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Learn how to align your goals for managing and creating open source software with your organization’s business objectives using the tips and proven practices from the TODO Group.

The majority of companies using open source understand its business value, but they may lack the tools to strategically implement an open source program and reap the full rewards. According to a recent survey from The New Stack, “the top three benefits of open source programs are 1) increased awareness of open source, 2) more speed and agility in the development cycle, and 3) better license compliance.”

Running an open source program office involves creating a strategy to help you define and implement your approach as well as measure your progress. The Open Source Guides to the Enterprise, developed by The Linux Foundation in partnership with the TODO Group, offer open source expertise based on years of experience and practice.

The most recent guide, Setting an Open Source Strategy, details the essential steps in creating a strategy and setting you on the path to success. According to the guide, “your open source strategy connects the plans for managing, participating in, and creating open source software with the business objectives that the plans serve. This can open up many opportunities and catalyze innovation.” The guide covers the following topics:

  1. Why create a strategy?
  2. Your strategy document
  3. Approaches to strategy
  4. Key considerations
  5. Other components
  6. Determine ROI
  7. Where to invest

The critical first step here is creating and documenting your open source strategy, which will “help you maximize the benefits your organization gets from open source.” At the same time, your detailed strategy can help you avoid difficulties that may arise from mistakes such as choosing the wrong license or improperly maintaining code. According to the guide, this document can also:

  • Get leaders excited and involved
  • Help obtain buy-in within the company
  • Facilitate decision-making in diffuse, multi-departmental organizations
  • Help build a healthy community
  • Explain your company’s approach to open source and support of its use
  • Clarify where your company invests in community-driven, external R&D and where your company will focus on its value added differentiation

“At Salesforce, we have internal documents that we circulate to our engineering team, providing strategic guidance and encouragement around open source. These encourage the creation and use of open source, letting them know in no uncertain terms that the strategic leaders at the company are fully behind it. Additionally, if there are certain kinds of licenses we don’t want engineers using, or other open source guidelines for them, our internal documents need to be explicit,” said Ian Varley, Software Architect at Salesforce and contributor to the guide.

Open source programs help promote an enterprise culture that can make companies more productive, and, according to the guide, a strong strategy document can “help your team understand the business objectives behind your open source program, ensure better decision-making, and minimize risks.”  

Learn how to align your goals for managing and creating open source software with your organization’s business objectives using the tips and proven practices in the new guide to Setting an Open Source Strategy. And, check out all 12 Open Source Guides for the Enterprise for more information on achieving success with open source.

open source

Guy Martin, Director, Open@Autodesk, explains how Autodesk consumes and contributes to open source.

Companies today can’t get away with not using open source, says Guy Martin, Director, Open@Autodesk, who recently sat down with us for a deep dive into Autodesk’s engagement with and contributions to the open source community.

Guy Martin

Guy Martin, Director, Open@Autodesk

“Like any company… we consume a lot of open source,” said Martin, “I was brought in to help Autodesk’s open source strategy in terms of how we contribute back more effectively to open source, how we open source code within our environment, which we want to be a standard — code which is non-differentiating and not strategic IP.”

One of the things that Martin is most proud of is the work his company is doing in the film and media space.

“We have contributed to projects like Universal Scene Description (USD) and OpenColorIO to help our film and media customers utilize not only our products but also products from other companies through the combination of open source software,” said Martin. This leads to a typical open source ecosystem that allows film and media companies to mix and match solutions from different vendors.

In addition to contributing to various open source projects, the company has also open sourced some of its own projects. Autodesk’s GitHub repository currently has more than 51 projects.

Process and planning

But it’s not easy for a large company like Autodesk to engage with the open source community. Because they also have industry-leading proprietary solutions, they need to be extra careful with consuming and contributing to open source. They need to understand various licenses to avoid legal complexity, and they must be aware that releasing some code may also expose company IP.  These are areas where all companies must tread carefully, and developers need to be fully confident that they can use code efficiently without dealing with a heavyweight process to get permissions for using or contributing.

“There needs to be a process around what we are going to open source which involves legal at a very early stage,” Martin said.

When Martin started working at Autodesk, he sat down with the legal department and found that one of the challenges in open sourcing code was lack of any business strategy around the process. One team might decide to open source something, start discussing with legal, then after a few months or more of all this work someone from business unit might look at it and ask why are we open sourcing this? All the previous efforts would be wasted.

Strategic value

“Now the process starts with the business team. We engage the business leaders; we engage the engineering teams. When we decide to open source something, we ask what’s the strategic value for Autodesk in open sourcing. What do we gain and what do we lose regarding the ability to patent things. These are the genuine business concerns,” he said.

Beyond open sourcing their own code, legal also needs to get involved when it comes to using (or contributing to) external open source projects. Before Martin joined the company, Autodesk had many different ways and means for getting approval to contribute something to upstream open source or consume some open source project.

Martin worked with the open source legal counsel at the company to fix the process. “Now we have a single process for anyone who wants to consume some open source code or wants to contribute to some. We are still improving that process,” he said.

Another thing that Autodesk has done is create a whitelist of pre-approved open source licenses, so developers have more freedom and flexibility. There is still some oversight from legal in case there is something they are not comfortable with. “We still have to track that work from a compliance perspective, but it does lift the burden from developers,” said Martin.

Autodesk has also implemented more communication channels internally, which leads to more transparency across the company. This helps people understand the value of contributing to as well as consuming open source.

The influence of open source software on every aspect of business has been on the rise for years, and it should come as no surprise that its influence during merger and acquisition (M&A) transactions has grown as well. In particular, open source audits are part of required due diligence in M&A or initial public offering (IPO) processes. Not only do such audits highlight potential instances of copyright infringement, but they give buyers and investors a landscape view of important open source components in their target’s technology stack.

These issues and more are covered in-depth in a new ebook, Open Source Audits in Merger and Acquisition Transactions, from Ibrahim Haddad and The Linux Foundation, which provides an overview of the open source audit process and highlights important considerations for code compliance, preparation, and documentation.

Today’s software products and technology stacks incorporate many open source components, and the implementation of these components can mean complex licensing and inter-dependency issues.  Part of the goal with a proper source code audit is to avoid unpleasant surprises post-acquisition. Source code scanning tools have the ability to discover and match snippets of open source code that have been incorporated within software tools and platforms. In addition, these tools can identify modifications to open source code that developers may have deployed.

“Every M&A transaction is different, but the need to verify the impact of acquiring open source obligations is a constant,” writes Haddad. “Open source audits are carried out to understand the depth of use and the reliance on open source software. Additionally, they offer great insights about any compliance issues and even about the target’s engineering practices.”

Haddad also notes that open source audits can expose obligations. “Open source licenses usually impose certain obligations that must be fulfilled when code is distributed,” he notes. “One example is the GNU General Public License (GNU GPL), which requires derivatives or combinations to be made available under the same license as well. Other licenses require certain notices in documentation or have restrictions for how the product is promoted.”

According to Haddad, there are three common types of open source audits that are performed in M&A situations:

  1. Traditional audit, in which the auditor gets complete access to all the code and executes the audit either remotely or on site.
  2. Blind audit, in which the auditor does the work remotely and without ever seeing the source code.
  3. “Do It Yourself” audit, where the target company or the acquirer performs most of the actual audit work themselves using the tools with the option for a random verification of results from the auditing company.

Is a merger and acquisition scenario the only time an organization should consider an open source audit? No, regular audits can provide much value, and companies such as Black Duck Software have specialized in doing them in many types of business scenarios. “While it’s undeniable that an open source audit is essential before any successful M&A or IPO, it’s no less important as part of a software team’s regular operations,” notes a blog post from White Source Software. “Put it this way, if you have license compliance or security issues affecting your open source components, isn’t it better to identify and deal with those issues sooner rather than later?”

Many important issues arise during audits, including potential security threats and lapses in version control. Everything you need to know, including recommended practices and mistakes to avoid, can be found in this ebook.

Download the ebook now.

OSLS

Keynote speakers announced for The Linux Foundation Open Source Leadership Summit.

The Linux Foundation Open Source Leadership Summit is the premier forum for open source leaders to convene to drive digital transformation with open source technologies and learn how to collaboratively manage the largest shared technology investment of our time.

Confirmed keynote speakers and panelists for this year’s event include:

  • Deepak Agarwal, VP of Artificial Intelligence at LinkedIn
  • Subbu Allamaraju, VP of Technology, Expedia
  • Dustin Bennett, Software Engineer Sr. Manager, The Home Depot
  • Austen Collins, Founder & CEO, Serverless Inc.
  • Justin Dean, SVP Platform & TechOps, Ticketmaster
  • Ashley Eckard, Sr. Software Engineer, The Home Depot
  • Dr. Mazin Gilbert, Vice President of Advanced Technology, AT&T Labs
  • Chen Goldberg, Director of Engineering, Google Cloud
  • Nidhi Gupta, SVP of Engineering, Hired
  • Patrick Heim, Operating Partner & CISO, ClearSky Security
  • John M. Jack, Board Partner, Andreessen Horowitz and Advisor to The Linux Foundation
  • Edward Kearns, Chief Data Officer, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
  • Marten Mickos, CEO, HackerOne
  • Mark Russinovich, CTO, Microsoft Azure, Microsoft
  • Tarry Singh, Author, AI, ML & Deep Learning Executive, and Deep Learning Mentor, Coursera
  • Aaron Symanski, Chief Technology Officer, Change Healthcare
  • Rachel Thomas, Co-Founder, Fast.ai
  • Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation

Open Source Leadership Summit fosters innovation, growth, and partnerships among the leading projects and corporations working in open technology development. Business and technical leaders will gather at the summit to advance open source strategy, implementation and investment.

Here’s How To Join Us at Open Source Leadership Summit:

Speak

Are you a business or technical leader looking to advance open source strategy, implementation and investment? Join us and share your expertise at Open Source Leadership Summit. View the full list of suggested topics and submit a proposal by 11:59pm PST on Sunday, January 21, 2018.  

Attend

Attendance to Open Source Leadership Summit is limited to members of The Linux Foundation and LF Hosted Projects, as well as media, speakers and sponsors. If you are a member, and would like to attend, email us at events@linuxfoundation.org.  For media attendance inquiries, email Dan Brown at dbrown@linuxfoundation.org.

Sponsor

Showcase your thought leadership among a vibrant open source community and connect with top influencers driving today’s technology purchasing decisions. Learn how to become a sponsor.

Open Source Leadership Summit

Share your knowledge, best practices, and strategies at Open Source Leadership Summit.

Open Source Leadership Summit (OSLS) is an invitation-only think tank where open source software and collaborative development thought leaders convene, discuss best practices, and learn how to manage today’s largest shared technology investments.

The Linux Foundation invites you to share your knowledge, best practices, and strategies with fellow open source leaders at OSLS.  

Tracks & Suggested Topics for Open Source Leadership Summit:

OS Program Office

  • Consuming and Contributing to Open Source
  • Driving Participation and Inclusiveness in Open Source Projects
  • Standards and Open Source
  • Managing Competing Corporate Interests while Driving Coherent Communities
  • How to Vet the Viability of OS Projects
  • Open Source + Startup Business Models
  • Project Planning and Strategy
  • Internal vs. External Developer Adoption

Best Practices in Open Source Development / Lessons Learned

  • Contribution Policies
  • Promoting Your Open Source Project
  • Open Source Best Practices
  • Open Source Program Office Case Studies and Success Stories
  • Standards and Open Source

Growing & Sustaining Project Communities / Metrics and Actions Taken

  • Collaboration Models to Address Security Issues
  • Metrics for Understanding Project Health

Automating Compliance / Gaps & Successes

  • Using Trademarks in Open Communities
  • Working with Regulators / Regulated Industries
  • Working with the Government on OS
  • How to Incorporate SPDX Identifiers in Your Project
  • Legal + Compliance
  • Licensing + Patents
  • Successfully Working Upstream & Downstream

Certifying Open Source Projects

  • Security
  • Safety
  • Export
  • Government Restrictions
  • Open Source vs. Open Governance
  • New Frontiers for Open Source in FinTech and Healthcare

Futures

  • Upcoming Trends
  • R&D via Open Source
  • Sustainability

Business Leadership

  • Cultivating Open Source Leadership
  • How to Run a Business that Relies on Open Source
  • How to be an Effective Board Member
  • How to Invest in Your Project’s Success
  • Managing Competing Corporate Interests while Driving Coherent Communities
  • Monetizing Open Source & Innovators Dilemma

View here for more details on suggested topics, and submit your proposal before the Jan. 21 deadline.

Get inspired! Watch keynotes from Open Source Leadership Summit 2017.

See all keynotes from OSLS 2017 »

This free guide can help you increase your development team’s efficacy through and with open source contributions.

Open source programs are sparking innovation at organizations of all types, and if your program is up and running, you may have arrived at the point where maximizing the impact of your development is essential to continued success. Many open source program managers are now required to demonstrate the ROI of their technology development, and example open source report cards from Facebook and Google track development milestones.

This is where the new, free Improving Your Open Source Development Impact guide can help. The aim of the guide is to help you increase your development team’s efficacy through and with open source contributions. By implementing some of the best practices laid out in the guide, you can:

  • Reduce the amount of work needed from product teams
  • Minimize the cost to maintain source code and internal software branches
  • Improve code quality
  • Produce faster development cycles
  • Produce more stable code to serve as the base for products
  • Improve company reputation in key open source communities.

Open source development requires a different approach than many organizations are accustomed to. But the work becomes easier if you have a clear plan to follow. Fortunately, a whole lot of companies and individuals have already forged a path to success in contributing to significant open source projects. They have tried and true methods for establishing a leadership role in open source communities.

This open source guide offers lessons for increasing open source development impact through specific examples. Contributing to the Linux kernel is one of the hardest challenges for open source developers. With that in mind, the guide uses this case as an example, but the lessons learned will apply to nearly any open source project you’ll work with.

“It took us years of constant discussion and negotiation to break from the traditional IT setup into a more flexible environment that supports our open source development,” said Ibrahim Haddad, Vice President of R&D and Head of the Open Source Group at Samsung Research. “We made it work for us and with enough persistence you also can make it work for your open source team.”

Common Challenges

Notably, organizations run into common problems as they try to improve the impact of their open source inventions. The figure below shows some of the challenges that dedicated open source teams face in an enterprise setting.open source guidesThe Improving Your Open Source Development Impact guide can help you navigate these and other common open source-related challenges. It covers everything from evaluating ROI to optimizing practices, and it explores how to seamlessly and safely leverage existing tools to complement your open source creations.

It is one of a new collection of free guides from The Linux Foundation and The TODO Group providing valuable insight and expertise for any organization running an open source program. The guides are available now to help you run an open source program office where open source is supported, shared, and leveraged.

Check out the all the guides, and don’t miss the previous articles in the series:

How to Create an Open Source Program

Tools for Managing Open Source Programs

Measuring Your Open Source Program’s Success

Effective Strategies for Recruiting Open Source Developers

Participating in Open Source Communities

Using Open Source Code

Launching an Open Source Project: A Free Guide

openchain

OpenChain makes open source compliance more predictable, understandable, and efficient for all participants in the software supply chain.

Communities form in open source all the time to address challenges. The majority of these communities are based around code, but others cover topics as diverse as design or governance. The OpenChain Project is a great example of the latter. What began three years ago as a conversation about reducing overlap, confusion, and wasted resources with respect to open source compliance is now poised to become an industry standard.

The idea to develop an overarching standard to describe what organizations could and should do to address open source compliance efficiently gained momentum until the formal project was born. The basic idea was simple: identify key recommended processes for effective open source management. The goal was equally clear: reduce bottlenecks and risk when using third-party code to make open source license compliance simple and consistent across the supply chain. The key was to pull things together in a manner that balanced comprehensiveness, broad applicability, and real-world usability.

Main Pillars of the Project

The OpenChain Project has three pillars supported by dedicated work teams. The OpenChain Specification defines a core set of requirements every quality compliance program must satisfy. OpenChain Conformance allows organizations to display their adherence to these requirements. The OpenChain Curriculum provides the educational foundation for open source processes and solutions, while meeting a key requirement of the OpenChain Specification. The result is that open source license compliance becomes more predictable, understandable, and efficient for all participants in the software supply chain.

Reasons to Engage

The OpenChain Project is designed to be useful and adoptable for all types of entities in the supply chain. As such, it is important to distill its value proposition for various potential partners. Our volunteer community created a list of five practical reasons to engage:

  1. OpenChain makes free and open source software (FOSS) more accessible to your developers. OpenChain provides a framework for shared, compliant use of FOSS. Conforming companies create an environment that supports use of FOSS internally and sharing of FOSS with partners.
  2. OpenChain reduces overall compliance effort, saving time and legal and engineering resources. OpenChain allows companies in a supply chain to work together toward FOSS compliance and provides a consistent standard to which all must perform. By contrast, in a typical supply chain, each member of the chain has to perform FOSS compliance for software of others in the chain, wasting time and resources in a duplication of effort.
  3. OpenChain may be adapted to your existing systems. OpenChain allows you to choose your own processes to meet its requirements. OpenChain provides resources that help you design new processes from the ground up, or you may choose to use the systems you have in place.
  4. OpenChain helps your business teams work together toward a common goal. OpenChain provides a blueprint for your legal, engineering, and business teams to work together toward FOSS compliance.
  5. OpenChain allows you to conform to a stable, community-backed specification. When you adopt OpenChain, you conform to a stable specification that is widely backed by industry and community participants. OpenChain was developed in an open, collaborative process, with contributors from a wide range of industries across Asia, Europe and North America. OpenChain is being formally adopted by a growing number of both small and larger companies.

Today, the OpenChain Project is addressing its goals and moving towards wider market adoption with the support of 14 Platinum members: Adobe, Arm, Cisco, Comcast, GitHub, Harman, Hitachi, HPE, Qualcomm, Siemens, Sony, Toyota, Western Digital, and Wind River. The project also has a broad community of volunteers helping to make open source compliance easier for a multitude of market segments. As we move into 2018, the OpenChain Project is well positioned for adoption by Tier 1, Tier 2, and Tier 3 suppliers in multiple sectors, ranging from embedded to mobile to automotive to enterprise to infrastructure.

Entities of all sizes are welcome to participate in the OpenChain Project. Everyone is welcome and encouraged to join our mailing list at:

https://lists.linuxfoundation.org/mailman/listinfo/openchain

You can also send private email to the Project Director, Shane Coughlan, at coughlan@linux.com.

Autodesk is undergoing a company-wide shift to open source and inner source. And that’s on top of the culture change that both development methods require.

Autodesk is undergoing a company-wide shift to open source and inner source. And that’s on top of the culture change that both development methods require.

Inner source means applying open source development practices and methodologies to internal projects, even if the projects are proprietary. And the culture change required to be successful can be a hard shift from a traditional corporate hierarchy to an open approach. Even though they’re connected, all three changes are distinct heavy lifts.

They began by hiring Guy Martin as Director of Open Source Strategy in the Engineering Practice at Autodesk, which was designed to transform engineering across the company. Naturally, open source would play a huge role in that effort, including spurring the use of inner source. But neither would flourish if the company culture didn’t change. And so the job title swiftly evolved to Director of Open @ADSK at the company.

“I tend to focus a lot more on the culture change and the inner source part of my role even though I’m working through a huge compliance initiative right now on the open source side,” Martin said.

The history of Autodesk’s open source transformation began shortly after the shift of all its products to cloud began, including its AutoCAD architecture software, building information modeling with its Revit products, as well as  its media and entertainment products. The company’s role in open source in entertainment is now so significant that Martin often speaks at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences on open source. They want to hear about what  Autodesk is doing as part of a larger collection of initiatives that the Academy is working on, Martin said.

At Autodesk, the goal is to spring engineers loose from their business silos and create a fully open source, cloud-centric company.

“Your primary identity detaches from being part of the AutoCAD team or part of the Revit team, or the 3ds Max or Inventor team or any of these products,” Martin explained. “It’s now shaping you into part of the Autodesk engineering team, and not your individual silo as a product organization in the company.”

Talent acquisition is among the top business goals for Open@Autodesk, especially given the company’s intense focus on innovation as well as making all of its products work seamlessly together. It takes talent skilled in open source methodologies and thinking to help make that happen. But it also means setting up the team dynamics so collaboration is more natural and less forced.

“With company cultures and some engineering cultures, the freedom to take an unconventional route to solve a problem doesn’t exist,” Martin said. “A lot of my job is to create that freedom so that smart and motivated engineers can figure out a way to put things together in a way that maybe they wouldn’t have thought of without that freedom and that culture.”

To help create an open source culture, the right tools must be in place and, oddly enough, those tools sometimes aren’t open source. For example, Martin created a single instance of Slack rather than use IRC, because Slack was more comfortable for users in other lines of the business who were already using it. The intent was to get teams to start talking across their organizational boundaries.

Another tool Martin is working with is Bitergia Analytics to monitor and manage Autodesk’s use of GitHub Enterprise.

Martin says the three key lessons he’s learned as an open source program manager are:

  1. Stay flexible because change happens
  2. Be humble but bold
  3. Be passionate.

“I’ve been at Autodesk two years but I’m still bootstrapping some of the things around culture. We have strong contributors in some projects, while in some projects we’re consuming. I think you have to do both, especially if you’re bootstrapping a new open source effort in a company. ”

“The challenge is always balancing the needs of the product teams, who have to get a product out the door, and who (and as an engineer I can say this) will take shortcuts whenever possible. They want to know, ‘why should we be doing this for the community? All we care about is our stuff.’ And it’s getting them past that. Yes, we’re doing work that’s going to be used elsewhere, but in the end we’re going to get benefits from pulling work from other people who have done work that they knew was going to be used in the community.”

participating in open source

The Linux Foundation’s free online guide Participating in Open Source Communities can help organizations successfully navigate open source waters.

As companies in and out of the technology industry move to advance their open source programs, they are rapidly learning about the value of participating in open source communities. Organizations are using open source code to build their own commercial products and services, which drives home the strategic value of contributing back to projects.

However, diving in and participating without an understanding of projects and their communities can lead to frustration and other unfortunate outcomes. Approaching open source contributions without a strategy can tarnish a company’s reputation in the open source community and incur legal risks.

The Linux Foundation’s free online guide Participating in Open Source Communities can help organizations successfully navigate these open source waters. The detailed guide covers what it means to contribute to open source as an organization and what it means to be a good corporate citizen. It explains how open source projects are structured, how to contribute, why it’s important to devote internal developer resources to participation, as well as why it’s important to create a strategy for open source participation and management.

One of the most important first steps is to rally leadership behind your community participation strategy. “Support from leadership and acknowledgement that open source is a business critical part of your strategy is so important,” said Nithya Ruff, Senior Director, Open Source Practice at Comcast. “You should really understand the company’s objectives and how to enable them in your open source strategy.”

Building relationships is good strategy

The guide also notes that building relationships at events can make a difference, and that including community members early and often is a good strategy. “Some organizations make the mistake of developing big chunks of code in house and then dumping them into the open source project, which is almost never seen as a positive way to engage with the community,” the guide notes. “The reality is that open source projects can be complex, and what seems like an obvious change might have far reaching side effects in other parts of the project.”

Through the guide, you can also learn how to navigate issues of influence in community participation. It can be challenging for organizations to understand how influence is earned within open source projects. “Just because your organization is a big deal, doesn’t mean that you should expect to be treated like one without earning the respect of the open source community,” the guide advises.

The Participating in Open Source Communities guide can help you with these strategies and more, and it explores how to weave community focus into your open source initiatives. It is one of a new collection of free guides from The Linux Foundation and The TODO Group that provide essential information for any organization running an open source program. The guides are available now to help you run an open source program office where open source is supported, shared, and leveraged. With such an office, organizations can efficiently establish and execute on their open source strategies.

These guides were produced based on expertise from open source leaders. Check out the guides and stay tuned for our continuing coverage.

Don’t miss the previous articles in the series:

How to Create an Open Source Program

Tools for Managing Open Source Programs

Measuring Your Open Source Program’s Success

Effective Strategies for Recruiting Open Source Developers

 

Open Source Summit livestream

The Linux Foundation is pleased to offer free live video streaming of all keynote sessions at Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference Europe, Oct. 23 to Oct. 25, 2017.

Join 2000 technologists and community members next week as they convene at Open Source Summit Europe and Embedded Linux Conference Europe in Prague. If you can’t be there in person, you can still take part, as The Linux Foundation is pleased to offer free live video streaming of all keynote sessions on Monday, Oct. 23 through Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017.  So, you can watch the event keynotes presented by Google, Intel, and VMware, among others.

The livestream will begin on Monday, Oct. 23 at 9 a.m. CEST (Central European Summer Time). Sign up now! You can also follow our live event updates on Twitter with #OSSummit.

All keynotes will be broadcasted live, including talks by Keila Banks, 15-year-old Programmer, Web Designer, and Technologist with her father Philip Banks; Mitchell Hashimoto, Founder, HashiCorp Founder of HashiCorp and Creator of Vagrant, Packer, Serf, Consul, Terraform, Vault and Nomad; Jan Kizska, Senior Key Expert, Siemens AG; Dirk Hohndel, VP & Chief Open Source Officer, VMware in a Conversation with Linux and Git Creator Linus Torvalds; Michael Dolan, Vice President of Strategic Programs & The Linux Foundation; and Jono Bacon, Community/Developer Strategy Consultant and Author.

Other featured conference keynotes include:

  • Neha Narkhede — Co-Founder & CTO of Confluent will discuss Apache Kafka and the Rise of the Streaming Platform
  • Reuben Paul — 11-year-old Hacker, CyberShaolin Founder and cybersecurity ambassador will talk about how Hacking is Child’s Play
  • Arpit Joshipura — General Manager, Networking, The Linux Foundation who will discuss Open Source Networking and a Vision of Fully Automated Networks
  • Imad Sousou — Vice President and General Manager, Software & Services Group, Intel
  • Sarah Novotny — Head of Open Source Strategy for GCP, Google
  • And more

View the full schedule of keynotes.

And sign up now for the free live video stream.

Once you sign up to watch the event keynotes, you’ll be able to view the livestream on the same page. If you sign up prior to the livestream day/time, simply return to this page and you’ll be able to view.