理提出参加 LC3 的要求。至 6 月 18 日前,立即注册可省 40 美元/255 元人民币。

Open networking summit

Submit your proposal to speak at Open Networking Summit Europe, happening September 25-27 in Amsterdam.

Open Networking Summit Europe (ONS EU) is the first combined Technical and Business Networking conference for Carriers, Cloud and Enterprises in Europe. The call for proposals for ONS EU 2018 is now open, and we invite you to share your expertise.

Based on feedback we received at Open Networking Summit North America 2018, our restructured agenda will include project-based technical sessions as well.

Share your knowledge with over 700 architects, developers, and thought leaders paving the future of network integration, acceleration and deployment. Proposals are due Sunday, June 24, 2018.

Suggested Topics:

Networking Futures: Share innovative ideas and submissions that will disrupt and change the landscape of networking, as well as networking enabled markets, in the next 3-5 years. Submissions can be for Enterprise IT, Service Providers or Cloud Markets.

Network General Sessions: Common business, architecture, process or people issues that are important to move the Networking agenda forward in the next 1-2 years.

(Technical) Service Provider & Cloud Networking: We want to hear what you have to say about the containerization of service provider workloads, multi-cloud, 5G, fog, and edge access cloud networking.

(Business & Architecture) Service Provider & Cloud Networking: We’re seeking proposals on software-defined packet-optical, mobile edge computing, 4G video/CDN, 5G networking, and incorporating legacy systems (legacy enterprise workload migration, role of networking in cloud migration, and interworking of carrier OSS/BSS/FCAPS systems).

Submit a Talk >>

Get Inspired!

Watch presentations from Open Networking Summit North America 2018

Open Data

NOAA is working to make all of its data available to an even wider group of people and make it more easily understood (Image: NOAA).

The goal of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is to put all of its data — data about weather, climate, ocean coasts, fisheries, and ecosystems – into the hands of the people who need it most. The trick is translating the hard data and making it useful to people who aren’t necessarily subject matter experts, said Edward Kearns, the NOAA’s first ever data officer, speaking at the recent Open Source Leadership Summit (OSLS).  

NOAA’s mission is similar to NASA’s in that it is science based, but “our mission is operations; to get the quality information to the American people that they need to run their businesses, to protect their lives and property, to manage their water resources, to manage their ocean resources,” said Kearns, during his talk titled “Realizing the Full Potential of NOAA’s Open Data.”

He said that NOAA was doing Big Data long before the term was coined and that the agency has way too much of it – to the tune of 30 petabytes in its archives with another 200 petabytes of data in a working data store. Not surprisingly, NOAA officials have a hard time moving it around and managing it, Kearns said.

Data Sharing

NOAA is a big consumer of open source and sharing everything openly is part of the organization’s modus operandi. On a global level, “the agency has been a leader for the entire United States in trying to broker data sharing among countries,” Kearns said. One of the most successful examples has been through the United Nations, with an organization called World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

Agency officials have a tendency to default making their products accessible in the public domain, something Kearns said he’d like to change. By adopting some modern licensing practices, he believes the NOAA could actually share even more information with the public. “The Linux Foundation has made progress on the community data license agreement. This is one the things I’d like to possibly consider adopting for our organization,’’ he added.

One of the great success stories the NOAA has in terms of getting critical data to the public was after Hurricane Irma hit Florida in September 2017, he said.

“As you can imagine, there were a lot of American citizens that were hungry for information and were hitting the NOAA websites very hard and data sites very hard,’’ he said. “Typically, we have a hard time keeping up with that kind of demand.” The National Hurricane Center is part of the NOAA, and the agency took the NHC’s website and put it on Amazon Cloud.

This gave the agency the ability to handle over a billion hits a day during the peak hurricane season. But, he continued, “we are still … just starting to get into how to adopt some of these more modern technologies to do our job better.”

Equal Access

Now the NOAA is looking to find a way to make the data available to an even wider group of people and make it more easily understood. Those are their two biggest challenges: how to disseminate data and how to help people understand it, Kearns said.

“We’re getting hammered every day by a lot of companies that want the data… and we have to make sure everybody’s got an equal chance of getting the data,” he said.

This is becoming a harder job because demand is growing exponentially, he said. “Our costs are going up because we need more servers, we need more networks,” and it’s a problem due to budget constraints.

The agency decided that partnering with industry would help facilitate the delivery of data.

The NOAA is going into the fourth year of a deal it signed with Amazon, Microsoft, IBM, Google, and a nonprofit out of the University of the Chicago called the Open Commons Consortium (OCC), Kearns said. The agreement is that NOAA data will remain free and open and the OCC will host it at no cost to taxpayers and monetize services around the data.

The agency is using an academic partner acting as a data broker to help it “flip this data and figure out how to drop it into all of our collaborators’ cloud platforms, and they turn it around and serve many consumers from that,” Kearns explained. “We went from a one-to-many, to a one-to-a-few, to a many model of distribution.”

People trust NOAA’s data today because they get it from a NOAA data service, he said. Now the agency is asking them to trust the NOAA data that exists outside the federal system on a partner system.

On AWS alone the NOAA has seen an improvement of over two times the number of people who are using the data, he said. The agency in turn, has seen a 50 percent reduction in hits on the NOAA servers.

Google has loaded a lot of the agency’s climate data to its BigQuery data warehouse, “and they’ve been able to move petabytes of this data just in a few months, just because the data now has been loaded into a tool people are already using.”

This “reduces that obstacle of understanding,’’ Kearns noted. “You don’t have to understand a scientific data format, you can go right into BigQuery… and do analyses.”

Data Trust

Being able to trust data is also an important component of any shared initiative, and through the NOAA’s Big Data Project, the agency is seeking ways of ensuring that the trust that comes with the NOAA brand is conveyed with the data, he said, so people continue to trust it as they use it.  

“We have a very proud history of this open data leadership, we’re continuing on that path, and we’re trying to see how we can amplify that,’’ Kearns said.

NOAA officials are now wondering if the data is being made available through these modern cloud platforms will make it easier for users to create information products for themselves and their customers.

“Of course, we’re also looking for other ways of just doing our business better,’’ he added. But they want to figure out if it makes sense to continue this experiment with its partners. That, he said, they will likely know by early next year.

Watch the complete presentation below:

linux kernel developer

Linux kernel developer Steven Rostedt maintains the Real Time Stable releases of the Linux kernel.

Linus Torvalds recently released version 4.16 of the Linux kernel. These releases typically occur every nine to ten weeks, and each one contains the work of more than 1,600 developers representing over 200 corporations, according to the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report, written by Jonathan Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman. In this series, we’re highlighting some of the developers who contribute to the kernel.

Steven Rostedt, Open Source Programmer at VMware, maintains the Real Time Stable releases of the Linux kernel, among other things. Rostedt is one of the original developers of the PREEMPT_RT patch and began working on it in 2004 with the goal of turning Linux into a real-time designed operating system. He is also the main author, developer, and maintainer of Ftrace, a tool designed to help developers find what is going on inside the kernel. According to the Ftrace wiki, the tool can be used for debugging or analyzing latencies and performance issues that take place outside of user-space.

Linux kernel dev

Steven Rostedt

Additionally, this past year, Rostedt found time to speak at various events and serve on The Linux Foundation’s technical advisory board. Here are Rostedt’s responses to our questions.

Linux Foundation: What role do you play in the community and what subsystem(s) do you work on?

Steven Rostedt: I partake in a lot of the Linux Foundation events as well as Kernel Recipes, Linux Plumbers, sometimes Linux Tag and other events. I’m on The Linux Foundation’s Technical Advisory Board (TAB) and was on the Linux Plumbers programming committee. I’m an Open Source advocate and try to communicate to people what that means. I maintain the Real Time Stable releases, and the Ftrace (Linux kernel tracer) subsystem, as well as ktest, localmodconfig, and Ftrace tools like trace-cmd and KernelShark.

Linux Foundation: What have you been working on this year? / What’s one way you have contributed to the 4.8 to 4.13 releases?

Rostedt: I’ve been working on having ftrace trace init functions in both the main kernel core as well as in modules. Between 4.8 and 4.13, I rewrote the function tracing trigger code to be able to be expanded and used to enable function filtering for tracing on modules before they are loaded.

Linux Foundation:  What do you think the kernel community needs to work on in the upcoming year?

Rostedt: I think more focus should be on eBPF and helping it be easier to use as well as having an eye on security. Running a VM within the kernel can be very dangerous, and people need to use caution and be extra careful during development.

Linux Foundation: Why do you contribute to the Linux kernel?

Rostedt: Because it is the one place that you have total control over your computer.

At the recent Embedded Linux Conference, Rostedt presented a session on “Maintaining a Real Time Stable Kernel,” in which he explained what’s required to maintain a stable RT tree, which is a bit different from maintaining a normal stable tree. In this talk, he covered various tools that can be used and described the current tests performed to ensure that the RT stable kernel is fully functional.

You can learn more about the Linux kernel development process and read more developer profiles in the full report. Download the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report now.

open source project

Matt Butcher provides tips for managing open source projects based on experience with Kubernetes Helm.

As open source technology has become more strategically important for organizations everywhere, many tech workers are choosing to or being asked to build out and oversee their own open source projects. From Google, to Netflix to Facebook, companies are also releasing their open source creations to the community. These efforts require more management than may seem apparent at first, and there is also a particular kind of “nice problem to have” that can arise. Specifically, a new open source project can suddenly take on a life of its own, growing far faster than ever imagined.

That nice problem to have was the subject of an Open Source Summit 2017 session presented by Matt Butcher, Principal Software Development Engineer at Microsoft. We covered some of his advice for open source projects in a previous post. And, here, we discuss specific project management issues Butcher has faced.

In his talk, Butcher cited examples from the Kubernetes Helm project, which grew to involve hundreds of contributors and thousands of active users in a span of 18 months..

Minefields and sparring matches

One thing Butcher and his collaborators on the Helm project learned is that managing governance and standards is an ongoing challenge. They also learned that code reviews can become “minefields of interaction,” where community members may have unexpected motives behind their messages. “I have been involved in situations where code reviews become a sparring match,” said Butcher.

“With Helm, we developed guidelines for them. They can develop in such a way that some people will just want to weigh in and show that they’re right. In some cases it’s very important to acknowledge contributions We actually have an internal rule in our core maintainers guide that says, ‘Make sure that at least one comment that you leave on a code review, if you’re asking for changes, is a positive one. It sounds really juvenile, right? But it serves a specific purpose. It lets somebody know, ‘I acknowledge that you just made a gift of your time and your resources,” he said.

Shifting perspective

Butcher also noted that team dynamics can change quickly as internal focus shifts to external focus. “At some point you’re going to release your project out into the wild, and then you’ll hit your stability marker, which might be, say, your version 1.0,” he said. “At that point your perspective changes and you say, ‘Hey, instead of huddling together to work on our team dynamics, we’re all going to face outward. That can be a touchy border to be on.”

In the case of Helm, team members reached out in unexpected ways during the early growth phase. “We did some crazy stuff when we were launching it,” Butcher said. “We actually had kind of an internal semi-formal policy that you would pair with people who came in and had big problems, which resulted in random people from the team joining meetings with people they’d never met and saying, ‘Hey, tell me about your problem and let me see if I can help.’  The whole point of this was to try and actively pull people into the community and get them engaged right away.”

Timelines are guidelines

Butcher stressed that project managers should “know what they’re building and be ruthless about sticking to it.” That means, in some cases, that timelines are guidelines. “You want to commit to timelines, because that’s respectful to the community,” he said. “On the flip side, you also are trying to keep your core contributors motivated. You don’t want them to feel undue pressure. In many cases the community understands that you are at the liberty of the contributors and sometimes something does come up. At times, we had to go back to the community and say, ‘we couldn’t do it because the Kubernetes team isn’t ready for us yet, so we’re going to have to wait a little while.”

You can learn more about open source project management in The Linux Foundation’s growing collection of Open Source Guides for the Enterprise. These free online guides cover starting an open source project, improving your open source impact, participating in open source communities, and more.

Share your knowledge and expertise at Open Source Summit North Americahappening August 29-31 in Vancouver BC. Proposals are being accepted through April 29th.