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Learn how to align your goals for managing and creating open source software with your organization’s business objectives using the tips and proven practices from the TODO Group.

The majority of companies using open source understand its business value, but they may lack the tools to strategically implement an open source program and reap the full rewards. According to a recent survey from The New Stack, “the top three benefits of open source programs are 1) increased awareness of open source, 2) more speed and agility in the development cycle, and 3) better license compliance.”

Running an open source program office involves creating a strategy to help you define and implement your approach as well as measure your progress. The Open Source Guides to the Enterprise, developed by The Linux Foundation in partnership with the TODO Group, offer open source expertise based on years of experience and practice.

The most recent guide, Setting an Open Source Strategy, details the essential steps in creating a strategy and setting you on the path to success. According to the guide, “your open source strategy connects the plans for managing, participating in, and creating open source software with the business objectives that the plans serve. This can open up many opportunities and catalyze innovation.” The guide covers the following topics:

  1. Why create a strategy?
  2. Your strategy document
  3. Approaches to strategy
  4. Key considerations
  5. Other components
  6. Determine ROI
  7. Where to invest

The critical first step here is creating and documenting your open source strategy, which will “help you maximize the benefits your organization gets from open source.” At the same time, your detailed strategy can help you avoid difficulties that may arise from mistakes such as choosing the wrong license or improperly maintaining code. According to the guide, this document can also:

  • Get leaders excited and involved
  • Help obtain buy-in within the company
  • Facilitate decision-making in diffuse, multi-departmental organizations
  • Help build a healthy community
  • Explain your company’s approach to open source and support of its use
  • Clarify where your company invests in community-driven, external R&D and where your company will focus on its value added differentiation

“At Salesforce, we have internal documents that we circulate to our engineering team, providing strategic guidance and encouragement around open source. These encourage the creation and use of open source, letting them know in no uncertain terms that the strategic leaders at the company are fully behind it. Additionally, if there are certain kinds of licenses we don’t want engineers using, or other open source guidelines for them, our internal documents need to be explicit,” said Ian Varley, Software Architect at Salesforce and contributor to the guide.

Open source programs help promote an enterprise culture that can make companies more productive, and, according to the guide, a strong strategy document can “help your team understand the business objectives behind your open source program, ensure better decision-making, and minimize risks.”  

Learn how to align your goals for managing and creating open source software with your organization’s business objectives using the tips and proven practices in the new guide to Setting an Open Source Strategy. And, check out all 12 Open Source Guides for the Enterprise for more information on achieving success with open source.

Call for Code

Learn more about IBM’s open source initiatives, including the Call for Code.

Dr. Angel Diaz is the face of open source at IBM as Vice President of Developer Technology, Open Source & Advocacy. At the recent Open Source Summit in Vancouver, we spoke with Diaz to talk about the importance of open source at IBM and how it’s changing the world around us.

LF: What’s the importance of open source in the modern economy?

Angel Diaz: We are living in a technology-fueled business renaissance — cloud, data, artificial intelligence, and the redefinition of the transaction. There is constant democratization of technology. This democratization allows us as computer scientists to innovate higher orders of the stack. You don’t have to worry about compute, storage and network; you get that in the cloud for example, but what has been driving that democratization? Open source.

Angel Diaz, Vice President of Developer Technology, Open Source & Advocacy, IBM (Image copyright: Swapnil Bhartiya)

Open source has been the fuel, the innovation engine, the skills engine, the level playing field that allows us as a society to build more, to build faster and move forward and the rate and pace of that is increasing.

What’s really nice about that is we are doing it in a controlled way with open governance and leveraging all the work that we do in consortia such as the Linux Foundation.

LF: Today, open source has become so pervasive that the question isn’t who is using it, but who is not using it. Can you point to some moments in history that changed everything and the industry realized that this is the right path for innovation, collaboration, and development?

Diaz: That’s a great question. I think there are two such moments. I addressed it in my talk here. The first such moment was in the late eighties, early nineties when, as an industry, we came together and rallied around things like Linux, Apache, Eclipse.

Our products have upwards of 75 percent open source. We are not leeches; we contribute as much as we use. Back in the nineties, we protected open source with intellectual property. It fueled innovation as it gave people the permission and freedom to go ahead and contribute without any worry.

That’s a pivot point number one. Time occurred and a lot of stardust happened. Over the past 10 years or so, we started to create centers of gravity around cloud data, artificial intelligence, transactions and so on.

These centers of gravity came together in consortia with open governance models. This is really important because what that allowed us to do was to create an open architecture and open cloud architecture.

There is one more moment, the third moment where we are now. It’s about individuals. The individual really matters and there are so many new computer scientists across a diverse set of underrepresented groups that it’s exploding.

How we behave in open source is important and that boils down to being a mentor for others. It’s around code, content, and community. So I think the next renaissance of open source is going to be grounded in our ability to connect those three things and help people celebrate their education process, their ability to connect with others like them to be mentored. And then conduct mentoring themselves.

LF: While everything looks rosy, there are some challenges.  Can you elaborate?

Diaz: Nothing is ever rosy. There’s always a lot of work as blood, sweat, and tears – the individual contributor doing the pull requests, submitting code. It’s a lot of work. If we can stick to the company side of the equation, I see organizations think that open source is something that they monetize quickly and that’s not the reality. It’s about creating an ecosystem where everybody monetizes. People need to understand the difference between a real open source, which is a meritocracy based system where everybody can contribute, vs closed source where an organization controls everything tightly. Open source is about open governance – it is not about controlling the commit process.

LF: Once in a while, we see the case of open source companies trying to change the license to survive, as they try to monetize quickly. Do you worry that we might go backward and return to proprietary software?

Diaz: No, I don’t think so. I think the process is pretty well understood, and organizations that adopt the open governance model are successful. I think there’s enough momentum. It’s just a matter of companies understanding how to behave in that world.

LF: How important is open source for IBM?

Diaz: Open source has been in our DNA for a long time, probably more than any other company that I know of. I joined IBM in the mid-nineties at IBM research. I got involved with open source in the early days working with Tim Berners-Lee on web standards. I worked on Linux and many other open source projects. Open source is how we like to create ecosystems and skills. That’s how we drive innovation for our clients helping them to be more productive.

LF: Does open source have any impact beyond the IT world?

Diaz: Yes. In fact, just recently IBM partnered up with United Nations Human Rights, The American Red Cross, and The Linux Foundation to launch something called Call for Code.

It’s not just about the code; it’s about how you use the code for good. We have launched a worldwide hack which ends on September 28, 2018. There’s still time to participate. But Call for Code is the place where developers can submit code and win a contest for good. This year we’re preparing for disasters. It is from what I can see the world’s largest hack ever, and it’s focused for the greater good. I think that really puts a good light on open source.

LF: So it’s not coding for the sake of coding, it’s for some greater good?

Diaz: Exactly. Think about it. We are going to put the winning entries into production. If it’s an app, or whatever gets built, saves one life, it’s worth it. It’ll probably save tens, hundreds, maybe thousands of lives.

IBM has committed to the project for five years. It’s just been incredible to see tens of thousands of developers registering, participating and being part of this endeavor. It doesn’t matter if you’re a developer or a data scientist or even if you’re just a subject matter expert or someone who cares about preparing for disasters, sign up and register because teams are forming. Someone may need somebody who is a professional on hurricanes, you can help. The best teams that I know of are multidisciplinary. It’s not just for developers. Join!

This article was sponsored by IBM and written by The Linux Foundation.

The LFN booth at ONS Europe will showcase the top, community-led, technical demos from the LFN family of projects.

LF Networking (LFN), launched on January 1st of this year, has already made a significant impact in the open source networking ecosystem gaining over 100 members in the just the first 100 days. Critically, LFN has also continues to attract support and participation from many of the world’s top network operators, including six new members announced in May: KT, KDDI, SK Telecom, Sprint, Swisscom; and Deutsche Telekom announced just last month. In fact, member companies of LFN now represent more than 60% of the world’s mobile subscribers. Open source is becoming the de facto way to develop software and it’s the technical collaboration at the project level that makes it so powerful.

Similar to the demos in the LFN Booth at ONS North America, the LFN Booth at ONS Europe will once again showcase the top, community-led, technical demos from the LFN family of projects. We have increased the number of demo stations from 8 to 10, and for the first time, are showcasing demos from the big data analytics project PNDA, and demos that include the newly added LFN Project, Tungsten Fabric (formerly OpenContrail). Technology from founding LFN Projects FD.io, ONAP, OPNFV, and OpenDaylight will also be represented, along with adjacent projects like Acumos, Kubernetes, OpenCI, Open Compute Project, and OpenStack.

Building on the Virtual Central Office demo shown at the OPNFV Summit last year, a team from Red Hat and 10+ participating companies, including China Mobile, have expanded to show a mobile access network configuration using vRAN for the LTE RAN and vEPC built in open source. Another demo showcasing collaboration from 10+ companies, Orange will showcase their Orange OpenLab which is based on several LFN projects. OpenLab allows for the management of CI/CD pipelines, and provides a stable environment for developers. Other operator-led demos include CCVPN (Cross Domain and Cross Layer VPN), from China Mobile and Vodafone, that demonstrates ONAP orchestration capability; and a demo from AT&T showcasing the design, configuration, and deployment of a closed loop instance acting on a VNF (vCPE).

Industry hot topics like cloud native approaches to virtual network functions, service mesh, and testing for 5G and edge computing scenarios will also be covered.

Listed below is the full networking demo lineup, and you can read detailed descriptions of each demo here.

  • ONAP Control Loops & ONAP CLAMP Dashboard (ONAP) – Presented by AT&T
  • OPNFV Testing for Open Infrastructure Federation (OPNFV, OpenStack) – Presented by China Mobile, Dell, Ericsson, Huawei, Intel, SUSE, and ZTE
  • Network Telemetry Analytics – Collecting, Ingesting, and Analyzing Telemetry Data (PNDA) – Presented by Cisco, Huawei, Gradiant, Inocybe Technologies, and Xoriant
  • ONAP-Powered Cross-Operator Connectivity Service Demo (ONAP) – Presented by CMCC, Vodafone, and Huawei
  • Service Mesh and SDN: At-Scale Cluster Load Balancing (Tungsten Fabric, Linux OS, Istio, Envoy, Kubernetes, HAProxy) – Presented by Juniper Networks
  • Automating Transport Services Over Multi-Domain Networks (OpenDaylight) – Presented by Lumina Networks
  • LFN Orange Openlab: A Neutral Open Source Catalyst & Playground (ONAP, OPNFV, Acumos, OpenCI, Openstack, Kubernetes) – Presented by Orange and 10+ partners
  • An Open Approach: Virtualizing the CO for Mobile Services (OPNFV, ODL, OpenStack, OCP) – Presented by Red Hat and 10+ partners
  • SDN Deployment with Multi Data-Path Options (Tungsten Fabric, FD.io) – Presented by Sofioni Networks & ATS
  • Intelligent ONAP Policies Using AI/ML Realized Through Acumos (ONAP, Acumos) – Presented by Tech Mahindra Limited

To all the demo managers with hardhats and tool belts — thank for your hard work pulling these together. To everyone else, come meet us at the construction site to see where open source networking is going.

If you haven’t already registered for ONS Europe, use code ONS18SPR for 15% off. Hurry, standard registration expires September 15th. Register today!

Registration deadline for ONS Europe is approaching – Register now and save $605.

Here’s a sneak peek at why you need to be at Open Networking Summit Europe in Amsterdam next month! But hurry – spots are going quickly. Secure your spot and register by September 1 to save $605.

Open Networking Summit, the premier open networking event in North America now in its 7th year, comes to Europe for the first time next month. This event is like no other, with content presented by your peers in the networking community, sessions carefully selected by networking specialists in the program committee, and plenty of networking and collaboration opportunities, this is an event you won’t want to miss.

Highlights include:

  1. Learn About the Future & Lessons Learned in Open Networking: Hear about innovative ideas on the disruption and change of the landscape of networking and networking-enabled markets in the next 3-5 years across AI, ML, and deep learning applied to networking, SD-WAN, IIOT, data insights, business intelligence, blockchain & telecom, and more. Get an in-depth scoop on the lessons learned from today’s global deployments.
  2. 100+ Sessions Covering Telecom, Enterprise, and Cloud Networking: With a blend of deep technical/developer sessions and business/architecture sessions, there are a plethora of learning opportunities for everyone. Plan your schedule now and choose from sessions, labs, tutorials, and lightning talks presented by Airbnb, Deutsche Telekom AG, Thomas Reuters, Huawei, General Motors, Türk Telekom, China Mobile, and many more.
  3. Business & Architecture Tracks: 50+ sessions in the business & architecture, service provider, cloud networking, and operations tracks covering edge, cloud native, VNF, AI, 5G, blockchain, and more.
  4. Deep-Dive Labs & Tutorials: Get hands-on training in labs and tutorials including NFV Features in Kubernetes, Integrating ODL in OpenStack, Operator Edge Cloud Reference Design Workshop (CORD / ONF), and more.
  5. LFN Unconference Track & LFN Booth Demos: Discuss ideas, teach others, and collaborate in the unconference track sessions! Visit the LFN Booth to see 10 top community-driven demos across a range of LFN projects.
  6. Networking Opportunities: Attend the onsite attendee reception or use the networking app to expand your connections by finding and meeting with attendees with similar interests. Attendees will gather from over 300 companies worldwide.
  7. Social Activities: Take a break and join the 5K fun run or morning yoga. Women attending are invited to collaborate at the Women in Networking Lunch.
  8. Demos & Dev Lounges: Meet in the developer lounges for face-to-face collaboration and check out dozens of demos from networking projects and companies in the sponsor showcase, as well as those that will be featured on the keynote stage!
  9. Learn about the cross section of Networking with Containers, Blockchain and more. Over 20 sessions offer a focus on the innovation of networking with blockchain, edge computing and Kubernetes, containers and cloud native technologies.
  10. Hear from the Leading Experts in Networking: Hear keynotes from Axel Clauberg, Telekom AG; Dr. Paul Doany, Türk Telekom; All Goldner, Amdocs; Fran Heeran; Vodafone Group; Arpit Joshipura, The Linux Foundation; Catherine Lefevre, AT&T; Bill Ren, Huawei; and more.

Sign up to receive updates on Open Networking Summit Europe:

REGISTER BY SEPTEMBER 1 TO SAVE $605 »

Need help convincing your manager? Here’s a letter that can help you make the request to attend Open Networking Summit Europe.

Applications for diversity and needs-based scholarships are also being accepted. Get information on eligibility and how to apply. Free childcare is also available for attendees.

Call for Code

Todd Moore, Vice President Open Technology, IBM, speaks about the Call for Code initiative.

Open source is about community. At IBM, we have a commitment to open source and our developers are passionate about contributing back to open source. I’ve had the privilege to work with organizations like The Linux Foundation, Cloud Native Computing Foundation, Node.js Foundation, JS Foundation, Cloud Foundry Foundation, and many others. I’ve witnessed firsthand the power of communities to come together to grow an ecosystem, develop technology, and accelerate innovation. There’s also a human part to open source – a collective responsibility that we have to the world. There is work we can do that goes beyond developing platforms to grow our businesses and solve technical challenges. We can do more by focusing our combined developers, who already work together in open source, on critical problems that face humanity.

David Clark Cause is a company that creates purpose based initiatives and brings stakeholders together to tackle a common cause. Last year, David Clark Cause came to us with an opportunity to rally developers around a common cause and have a lasting impact.  We’ve done work like this before – for example, our IBM Foundation is working with the Open Medical Records (OpenMRS) project to create an oncology suite for use in countries in Africa and other regions using this open technology. The IBM Corporate Citizenship Office has helped deploy software from the Sahana Foundation’s open source disaster management solutions in over a dozen countries.

Given 2017 was one of the worst years on record for natural disasters, we decided to focus the efforts of 22 million developers around the world on this cause through the Call for Code initiative. David Clark Cause gave us the inspiration, and other partners like the United Nations, the American Red Cross, and The Linux Foundation came together to pool our collective efforts. Since 2000, natural disasters have directly affected 2.5 billion people, with 1.5 trillion in economic impact since 2003. And over the last 30 years, flooding is up over 240%. As developers, we can help people be more prepared, help them during a natural disaster, and help them recover afterward. We can make communities more resilient together.

Call for Code judges include iconic developers like Linus Torvalds and Tim Berners-Lee. The winning team and two semifinalists will receive support from The Linux Foundation to host their submission as an open source project and build a community around it, ensuring that it is deployable around the world in the areas of greatest need. Please join us- learn more at callforcode.org.

Call for Code

Answer the Call for Code. (Image: developerWorks TV)

The Call for Code initiative aims to harness the collective power of the global open source developer community against the growing threat of natural disasters. According to IBM, “the goal is to develop technology solutions that significantly improve disaster preparedness, provide relief from devastation caused by fires, floods, hurricanes, tsunamis and earthquakes, and benefit Call for Code’s charitable partners — the United Nations Human Rights Office and the American Red Cross.”

In a recent webcast — How 22M Developers Take on Disaster Preparedness — Mary Glackin, SVP of Science & Forecast at The Weather Company and IBM Business, spoke with representatives from participating organizations about the initiative and some of the specific goals it aims to achieve.

The Call for Code is “encouraging the global community of developers to stand up for the rights of others,” said Laurent Sauveur, Chief of External Relations, UN Human Rights.   

“It’s an exciting cause and it’s a meaningful one,” said Trishan de Lanerolle, Program Manager, Networking at The Linux Foundation, which will host the code developed through this initiative.

Additionally, Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux and Git, will join a panel of technologists to evaluate submissions. Once complete, the winning solution will be deployed in the real world. Angel Diaz, VP Developer, IBM, explained that The Linux Foundation will host the code under the Apache 2.0 license, which will allow the code to evolve and improve even beyond the scope of this contest.

Practical Solutions

“Technology can be a wonderful and very powerful force for good,” said Sauveur, and it can improve things like tracking of aid delivery and communication in crisis situations to help pinpoint areas of need.

Getting people what they need, when they need it, and where they need it to alleviate suffering is key, said Brad Kieserman, Vice President of Disaster Cycle Services American Red Cross. And, the science of where is critical: where is the damage, where are the resources, where do they need to be?

Predictive analytics are at the center of this practice, said Kieserman, to help visualize data relating to the movement of people and resources.  “As models of service delivery improve, we can better understand the need and increase efficiency.”

Ben Narasin, Venture Partner, New Enterprise Associates offered tips for approaching the development challenge. When building such solutions, he said, it’s important to consider scale.  You need an idea that can scale, you need to build code that can scale, and you need to look at building a team that can scale.

“You cannot look at this from the perspective of ‘I have a cool technology that I want to deploy that will solve this problem.’” said de Lanerolle. “You have to think about your product being used in resource-poor environments.” For example, you have to consider things like connectivity and battery life and how to get your data at the end of the day. Such last mile challenges are critical, and open source can help.

Don’t reinvent the wheel, said de Lanerolle. “Take the opportunity to look at what’s out there.” He suggests looking at “existing technologies that are backed by open source projects where you can build resources that are available for everybody rather than just building out a one-time solution.”

Commit to the Cause

If you’re a coder, sign up, and if you’re interested, spread the word, said Glackin. “We can all be involved. Let’s all answer the call for code and make a difference in the world.”

We invite you to amplify the initiative and join the call. You can learn more about the Call for Code and watch the complete webcast here: http://ibm.biz/BdYxHZ.

OS Summit

Register now for Open Source Summit NA and save $300 through June 17.

Join us in Vancouver in August for 250+ educational sessions covering the latest technologies and topics in open source, and hear from industry experts including keynotes from:

  • Ajay Agrawal, Artificial Intelligence & Machine Learning Expert, Author of Prediction Machines, and Founder, The Creative Destruction Lab
  • Jennifer Cloer, Founder of reTHINKit and Creator and Executive Producer, The Chasing Grace Project
  • Wim Coekaerts, Senior Vice President of Operating Systems and Virtualization Engineering, Oracle
  • Ben Golub, Executive Chairman and Interim CEO, and Shawn Wilkinson, Co-founder, Storj Labs
  • Preethi Kasireddy, Founder & CEO, TruStory
  • Window Snyder, Chief Security Officer, Fastly
  • Imad Sousou, Corporate Vice President and General Manager, Open Source Technology Center, Intel
  • Sana Tariq, Senior Architect, E2E Service Orchestration, TELUS


Additional keynotes and the full schedule of 250+ sessions will be announced next week. Details on co-located events, evening activities, and other activities—including Speed Mentoring, First-Time Attendee Breakfast, Women in Open Source Lunch, Diversity Mixer, Kids Day, and more—will be announced shortly as well.

Register now and save $300 through June 17!

Register Now>>

Open Networking Summit

Speak at Open Networking Summit Europe – Submit by June 24.

Share your expertise and speak at Open Networking Summit Europe, happening September 25-27 in Amsterdam. Proposals are due June 24, 2018. Submit now.

Suggested Topics:

Networking Futures: Innovative ideas on the disruption and change of the landscape of networking and networking enabled markets in the next 3-5 years across: AI, ML, and deep learning impact to networking, SD-WAN, IIOT, Data Insights, Business Intelligence, Blockchain & Telecom, and more.

General Network: Common business, architecture, process or people issues that are important to move the Networking agenda forward in the next 1-2 years.

Service Provider & Cloud Networking (Technical): The containerization of service provider workloads, multi-cloud, 5G, fog, and edge access cloud networking.

Service Provider & Cloud Networking (Business & Architecture):Software-defined packet-optical, mobile edge computing, 4G video/CDN, 5G networking, and incorporating legacy systems behind (legacy enterprise workload migration, role of networking in cloud migration, and interworking of carrier OSS/BSS/FCAPS systems).

Enterprise IT DevOps (Technical): Scale and performance in SDN deployments, expanding container networking, maintaining stability in migration, networking needs of a hybrid cloud/virtualized environment, and figuring out the roadmap from a cost perspective.

Enterprise IT (Business & Architecture): Use cases on IoT and networking from the retail, transportation, utility, healthcare of government sectors, specifically on cost modeling for hybrid environments, automation (network and beyond), analytics, security and risk management/modeling with ML, and NFV for the enterprise.

Get Inspired!

Watch presentations from Open Networking Summit North America 2018

open source AI

We look at three open source AI projects aimed at simplifying access to AI tools and insights.

At the intersection of open source and artificial intelligence, innovation is flourishing, and companies ranging from Google to Facebook to IBM are open sourcing AI and machine learning tools.

According to research from IT Intelligence Markets, the global artificial intelligence software market is expected to reach 13.89 billion USD by the end of 2022. However, talk about AI has accelerated faster than actual deployments. According to a detailed McKinsey report on the growing impact of AI, “only about 20 percent of AI-aware companies are currently using one or more of its technologies in a core business process or at scale.” Here, we look at three open source AI projects aimed at simplifying access to AI tools and insights.

TensorFlow

Google has open sourced a software framework called TensorFlow that it spent years developing to support its AI software and other predictive and analytics programs. TensorFlow is the engine behind several Google tools you may already use, including Google Photos and the speech recognition found in the Google app.

Google has also released two new AIY kits that let individuals easily get hands-on with artificial intelligence. Focused on computer vision, and voice assistants, the two kits come as small self-assembly cardboard boxes with all the components needed for use. The kits are currently available at Target in the United States, and, notably, are both based on the open source Raspberry Pi platform—more evidence of how much is going on at the intersection of open source and AI.

Sparkling Water

H2O.ai, formerly known as OxData, has carved out a niche in the machine learning and artificial intelligence arena, offering platform tools as well as Sparkling Water, a package that works with Apache Spark. H2O.ai’s tools, which you can access simply by downloading, operate under Apache licenses, and you can run them on clusters powered by Amazon Web Services (AWS) and others for just a few hundred dollars. Never before has this kind of AI-focused data sifting power been so affordable and easy to deploy.

Sparkling Water includes a toolchain for building machine learning pipelines on Apache Spark. In essence, Sparkling Water is an API that allows Spark users to leverage H2O’s open source machine learning platform instead of or alongside the algorithms that are included in Spark’s existing machine-learning library. H2O.ai has published several use cases for how Sparkling Water and its other open tools are used in fields ranging from genomics to insurance, demonstrating that organizations everywhere can now leverage open source AI tools.

H2O.ai’s Vinod Iyengar, who oversees business development at the company, says they are working to bring the power of AI to businesses. “Our machine learning platform features advanced algorithms that can be applied to specialized use cases and the wide variety of problems that organizations face,” he notes.

Just as open source focused companies such as Red Hat have combined commercial products and services with free and open source ones, H2O.ai is exploring the same model on the artificial intelligence front. Driverless AI is a new commercial product from H2O.ai that aims to ease AI and data science tasks at enterprises. With Driverless AI, non-technical users can gain insights from data, optimize algorithms, and apply machine learning to business processes. Note that, although it leverages tools with open source roots, Driverless AI is a commercial product.

Acumos

Acumos is another open source project aimed at simplifying access to AI. Acumos AI, which is part of the LF Deep Learning Foundation, is a platform and open source framework that makes it easy to build, share, and deploy AI apps. According to the website, “It standardizes the infrastructure stack and components required to run an out-of-the-box general AI environment. This frees data scientists and model trainers to focus on their core competencies and accelerates innovation.”

The goal is to make these critical new technologies available to developers and data scientists, including those who may have limited experience with deep learning and AI. Acumos also has a thriving marketplace where you can grab and deploy applications.

“An open and federated AI platform like the Acumos platform allows developers and companies to take advantage of the latest AI technologies and to more easily share proven models and expertise,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director at The Linux Foundation. “Acumos will benefit developers and data scientists across numerous industries and fields, from network and video analytics to content curation, threat prediction, and more.” You can learn more about Acumos here.