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Do you use or contribute to open source technologies? Or, are you responsible for hiring open source professionals? If so, please take a minute to complete a short open source jobs survey from Dice and The Linux Foundation and make your voice heard.

During the past decade, open source development has experienced a massive shift, becoming a mainstay of the IT industry. Flexibility in accommodating new technologies and adapting to a changing market make open source software vital to modern companies, which are increasingly investing in open source talent.

To gather more information about the changing landscape and opportunities for developers, administrators, managers, and other open source professionals, Dice and The Linux Foundation have partnered to produce two open source jobs surveys — designed specifically for hiring managers and industry professionals.

Take the Hiring Managers Survey

Take the Professionals/Candidates Survey 

As a token of our appreciation, $2,000 in Amazon gift cards will be awarded to survey respondents selected at random after the closing date. Complete the survey for a chance to win one of 10 $100 gift cards, or one of two $500 gift cards. 

The survey results will be compiled into the 2017 Open Source Jobs Report. This annual report evaluates the state of the job market for open source professionals and examines what hiring managers are looking for and what motivates employees in the industry. You can download the 2016 Open Source Jobs Report for free.  

Survey responses must be received by Thursday, July 27, at 12:00 pm Eastern time.

In previous excerpts of the new, self-paced Containers Fundamentals course from The Linux Foundation, we discussed what containers are and are not. Here, we’ll take a brief look at the history of containers, which includes chroot, FreeBSD jails, Solaris zones, and systemd-nspawn. 

Chroot was first introduced in 1979, during development of Seventh Edition Unix (also called Version 7), and was added to BSD in 1982. In 2000, FreeBSD extended chroot to FreeBSD Jails. Then, in the early 2000s, Solaris introduced the concept of zones, which virtualized the operating system services.

With chroot, you can change the apparent root directory for the currently running process and its children. After configuring chroot, subsequent commands will run with respect to the new root (/). With chroot, we can limit the processes only at the filesystem level, but they share the resources, like users, hostname, IP address, etc. FreeBSD Jails extended the chroot model by virtualizing users, network sub-systems, etc.

systemd-nspawn has not been around as long as chroot and Jails, but it can be used to create containers, which would be managed by systemd. On modern Linux operating systems, systemd is used as an init system to bootstrap the user space and manage all the processes subsequently.

This training course, presented mainly in video format, is aimed at those who are new to containers and covers the basics of container runtimes, container storage and networking, Dockerfiles, Docker APIs, and more.

You can learn more in the sample course video below, presented by Neependra Khare (@neependra), Founder and Principal Consultant at CloudYuga, Docker Captain, and author of the Docker Cookbook:

Want to learn more? Access all the free sample chapter videos now!

On Friday, April 28, The Linux Foundation will continue its new series of Twitter chats with leaders at the organization. This monthly activity, entitled #AskLF, gives the open source community a chance to ask upper management at questions about The Linux Foundation’s strategies and offerings.

#AskLF aims to increase access to the bright minds and community organizers within The Linux Foundation. While there are many opportunities to interact with staff at Linux Foundation global events, which bring together over 25,000 open source influencers, a live Twitter Q&A will give participants a direct line of communication to the designated hosts.

The second host (following Arpit Joshipura’s chat last month) will be Clyde Seepersad, the General Manager of Training and Certification since 2013. His #AskLF session will take place in the midst of many new training initiatives at the organization, including a new Inclusive Speaker Orientation and a Kubernetes Fundamentals course. @linuxfoundation followers are encouraged to ask Seepersad questions related to Linux Foundation courses, certifications, job prospects in the open source industry, and recent training developments.

Sample questions might include:

  • I’m new to open source but I want to work in the industry. How can a Linux Foundation Certification help me?

  • What are The Linux Foundation Training team’s support offerings like?

  • How will a Linux Foundation certification give me an advantage over other candidates with competitors’ certifications?

Here’s how you can participate in the first #AskLF:

  • Follow @linuxfoundation on Twitter: Hosts will take over The Linux Foundation’s account during the session.

  • Save the date: April 28, 2017 at 10 a.m. PT.

  • Use the hashtag #AskLF: To ask Clyde your questions while he hosts. Click here to spread the news of #AskLF with your Twitter community.

  • Be a n00b!: If you’ve been considering beginning a open source training journey, don’t be afraid to ask Clyde basic questions about The Linux Foundation’s methods, recommendations, or subjects covered. No inquiry is too basic!

More dates and details for future #AskLF sessions to come! We’ll see you on Twitter, April 28th at 10 a.m. PT.

More information on Linux Foundation Training can be found in the training blog via Linux.com:

https://www.linux.com/learn/training

Hear Clyde’s thoughts on why Linux Foundation certifications give you a competitive advantage in this on-demand webinar:

No More Excuses: Why You Need to Get Certified Now

*note: unlike Reddit-style AMAs, #AskLF is not focused around general topics that might pertain to the host’s personal life. To participate, please focus your questions around open source networking and Clyde Seepersad’s career.

The Linux Foundation is proud to support this year’s State of the Developer Nation Survey run by our friends at VisionMobile. This is the 12th developer survey, focusing on a 360 view of developer tools, skills, and salaries.

Take the survey now!

The survey features questions on topics like programming languages, platforms, app categories, new technologies, revenue models, IoT verticals — and of course — tools. It’s a survey made by developers, so the questions will be relevant, plus you will get to learn something new. It only takes 15 minutes!

Once you complete the survey, you’ll get to find out what kind of character you’d be in a fantasy world, based on your responses: A mage? A fighter? A dragon slayer? Take the survey and find out!

Participants can win prizes including a MeccaNoid G15 KS, an Apple Watch Series 2, an Oculus Rift headset, a Pixel Phone, Udemy courses, and more.

VisionMobile will show you how your responses compare to other developers’ in your country. You’ll also be the first to receive the State of the Developer Nation report (due out February 2017) based on key survey findings.

Key findings from last year’s survey include:

  • 47 percent of professional developers now consider Android their primary platform.

  • Developers that primarily target Linux or Mac OS on the desktop are extremely unlikely to use C# on the server. Just 2 percent of Linux-first developers and 3 percent of those who prefer macOS are primarily using C# for their backend.

  • Smart Home is not just the biggest IoT vertical in terms of developer interest, with 48% targeting it, but also the fastest growing – up 6 percentage points in the last year.

Take the survey now! The last day to submit your response is Dec. 23, 2016.