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Cloud computing is the cornerstone of the digital economy. Companies across industries now use the cloud — private, public or somewhere in between — to deliver their products and services.

A recent survey of industry analysis and research that we conducted for our 2016 Guide to the Open Cloud report produced overwhelming evidence of this.

Forty-one percent of all enterprise workloads are currently running in some type of public or private cloud, according to 451 Research. That number is expected to rise to 60 percent by mid-2018. And Rightscale reports that some 95 percent of companies are at least experimenting in the cloud. Enterprises are continuing to shift workloads to the cloud as their expertise and experience with the technology increases.

As we mentioned last week, companies in diverse industries — from banking and finance to automotive and healthcare — are facing the reality that they’re now in the technology business. In this new reality, cloud strategies can make or break an organization’s market success. And successful cloud strategies are built on Linux and open source software.

But what does that cloud strategy look like today and what will it look like in the future?

Short Term: Hybrid Cloud Architectures

While deployment and management remain a challenge, microservices architecture is now becoming mainstream. In a recent Nginx survey of 1,800 IT professionals, 44 percent said they’re using microservices in development or in production. Adoption was highest among small and medium-sized businesses. Not coincidentally, the use of public cloud is also predominant among SMBs, which are more nimble and faster to respond to market changes than large enterprises with legacy applications and significant on-premise infrastructure investments.   

Many reports tout hybrid cloud as a fast-growing segment of the cloud. Demand is growing at a compound rate of 27 percent, “far outstripping growth of the overall IT market,” according to researcher MarketsandMarkets. And IDC predicts that more than 80 percent of enterprise IT organizations will commit to hybrid cloud architectures by 2017.

However, hybrid cloud growth is happening predominantly among large enterprises with legacy applications and the budget and staffing to build private clouds. They turn to cloud for storage and scale-out capabilities, but keep most critical workloads on premise.  

In the mid-market, hybrid cloud adoption stands at less than 10 percent, according to 451 Research. Hybrid cloud is, then, a good transition point for legacy workloads and experimenting with cloud implementation. But it suffers from several challenges with more advanced cloud implementations, including management complexity and cost.

“Most organizations are already using a combination of cloud services from different cloud providers. While public cloud usage will continue to increase, the use of private cloud and hosted private cloud services is also expected to increase at least through 2017. The increased use of multiple public cloud providers, plus growth in various types of private cloud services, will create a multi-cloud environment in most enterprises and a need to coordinate cloud usage using hybrid scenarios.

“Although hybrid cloud scenarios will dominate, there are many challenges that inhibit working hybrid cloud implementations. Organizations that are not planning to use hybrid cloud indicated a number of concerns, including: integration challenges, application incompatibilities, a lack of management tools, a lack of common APIs and a lack of vendor support,” according to Gartner’s 2016 Public Cloud Services worldwide forecast.

Long term: Microservices on the Public Cloud

Over the long term, workloads are shifting away from hybrid cloud to a public cloud market dominated by providers like AWS, Azure, and Google Compute. “The share of enterprise workloads moved to the public cloud is expected to triple over the next five years,” from 16 percent to 41.3 percent of workloads runnin g in the public cloud, according to a recent JP Morgan survey of enterprise CIOs. Among this group, 13 percent said they view AWS as “intrinsic to future growth.”

By the end of 2016 the public cloud services market will reach $208.6 billion in revenue, growing by 172 percent from $178 billion in 2015, according to Gartner. Cloud application services (software-as-a-service or SaaS) is one of the largest segments of that and is expected to grow by 21.7 percent in 2016 to reach $38.9 billion while Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) is projected to see the most growth at 42.8 percent in 2016.

The public cloud itself is largely built on open source software. Offerings including Amazon EC2, Google Compute Engine and OpenStack are all built on open source technologies. They provide APIs that are well documented. They also provide a framework that is consistent enough to allow users to duplicate their infrastructure from one cloud to another without a significant amount of customization.

This allows for application portability, or the ability to move from one system to another without significant effort. The less complex the application the more likely that it can remain portable across cloud providers. And so the development practice that seems to be most suited for this is to abstract things into their simplest parts — a microservices architecture.

A whole new class of open source cloud computing projects has now begun to leverage the elasticity of the public cloud and enable applications designed and built to run on it. Organizations should become familiar with these open source projects, with which IT managers and practitioners can build, manage, and monitor their current and future mission-critical cloud resources.

Learn more about trends in open source cloud computing and see a list of the top open source cloud computing projects. Download The Linux Foundation’s Guide to the Open Cloud report today!

Read the other articles in the series:

4 Notable Trends in Open Source Cloud Computing

3 Emerging Cloud Technologies You Should Know

Why the Open Source Cloud Is Important

 

Some of the most successful public companies today are built around cloud-native applications — a fashionable term that simply means they’re designed to run in the cloud. Netflix, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Amazon have all leveraged open source components within a distributed, microservices-based architecture to quickly deliver new products and services that are cost-effective and responsive to market demands and changes.

By breaking applications up into microservices, or distinct, single-purpose services that are loosely coupled with dependencies and explicitly described through service endpoints, they have significantly increased the overall agility and maintainability of applications and used that to gain competitive advantage.

The rest of the market has scrambled to replicate this architecture and approach, cobbling together their own solutions using custom scripts and open source software — often using the open source versions of these web giants’ own infrastructure (i.e., Google’s Borg, which became Kubernetes; Twitter’s Mesos project, VMware’s Cloud Foundry, etc.).

This experimentation has set off a chain of innovation with four notable trends, still playing out today:

1. Increasing consumption of public cloud resources

2. Adoption of container technologies like Docker and others (Fifty-three percent of organizations are either investigating or using containers in development or in production, according to a recent Cloud Foundry report)

3. The rise of DevOps as the most effective method for application delivery in the cloud

4. An explosion in available open source tooling as user companies like Walmart and Capital One release their management software under open source licenses.

From banking and finance to automotive and healthcare, companies are facing the reality that they’re now in the technology business. In this new reality, cloud strategies can make or break an organization’s market success. And successful cloud strategies are built on Linux and open source software.

As cloud adoption grows, open source technologies will continue to be the source of innovation and the foundation for new markets and ecosystems. For each of the trends, above, there are open source projects actively involved in creating the future of IT infrastructure on which companies will deliver their products and services, in the coming year and beyond.

Organizations that wish to succeed should become familiar with these projects, the categories of technology in which they are influential, and the ways in which they can help companies remain competitive in this age of digital transformation.

In our next installment in this cloud series, we’ll discuss the trend toward microservices architectures and public cloud usage.

Learn more about trends in open source cloud computing and see a list of the top open source cloud computing projects. Download The Linux Foundation’s Guide to the Open Cloud report today!

Read the other articles in this series:

Trends in the Open Source Cloud: A Shift to Microservices and the Public Cloud

3 Emerging Cloud Technologies You Should Know

Why the Open Source Cloud Is Important

The Linux Foundation today released its third annual “Guide to the Open Cloud” report on current trends and open source projects in cloud computing.

The report aggregates and analyzes industry research to provide insights on how trends in containers, microservices, and more shape cloud computing today. It also defines the open source cloud and cloud native computing and discusses why the open cloud is important to just about every industry.

“From banking and finance to automotive and healthcare, companies are facing the reality that they’re now in the technology business. In this new reality, cloud strategies can make or break an organization’s market success. And successful cloud strategies are built on Linux and open source software,” according to the report.

A list of 75 projects at the end of the report serves as a directory for IT managers and practitioners looking to build, manage, and monitor their cloud resources. These are the projects to know about, try out, and contribute to in order to ensure your business stays competitive in the cloud.

The projects are organized into key categories of cloud infrastructure including IaaS, PaaS, virtualization, containers, cloud operating systems, DevOps, configuration management, logging and monitoring, software-defined networking (SDN), software-defined storage, and networking for containers.

New this year is the addition of a section on container management and automation tools, which is a hot area for development as companies race to fill the growing need to manage highly distributed, cloud-native applications. Traditional DevOps CI/CD tools have also been collected in a separate category, though functionality can overlap.

These additions reflect a movement toward the use of public cloud services and microservices architectures which is changing the nature of open source cloud computing.

“A whole new class of open source cloud computing projects has now begun to leverage the elasticity of the public cloud and enable applications designed and built to run on it,” according to the report.

To learn more about current trends in cloud computing and to see a full list of the most useful, influential, and promising open source cloud projects, download the report now.

Dice and The Linux Foundation recently released an updated Open Source Jobs Report that examines trends in open source recruiting and job seeking. The report clearly shows that open source professionals are in demand and that those with open source experience have a strong advantage when seeking jobs in the tech industry. Additionally, 87 percent of hiring managers say it’s hard to find open source talent.

The Linux Foundation offers many training courses to help you take advantage of these growing job opportunities. The courses range from basic to advanced and offer essential open source knowledge that you can learn at your own pace or through instructor-led classes.

This article looks at some of the available training courses and other resources that can provide the skills needed to stay competitive in this hot open source job market.  

Networking Courses            

The Open Source Jobs Report highlighted networking as a leading emergent technology — with 21 percent of hiring managers saying that networking has the biggest impact on open source hiring. To build these required networking skills, here are some courses to consider.

Essentials of System Administration

This introductory course will teach you how to administer, configure, and upgrade Linux systems. You’ll learn all the tools and concepts necessary to efficiently build and manage a production Linux infrastructure including networking, file system management, system monitoring, and performance tuning. This comprehensive, online, self-paced course also forms the basis for the Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator skillset.

Advanced Linux System Administration and Networking

The need for sys admins with advanced administration and networking skills has never been greater. This course is designed for system administrators and IT professionals who need to gain a hands-on knowledge of Linux network configuration and services as well as related topics such as basic security and performance.

Software Defined Networking with OpenDaylight

Software Defined Networking (SDN) is a rapidly emerging technology that abstracts networking infrastructure away from the actual physical equipment. This course is designed for experienced network administrators who are either migrating to or already using SDN and/or OpenDaylight, and it provides an overview of the principles and methods upon which this technology is built.

Cloud Courses

Cloud technology experience is even more sought after than networking skills — with 51 percent of hiring managers stating that knowledge of OpenStack and CloudStack has a big impact on open source hiring decisions.

Introduction to Cloud Infrastructure Technologies

As companies increasingly rely on cloud products and services, it can be overwhelming to keep up with all the technologies that are available. This free, self-paced course will give you a fundamental understanding of today’s top open source cloud technology options.

Essentials of OpenStack Administration

OpenStack adoption is expanding rapidly, and there is high demand for individuals with experience managing this cloud platform. This instructor-led course will teach you everything you need to know to create and manage private and public clouds with OpenStack.

OpenStack Administration Fundamentals

This online, self-paced course will teach you what you need to know to administer private and public clouds with OpenStack. This course is also excellent preparation for the Certified OpenStack Administrator exam from the OpenStack Foundation.

Open Source Licensing and Compliance

A good working knowledge of open source licensing and compliance is critical when contributing to open source projects or integrating open source software into other projects. The Compliance Basics for Developers course teaches software developers why copyrights and licenses are important and explains how to add this information appropriately. This course also provides an overview of the various types of licenses to consider.    

Along with these — and many other — training courses, the Linux Foundation also offers free webinars and ebooks on various topics. The free resources listed below can help you get started building your career in open source:

 

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