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Autodesk is undergoing a company-wide shift to open source and inner source. And that’s on top of the culture change that both development methods require.

Autodesk is undergoing a company-wide shift to open source and inner source. And that’s on top of the culture change that both development methods require.

Inner source means applying open source development practices and methodologies to internal projects, even if the projects are proprietary. And the culture change required to be successful can be a hard shift from a traditional corporate hierarchy to an open approach. Even though they’re connected, all three changes are distinct heavy lifts.

They began by hiring Guy Martin as Director of Open Source Strategy in the Engineering Practice at Autodesk, which was designed to transform engineering across the company. Naturally, open source would play a huge role in that effort, including spurring the use of inner source. But neither would flourish if the company culture didn’t change. And so the job title swiftly evolved to Director of Open @ADSK at the company.

“I tend to focus a lot more on the culture change and the inner source part of my role even though I’m working through a huge compliance initiative right now on the open source side,” Martin said.

The history of Autodesk’s open source transformation began shortly after the shift of all its products to cloud began, including its AutoCAD architecture software, building information modeling with its Revit products, as well as  its media and entertainment products. The company’s role in open source in entertainment is now so significant that Martin often speaks at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences on open source. They want to hear about what  Autodesk is doing as part of a larger collection of initiatives that the Academy is working on, Martin said.

At Autodesk, the goal is to spring engineers loose from their business silos and create a fully open source, cloud-centric company.

“Your primary identity detaches from being part of the AutoCAD team or part of the Revit team, or the 3ds Max or Inventor team or any of these products,” Martin explained. “It’s now shaping you into part of the Autodesk engineering team, and not your individual silo as a product organization in the company.”

Talent acquisition is among the top business goals for Open@Autodesk, especially given the company’s intense focus on innovation as well as making all of its products work seamlessly together. It takes talent skilled in open source methodologies and thinking to help make that happen. But it also means setting up the team dynamics so collaboration is more natural and less forced.

“With company cultures and some engineering cultures, the freedom to take an unconventional route to solve a problem doesn’t exist,” Martin said. “A lot of my job is to create that freedom so that smart and motivated engineers can figure out a way to put things together in a way that maybe they wouldn’t have thought of without that freedom and that culture.”

To help create an open source culture, the right tools must be in place and, oddly enough, those tools sometimes aren’t open source. For example, Martin created a single instance of Slack rather than use IRC, because Slack was more comfortable for users in other lines of the business who were already using it. The intent was to get teams to start talking across their organizational boundaries.

Another tool Martin is working with is Bitergia Analytics to monitor and manage Autodesk’s use of GitHub Enterprise.

Martin says the three key lessons he’s learned as an open source program manager are:

  1. Stay flexible because change happens
  2. Be humble but bold
  3. Be passionate.

“I’ve been at Autodesk two years but I’m still bootstrapping some of the things around culture. We have strong contributors in some projects, while in some projects we’re consuming. I think you have to do both, especially if you’re bootstrapping a new open source effort in a company. ”

“The challenge is always balancing the needs of the product teams, who have to get a product out the door, and who (and as an engineer I can say this) will take shortcuts whenever possible. They want to know, ‘why should we be doing this for the community? All we care about is our stuff.’ And it’s getting them past that. Yes, we’re doing work that’s going to be used elsewhere, but in the end we’re going to get benefits from pulling work from other people who have done work that they knew was going to be used in the community.”

The Linux Kernel Development Report, which was recently released by The Linux Foundation, sheds light on various aspects of the development process as well as on who is doing the work. According to the report, more than 85 percent of all kernel development is done by developers who are being paid for their work. Additionally, the overall number of companies involved in working toward the improvement of the kernel is increasing, with the top 30 companies contributing to the Linux kernel shown in the table at right.

The report states:

What we see here is that a small number of companies is responsible for a large portion of the total changes to the kernel. But there is a “long tail” of companies (nearly 500 of which do not appear in the above list) which have made significant changes since the 4.7 release. There may be no other examples of such a large, common resource being supported by such a large group of independent actors in such a collaborative way.

Jens Axboe, Software Engineer at Facebook

In this article, Jens Axboe, Software Engineer at Facebook, answers a few questions about how and why he contributes to the Linux kernel.

The Linux Foundation: What role do you play in the community and what subsystem(s) do you work on?

Jens Axboe: I’m the Linux block layer maintainer, so I primarily develop features in that area, as well as help review and guide others doing the same.

The Linux Foundation: What have you been working on this year?

Axboe: This year, I contributed an IO scheduler framework for the block multiqueue subsystem, support for allowing applications to inform the kernel of life time of writes, and much faster IO accounting for blk-mq.   

Since 4.8, I have contributed about 200 patches. In terms of features, the most interesting, which are not mentioned above, are probably writeback throttling (blk-wbt), IO polling for fast devices (both classic and hybrid/efficient modes), and more efficient O_DIRECT.

The Linux Foundation: What do you think the kernel community needs to work on in the upcoming year?

Axboe: Attracting more young talent. Most young folks these days gravitate towards product instead of infrastructure. It’s important that we bring new talent into the fold.

The Linux Foundation: Why do you contribute to the Linux kernel?

Axboe: First of all, because I enjoy the work. It’s challenging and fun, plus there’s a personal gratification knowing that your code is running on billions of devices. Finally, it’s my job.

You can learn more about the Linux kernel development process and read more developer profiles in the full report. Download the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report now.

OS Summit keynotes

Watch keynotes and technical sessions from OS Summit and ELC Europe here.If you weren’t able to attend Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) Europe last week, don’t worry! We’ve recorded keynote presentations from both events and all the technical sessions from ELC Europe to share with you here.

Check out the on-stage conversation with Linus Torvalds and VMware’s Dirk Hohndel, opening remarks from The Linux Foundation’s Executive Director Jim Zemlin, and a special presentation from 11-year-old CyberShaolin founder Reuben Paul. You can watch these and other ELC and OS Summit keynotes below for insight into open source collaboration, community and technical expertise on containers, cloud computing, embedded Linux, Linux kernel, networking, and much more.

And, you can watch all 55+ technical sessions from Embedded Linux Conference here.

The 2017 Linux Kernel Report illustrates the kernel development process and highlights the work of some of the dedicated developers creating the largest collaborative project in the history of computing.

Roughly 15,600 developers from more than 1,400 companies have contributed to the Linux kernel since 2005, when the adoption of Git made detailed tracking possible, according to the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report released at the Linux Kernel Summit in Prague.

This report — co-authored by Jonathan Corbet, Linux kernel developer and editor of LWN.net, and Greg Kroah-Hartman, Linux kernel maintainer and Linux Foundation fellow — illustrates the kernel development process and highlights the work of some of the dedicated developers who are creating the largest collaborative project in the history of computing.

Jens Axboe, Linux block maintainer and software engineer at Facebook, contributes to the kernel because he enjoys the work. “It’s challenging and fun, plus there’s a personal gratification knowing that your code is running on billions of devices,” he said.

The 2017 report covers development work completed through Linux kernel 4.13, with an emphasis on releases 4.8 to 4.13. During this reporting period, an average of 8.5 changes per hour were accepted into the kernel; this is a significant increase from the 7.8 changes seen in the previous report.

Here are other highlights from the report:

  • Since the last report, more than 4,300 developers from over 500 companies have contributed to the kernel.
  • 1,670 of these developers contributed for the first time — about a third of contributors.
  • The most popular area for new developers to make their first patch is the “staging tree,” which is a place for device drivers that are not yet ready for inclusion in the kernel proper.
  • The top 10 organizations sponsoring Linux kernel development since the last report are Intel, Red Hat, Linaro, IBM, Samsung, SUSE, Google, AMD, Renesas, and Mellanox.

Kernel developer Julia Lawall, Senior Researcher at Inria, works on the Coccinelle tool that’s used to find bugs in the Linux kernel. She contributes to the kernel for many reasons, including “the potential impact, the challenge of understanding a huge code base of low-level code, and the chance to interact with a community with a very high level of technical skill.”

You can learn more about the Linux kernel development process and read more developer profiles in the full report. Download the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report now.

Latest version of annual report demonstrates the continued growth in interest and participation in the Linux kernel, as well as accelerating rate of change

PRAGUE (Open Source Summit Europe) – October 25, 2017 – The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the immediate release of its 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report. The report analyzes the work done by 15,600 developers over more than a decade, as well as more recent trends.

This is the eighth such report that is released on a roughly annual basis to help illustrate the Linux kernel development process and the work that defines the largest collaborative project in the history of computing. This year’s paper covers work completed through Linux kernel 4.13, with an emphasis on releases 4.8 to 4.13. The last report was released in August 2016 and focused on 3.19 to 4.7.

Key findings from this year’s paper include:

  • Roughly 15,600 developers from more than 1,400 companies have contributed to the Linux kernel since the adoption of Git made detailed tracking possible. Since the last report, over 4,300 developers from more than 500 companies have contributed to the kernel; 1,670 of these developers contributed for the first time, comprising about a third of contributors.
  • The Top 10 organizations sponsoring Linux kernel development since the last report include Intel, Red Hat, Linaro, IBM, Samsung, SUSE, Google, AMD, Renesas and Mellanox. The complete top 30 contributing organizations can be seen in the full report.
  • The rate of Linux development continues to increase, as does the number of developers and companies involved in the process. The average number of changes accepted into the kernel per hour is 8.5, a significant increase from the 7.8 changes in the last report, which translates to 204 changes every day and over 1,400 per week. The average days of development per release increased slightly to 67.66 days from 66 last year, with every release spaced either 63 or 70 days apart, providing significant predictability. The 4.9 and 4.12 development cycles featured the highest patch rates ever seen in the history of the kernel project.
  • The number of unpaid developers may be stabilizing, with these developers contributing 8.2% of contributions, a slight increase from 7.7% in last year’s report. This is still significantly down from the 11.8% reported in 2014. This is likely due to kernel developers being in short supply, leading those who demonstrate the ability to submit quality patches to not have trouble finding job offers.

The report is co-authored by Jonathan Corbet, Linux kernel developer and editor of LWN.net, and Greg Kroah-Hartman, Linux kernel maintainer and Linux Foundation fellow. This year’s report also features interviews with 17 Linux kernel developers and maintainers.

“The incredible rates of contribution and participation in the Linux kernel demonstrate the continued strength and scalability of the kernel community,” said Jim Zemlin, executive director of The Linux Foundation. “This report provides important information that helps show how incredibly effective the collaborative development model can be for one of the most essential software projects in history.”

To download the full report, please visit https://www.linuxfoundation.org/2017-linux-kernel-report-landing-page/.

The paper is being released today at the invitation-only Linux Kernel Summit, taking place alongside Open Source Summit Europe, hosted by The Linux Foundation. Open Source Summit is a technical conference where 2,000+ developers, operators, and community leadership professionals convene to collaborate, share information and learn about the latest in open technologies, including Linux, containers, cloud computing and more. The event combines the existing LinuxCon, ContainerCon and CloudOpen conferences with the all new Open Community Conference and Diversity Empowerment Summit. For more information and keynote session livestream, visit http://events.linuxfoundation.org/events/open-source-summit-europe/program/live-video-stream.

Additional Resources

Video: Greg Kroah-Hartman: Linux Kernel Development – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mmu0pkSI5sw

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and commercial adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

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The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

SAN FRANCISCO, October 24, 2017 — The OpenChain Project is delighted to announce that Comcast has become a Platinum Member and will take a seat on the Governing Board. OpenChain has been growing rapidly in recently months and now has a Governing Board of 14 members that support and inspire a community of almost 200 to address the key requirements for open source compliance in the supply chain.

“The OpenChain Project is centered around a specification that outlines an approach for open source compliance in all types of organization,” says Shane Coughlan, OpenChain Project Director. “Today, as we welcome Comcast to our Governing Board, we benefit from a wealth of knowledge and experience provided by a diverse group of stakeholders. Together our member companies and our broader community will collaborate to build a better, more efficient supply chain and will help to ensure that all parties benefit from effective use of open source technology.”

“OpenChain provides a powerful platform to accelerate open source adoption and engagement through shared best practices in compliance,” Nithya Ruff, Senior Director of Open Source Practice at Comcast Cable, said. “We’re excited to learn from our peers and share our experiences as we engage in this important and valuable project.”

The OpenChain Project identifies key recommended processes for effective open source management. The project builds trust in open source by making open source license compliance simpler and more consistent.

The OpenChain Specification defines a core set of requirements every quality compliance program must satisfy. The OpenChain Curriculum provides the educational foundation for open source processes and solutions, whilst meeting a key requirement of the OpenChain Specification. OpenChain Conformance allows organizations to display their adherence to these requirements.

The result is that open source license compliance becomes more predictable, understandable and efficient for participants of the software supply chain.

Organizations of all sizes are invited to review the OpenChain Project, to complete our free Online Self-Certification Questionnaire, and to join our community of trust.

Additional Resources

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and commercial adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

# # #

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see our trademark usage page: https://www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

By Fatih Degirmenci, Yolanda Robla Mota, Markos Chandras

The OPNFV Community will soon issue its fifth release, OPNFV Euphrates. Over the past four releases, the community has introduced different components from upstream projects, integrated them to compose different flavors of the stack, and put them through extensive testing to help establish a reference platform for Network Functions Virtualization (NFV). While doing this work, the OPNFV community strictly followed its founding principle: Upstream First. Bugs found or features identified as missing are implemented directly into upstream code; OPNFV has carried very little in its own source code repositories, reflecting the project’s true upstream nature. This was achieved by the use of stable release components from the upstream communities. In addition to the technical aspects of the work, OPNFV established good relationships with these upstream communities, such as OpenStack, OpenDaylight, FD.io, and others.

Building on previous experience working on integrating and testing different components of the stack, Euphrates brings applied learnings in Continuous Delivery (CD) and DevOps principles and practices into the fray, via the Cross Community Continuous Integration (XCI) initiative.  Read below for a quick summary about what it is, where we are now, what we are releasing as part of Euphrates, and a sneak peek into the future.

Upstream Development Model
The current development and release model employed by OPNFV provides value to OPNFV community itself and the upstream communities it works with, but is limited and dependent on using stable versions of upstream components. This essentially limits the speed at which new development and bugfixes can be contributed to upstream projects. This results in losing the essence of CI (finding issues, providing fast and tailored feedback) and means that the developers who contribute to upstream projects might not see results for several months, after everyone has moved on to the next item in their roadmap. The notion of constantly playing “catch up” with upstream projects is not sustainable.

In order for OPNFV to achieve true CI, we need to ensure that upstream communities implement a CD approach. One way to make this happen is to enable patch-level testing and consuming of components from master branches of upstream communities–allowing for more timely feedback when it matters most. The XCI initiative establishes new feedback loops across communities and with supporting tooling makes it possible to:

  • shorten the time it takes to introduce new features
  • make it easier to identify and fix bugs
  • ease the effort to develop, integrate, and test the reference platform
  • establish additional feedback loops within OPNFV, towards the users and between the communities OPNFV works with
  • provide additional testing from a production-like environment
  • increase real-time visibility

Apart from providing feedback to upstream communities, we strive to frequently provide working software to our users, allowing them to be part of the feedback loop. This ensures that while OPNFV pushes upstream communities to CD, the platform itself also moves in the same direction.

Helping Developers Develop by Supporting Source-Based Deployments
One of the most important aspects of XCI is to ensure developers do what they do best: develop. XCI achieves this by supporting source-based deployments. This means that developers can patch the source on their workstations and get their patch deployed quickly, cutting the feedback time from months to hours (or even minutes). The approach employed by XCI to enable source-based deployments ensures that nothing comes between developers and the source code who can even override whatever is provided by XCI to ensure the deployment fits their needs. Additionally, users also benefit as they can adjust what they get from XCI to further fit their needs. This is also important for patch-level testing and feedback.

Choice
What we summarized until now are firsts for OPNFV and perhaps firsts for the entire open source ecosystem; bringing multiple open source components together from master. But we have a few other firsts provided by XCI as part of the Euphrates release, such as:

  • multiple deployment flavors ranging from all-in-one to full blown HA deployment
  • multi-distro support: Ubuntu, Centos, and openSUSE
  • extended CI pipelines for all projects that choose to take part in XCI

This is another focus area of XCI: giving choice. We believe that if we offer choices to developers and users, they will leverage these options to invent new things or use them in new and different ways. XCI empowers the community by removing barriers and constraints and providing freedom of choice.

XCI utilizes tools such as Bifrost and OpenStack Ansible directly from upstream and what is done by XCI is to use these tools in a way that enables CI.

Join the Party
Are we done yet? Of course not. We are working on bringing even more components together and are reaching out to additional communities, such as ONAP and Kubernetes.

If you would like to be part of this, check the documentation and try using the XCI Sandbox to bring up a mini OPNFV cluster on your laptop. You can find XCI developers on #opnfv-pharos channel on Freenode and while you are there, join us to make things even better.

Finally, we would like to thank everyone who has participated in the development of XCI, reviewed our patches, listened to our ideas, provided hardware resources, motivated us in different ways, and, most importantly, encouraged us. What we have now is just the beginning and we are on our way to change things.

Heading to Open Source Summit Europe? Don’t miss Fatih’s presentation, “Bringing Open Source Communities Together: Cross-Community CI,” Monday, October 23, 14:20 – 15:00.

Learn more about XCI by reading the Solutions Brief or watching the video, and signing up for this XCI-based webinar on November 29th.

This article originally appeared on the OPNFV website.

MesosCon

Sign up for free live video streaming of all keynote sessions at MesosCon Europe.

Can’t make it to MesosCon Europe in Prague this week? The Linux Foundation is pleased to offer free live video streaming of all keynote sessions on Thursday, Oct 26 and Friday, Oct 27, 2017.

MesosCon is an annual conference organized by the Apache Mesos community, bringing together users and developers to share and learn about the project and its growing ecosystem. Users, developers, experts, and community members will convene next week.

Apache Software Foundation, Mesosphere, and Netflix are among the many organizations that will keynote next week.

The livestream will begin on Thursday, Oct. 26 at 9 a.m. CEST (Central European Summer Time). Sign up now! You can also follow our live event updates on Twitter with #MesosCon.

All keynotes will be broadcasted live, including a welcome and opening remarks by Ben Hindman, Co-Creator, Apache Mesos and Founder, Mesosphere.

Other featured keynotes include:

  • Rich Bowen, VP Conferences, Apache Software Foundation will analyze The Apache Way.
  • Katharina Probst, Netflix will talk about making and keeping Netflix highly available.
  • SMACK in the enterprise panel.
  • Pierre Cheynier, Operations Engineer, Criteo will discuss operating 600+ Mesos servers on 7 data centers.
  • And more.

View the full schedule of keynotes.

Sign up now for the free live video stream.

Once you sign up, you’ll be able to view the livestream on the same page. If you sign up prior to the livestream day/time, simply return to this page and you’ll be able to view.

 

Open Source Summit livestream

The Linux Foundation is pleased to offer free live video streaming of all keynote sessions at Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference Europe, Oct. 23 to Oct. 25, 2017.

Join 2000 technologists and community members next week as they convene at Open Source Summit Europe and Embedded Linux Conference Europe in Prague. If you can’t be there in person, you can still take part, as The Linux Foundation is pleased to offer free live video streaming of all keynote sessions on Monday, Oct. 23 through Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2017.  So, you can watch the event keynotes presented by Google, Intel, and VMware, among others.

The livestream will begin on Monday, Oct. 23 at 9 a.m. CEST (Central European Summer Time). Sign up now! You can also follow our live event updates on Twitter with #OSSummit.

All keynotes will be broadcasted live, including talks by Keila Banks, 15-year-old Programmer, Web Designer, and Technologist with her father Philip Banks; Mitchell Hashimoto, Founder, HashiCorp Founder of HashiCorp and Creator of Vagrant, Packer, Serf, Consul, Terraform, Vault and Nomad; Jan Kizska, Senior Key Expert, Siemens AG; Dirk Hohndel, VP & Chief Open Source Officer, VMware in a Conversation with Linux and Git Creator Linus Torvalds; Michael Dolan, Vice President of Strategic Programs & The Linux Foundation; and Jono Bacon, Community/Developer Strategy Consultant and Author.

Other featured conference keynotes include:

  • Neha Narkhede — Co-Founder & CTO of Confluent will discuss Apache Kafka and the Rise of the Streaming Platform
  • Reuben Paul — 11-year-old Hacker, CyberShaolin Founder and cybersecurity ambassador will talk about how Hacking is Child’s Play
  • Arpit Joshipura — General Manager, Networking, The Linux Foundation who will discuss Open Source Networking and a Vision of Fully Automated Networks
  • Imad Sousou — Vice President and General Manager, Software & Services Group, Intel
  • Sarah Novotny — Head of Open Source Strategy for GCP, Google
  • And more

View the full schedule of keynotes.

And sign up now for the free live video stream.

Once you sign up to watch the event keynotes, you’ll be able to view the livestream on the same page. If you sign up prior to the livestream day/time, simply return to this page and you’ll be able to view.

 

All Things Open

Join The Linux Foundation at All Things Open; check out conference highlights below. (Image: All Things Open)

Going to All Things Open in Raleigh? While you’re there, be sure stop by The Linux Foundation training booth for fun giveaways and a chance to win one of two Raspberry Pi kits. Two winners will be chosen onsite on the last day of the conference, Oct. 24, at 3:05pm.

Other booth giveaways include The Linux Foundation branded webcam covers, The Linux Foundation projects’ stickers, Tux stickers, Linux.com stickers, as well as free ebooks: The SysAdmin’s Essential Guide to Linux Workstation Security, Practical GPL Compliance, A Guide to Understanding OPNFV & NFV, and the Open Source Guide Volume 1.

Be sure to check out these featured conference talks, including the Linux on the Mainframe session where John Mertic and Len Santalucia discuss how they’ve worked to create an open source, technical community where industry participants can collaborate around the use of the Linux and open source in a mainframe computing environment. And don’t miss ODPi’s session on the simplification and standardization of the Big Data ecosystem with common reference specifications and test suites.

Session Highlights

  • Accelerating Big Data Implementations For the Connected World – John Mertic
  • Advancing the Next-Generation Open Networking Stack – Phil Robb
  • Flatpak: The Portable, Secure Distribution of Desktop ApplicationsOwen Taylor
  • Intel: Core Linux Enabling Case Study and Demo
  • Integrating Linux Systems With Active Directory Using Open Source Tools – Dmitri Pal
  • Linux On the Mainframe: Linux Foundation and The Open Mainframe Project – John Mertic & Len Santalucia
  • Polyglot System Administration AKA: Don’t Fear the Other Language – Jakob Lorberblatt
  • The Next Evolution of The Javascript Ecosystem – Kris Borchers
  • The Revolution Will Not Be Distributed – Michael Hall
  • You Think You’re Not A Target? A Tale Of Three Developers – Chris Lamb

ODPi and Open Mainframe will also a have booth at All Things Open. Get your pass to All Things Open and stop by to learn more!