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OPNFV

The OPNFV project provides users with open source technology they can use and tailor for their purposes; learn how to get involved.

Over the past several weeks, we have been discussing the Understanding OPNFV book (see links to previous articles below). In this last article in the series, we will look at why you should care about the project and how you can get involved.

OPNFV provides both tangible and intangible benefits to end users. Tangible benefits include those that directly impact business metrics, whereas the intangibles include benefits that speed up the overall NFV transformation journey but are harder to measure. The nature of the OPNFV project, where it primarily focuses on integration and testing of upstream projects and adds carrier-grade features to these upstream projects, can make it difficult to understand these benefits.

To understand this more clearly, let’s go back to the era before OPNFV. Open source projects do not, as a matter of routine, perform integration and testing with other open source projects. So, the burden of taking multiple disparate projects and making the stack work for NFV primarily fell on Communications Service Providers (CSPs), although in some cases vendors shouldered part of the burden. For CSPs or vendors to do the same integration and testing didn’t make sense.

Furthermore, upstream communities are often horizontal in their approach and do not investigate or prioritize requirements for a particular industry vertical. In other words, there was no person or entity driving carrier grade features in many of these same upstream projects. OPNFV was created to fill these gaps.

Tangible and Intangible Benefits

With this background, OPNFV benefits become more clear. Chapter 10 of the book breaks down the tangible and intangible benefits further. Tangible benefits to CSPs include:

  • Faster rollout of new network services
  • Vendor-agnostic platform to onboard and certify VNFs
  • Stack based on best-in-class open source components
  • Reduced vendor lock-in
  • Ability to drive relevant features in upstream projects

Additionally, the OPNFV community operates using DevOps principles and is organized into small, independent and distributed teams. In doing so, OPNFV embodies many of the same practices used by the web giants. CSPs can gain valuable insight into people and process changes required for NFV transformation by engaging with OPNFV. These intangible benefits include insights into:

  • Organizational changes
  • Process changes
  • Technology changes
  • Skillset acquisition

OPNFV is useful not only for CSPs, however; it also provides benefits to vendors (technology providers) and individuals. Vendors can benefit from interoperability testing (directly if their products are open source, or indirectly through private testing or plugfests), and gain insights into carrier-grade requirements and industry needs. Individuals can improve their skills by gaining broad exposure to open source NFV. Additionally, users can learn how to organize their teams and retool their processes for successful NFV transformation.

The primary objective of the OPNFV project is to provide users with open source technology they can use and tailor for their purposes, and the Understanding OPNFV book covers the various aspects to help you get started with and get the most out of OPNFV. The last section of the book also explains how  you might get involved with OPNFV and provides links to additional OPNFV resources.

Want to learn more? You can download the Understanding OPNFV ebook in PDF (in English or Chinese), or order a printed version on Amazon. Or you can check out the previous blogs:

Mauro Carvalho Chehab answers a few questions about his work on the Linux kernel.

According to the recent Linux Kernel Development Report, the Linux operating system runs 90 percent of the public cloud workload, has 62 percent of the embedded market share, and 100 percent of the TOP500 supercomputers. It also runs 82 percent of the world’s smartphones and nine of the top ten public clouds. However, the sustained growth of this open source ecosystem would not be possible without the steady development of the Linux kernel.

In this series, we are highlighting the ongoing work of some Linux kernel contributors. Here, Mauro Carvalho Chehab, Open Source Director at Samsung Research Brazil, answers a few questions about his work on the kernel.

Linux Foundation: What role do you play in the community and what subsystem(s) do you work on?

I’m responsible for the Open Source efforts at Samsung Research Brazil, as part of Samsung’s Open Source Group. I maintain the media and EDAC (Error Detection and Correction) kernel subsystems.

Linux Foundation: What have you been working on this year?

This year, I did a lot of patches that improves Linux documentation. A lot of them were related to the conversion from the XML-based DocBook docs to a markup language (Restructured Text). Thanks to that, no documents use the legacy document system anymore. I also finally closed the documentation gap at the DVB API, with was out of sync for more than 10 years! I also did several bug fixes at the media subsystem, including the 4.9 breakage of many drivers that were doing DMA via stack.

Linux Foundation: What do you think the kernel community needs to work on in the upcoming year?

We should continue our work to support new device drivers and get rid of out of tree stuff. At the media subsystem, we should work to add support for newer TV standards, like ATSC version 3 and to improve support for embedded systems, on both DVB and V4L2 APIs.

Linux Foundation: Why do you contribute to the Linux kernel?

Because it is fun! Seriously, I strongly believe that the innovation process on computer engineering is currently driven by Linux. Working on its kernel has provided me the opportunity of working with great developers and helping to improve the top operating system.

You can learn more about the Linux kernel development process and read more developer profiles in the full report. Download the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report now.

[vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]1. LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen China
Developers, architects, sysadmins, DevOps experts, business leaders, and other professionals gathered in June to discuss open source technology and trends at the first-ever LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen (LC3) event in China. At the event, Linus Torvalds spoke about how Linux still surprises and motivates him.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23077″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]2. Toyota Camry Will Feature Automotive Grade Linux
At Automotive Linux Summit in Japan, Dan Cauchy, Executive Director of Automotive Grade Linux (AGL), announced that Toyota has adopted the AGL platform for their next-generation infotainment system.The 2018 Camry will be the first Toyota vehicle on the market with the AGL-based system in the United States.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23078″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]3. Open Source Summit Debuts
As announced at last year’s LinuxCon in Toronto, this annual event hosted by The Linux Foundation is now called Open Source Summit. It combines LinuxCon, ContainerCon, and CloudOpen conferences along with two new conferences: Open Community Conference and Diversity Empowerment Summit.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23079″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]4. Joseph Gordon-Levitt at OS Summit North America
Actor Joseph Gordon-Levitt, founder and director of the online production company HITRECORD, spoke at Open Source Summit in Los Angeles about his experiences with collaborative technologies. Gordon-Levitt shared lessons learned along with a video created through the company.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23080″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]5. Diversity Empowerment Summit
Tameika Reed, founder of Women in Linux, spoke at the Diversity Empowerment Summit in Los Angeles about the need for diversity in all facets of tech, including education, training, conferences, and mentoring. The new event aims to help promote and facilitate an increase in diversity, inclusion, empowerment, and social innovation in the open source community.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23081″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]6. Hyperledger Growth
Hyperledger — the largest open blockchain consortium — now includes 180 diverse organizations and has recently partnered with edX to launch an online MOOC. At Open Source Summit in Los Angeles, Executive Director Brian Behlendorf spoke with theCUBE about the project’s growth and potential to solve important problems.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23082″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]7. Lyft and Uber on Stage at Open Source Summit
At Open Source Summit in Los Angeles, ride-sharing rivals Lyft and Uber appeared on stage to introduce two new projects donated to the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. Chris Lambert, CTO of Lyft (on left), and Yuri Shkuro, Staff Engineer at Uber, introduced the projects, which help CNCF fill some gaps in the landscape of technologies used to adopt a cloud-native computing model.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23083″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]8. Attendee Reception at Paramount Studios
The Open Source Summit North America evening reception for all attendees was held at iconic Paramount Studios in Hollywood. Attendees enjoyed a behind-the-scenes studio tour featuring authentic Paramount movie props and costumes.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23084″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]9. 2017 Linux Kernel Summit and Kernel Development Report
Open source technologists gathered in the city of Prague, Czech Republic in October for Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference Europe. Co-located events included MesosCon Europe, KVM Forum, and Linux Kernel Summit, where The Linux Foundation released the latest Linux Kernel Development Report highlighting some of the dedicated kernel contributors.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23085″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]10. The Next Generation of Open Source Technologists
The Linux Foundation 2017 events aimed to inspire the younger generation with an interest in open source technologies through activities like Kids Day and special keynotes, such as those from 13-year-old algorithmist and cognitive developer Tanmay Bakshi, 11-year-old hacker and cybersecurity ambassador Reuben Paul (pictured here), and 15-year-old programmer and technologist Keila Banks.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][image_with_animation image_url=”23086″ alignment=”” animation=”Fade In” box_shadow=”none” max_width=”100%”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]You can look forward to more exciting events in 2018. Check out the newly released 2018 Events calendar and make plans now to attend or to speak at an upcoming conference.

Speaking proposals are now being accepted for the following 2018 events:

Submit a Proposal[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Autodesk is undergoing a company-wide shift to open source and inner source. And that’s on top of the culture change that both development methods require.

Autodesk is undergoing a company-wide shift to open source and inner source. And that’s on top of the culture change that both development methods require.

Inner source means applying open source development practices and methodologies to internal projects, even if the projects are proprietary. And the culture change required to be successful can be a hard shift from a traditional corporate hierarchy to an open approach. Even though they’re connected, all three changes are distinct heavy lifts.

They began by hiring Guy Martin as Director of Open Source Strategy in the Engineering Practice at Autodesk, which was designed to transform engineering across the company. Naturally, open source would play a huge role in that effort, including spurring the use of inner source. But neither would flourish if the company culture didn’t change. And so the job title swiftly evolved to Director of Open @ADSK at the company.

“I tend to focus a lot more on the culture change and the inner source part of my role even though I’m working through a huge compliance initiative right now on the open source side,” Martin said.

The history of Autodesk’s open source transformation began shortly after the shift of all its products to cloud began, including its AutoCAD architecture software, building information modeling with its Revit products, as well as  its media and entertainment products. The company’s role in open source in entertainment is now so significant that Martin often speaks at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences on open source. They want to hear about what  Autodesk is doing as part of a larger collection of initiatives that the Academy is working on, Martin said.

At Autodesk, the goal is to spring engineers loose from their business silos and create a fully open source, cloud-centric company.

“Your primary identity detaches from being part of the AutoCAD team or part of the Revit team, or the 3ds Max or Inventor team or any of these products,” Martin explained. “It’s now shaping you into part of the Autodesk engineering team, and not your individual silo as a product organization in the company.”

Talent acquisition is among the top business goals for Open@Autodesk, especially given the company’s intense focus on innovation as well as making all of its products work seamlessly together. It takes talent skilled in open source methodologies and thinking to help make that happen. But it also means setting up the team dynamics so collaboration is more natural and less forced.

“With company cultures and some engineering cultures, the freedom to take an unconventional route to solve a problem doesn’t exist,” Martin said. “A lot of my job is to create that freedom so that smart and motivated engineers can figure out a way to put things together in a way that maybe they wouldn’t have thought of without that freedom and that culture.”

To help create an open source culture, the right tools must be in place and, oddly enough, those tools sometimes aren’t open source. For example, Martin created a single instance of Slack rather than use IRC, because Slack was more comfortable for users in other lines of the business who were already using it. The intent was to get teams to start talking across their organizational boundaries.

Another tool Martin is working with is Bitergia Analytics to monitor and manage Autodesk’s use of GitHub Enterprise.

Martin says the three key lessons he’s learned as an open source program manager are:

  1. Stay flexible because change happens
  2. Be humble but bold
  3. Be passionate.

“I’ve been at Autodesk two years but I’m still bootstrapping some of the things around culture. We have strong contributors in some projects, while in some projects we’re consuming. I think you have to do both, especially if you’re bootstrapping a new open source effort in a company. ”

“The challenge is always balancing the needs of the product teams, who have to get a product out the door, and who (and as an engineer I can say this) will take shortcuts whenever possible. They want to know, ‘why should we be doing this for the community? All we care about is our stuff.’ And it’s getting them past that. Yes, we’re doing work that’s going to be used elsewhere, but in the end we’re going to get benefits from pulling work from other people who have done work that they knew was going to be used in the community.”

The Linux Kernel Development Report, which was recently released by The Linux Foundation, sheds light on various aspects of the development process as well as on who is doing the work. According to the report, more than 85 percent of all kernel development is done by developers who are being paid for their work. Additionally, the overall number of companies involved in working toward the improvement of the kernel is increasing, with the top 30 companies contributing to the Linux kernel shown in the table at right.

The report states:

What we see here is that a small number of companies is responsible for a large portion of the total changes to the kernel. But there is a “long tail” of companies (nearly 500 of which do not appear in the above list) which have made significant changes since the 4.7 release. There may be no other examples of such a large, common resource being supported by such a large group of independent actors in such a collaborative way.

Jens Axboe, Software Engineer at Facebook

In this article, Jens Axboe, Software Engineer at Facebook, answers a few questions about how and why he contributes to the Linux kernel.

The Linux Foundation: What role do you play in the community and what subsystem(s) do you work on?

Jens Axboe: I’m the Linux block layer maintainer, so I primarily develop features in that area, as well as help review and guide others doing the same.

The Linux Foundation: What have you been working on this year?

Axboe: This year, I contributed an IO scheduler framework for the block multiqueue subsystem, support for allowing applications to inform the kernel of life time of writes, and much faster IO accounting for blk-mq.   

Since 4.8, I have contributed about 200 patches. In terms of features, the most interesting, which are not mentioned above, are probably writeback throttling (blk-wbt), IO polling for fast devices (both classic and hybrid/efficient modes), and more efficient O_DIRECT.

The Linux Foundation: What do you think the kernel community needs to work on in the upcoming year?

Axboe: Attracting more young talent. Most young folks these days gravitate towards product instead of infrastructure. It’s important that we bring new talent into the fold.

The Linux Foundation: Why do you contribute to the Linux kernel?

Axboe: First of all, because I enjoy the work. It’s challenging and fun, plus there’s a personal gratification knowing that your code is running on billions of devices. Finally, it’s my job.

You can learn more about the Linux kernel development process and read more developer profiles in the full report. Download the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report now.

An important step in using open source code effectively is setting explicit guidelines to be followed.

Open source programs at organizations of all sizes are fueling innovation, and many program leaders are quickly learning that weaving open source code into projects — and creating new projects — require informed guidelines and best practices. Organizations are often leveraging existing open source code to build their own commercial products and services, and contributing back to projects.

However, diving in and using open source code without an understanding of everything from legal risks to best development practices is perilous. Approaching open source code usage without best practices in place can also tarnish an organization’s reputation. That’s where the free, new Using Open Source Code guide comes in. It can help you craft and codify a comprehensive strategy.

One of the most important steps in using open source code effectively within your program is to set explicit guidelines to be followed, which are often summarized in a strategy document. What if code comes into one of your projects from a project with a different licensing setup? What acceptance, rejection, and exception policies should developers follow? What is your organization’s overall stance toward open source development?

These are all among the questions that need concrete answers as you codify your strategy, and there are more questions involving the ecosystem that applies to using open source code. How are APIs documented? Have you laid out a Contributor Licensing Agreement that everyone can use? Have you picked the right license for your project? Your strategy document should be specific about best practices, APIs and more.

“A well-designed open source compliance process should simultaneously ensure compliance with the terms of open source licenses and also help companies protect their own intellectual property and that of third-party suppliers from unintended disclosure and/or other consequences,” notes Ibrahim Haddad, Vice President of R&D and Head of the Open Source Group at Samsung Research America.

Creating a Policy

As the guide notes, creating a strategy document featuring best practices does not need to be complicated. A good open source usage policy includes six simple rules:

  • Engineers must receive approval from the OSRB before integrating any open source code in a product.
  • Software received from third parties must be audited to identify any open source code included, which ensures license obligations can be fulfilled before a product ships.
  • All software must be audited and reviewed, including all proprietary software components.
  • Products must fulfill open source licensing obligations prior to customer receipt.
  • Approval for using a given open source component in one product is not approval for another deployment, even if the open source component is the same.
  • All changed components must go through the approval process.

Importantly, the guide also notes the importance of effective code review practices. “If your code review process is overly burdensome, you’ll slow innovation or provide a good excuse for developers to circumvent the process completely,” Haddad emphasizes.

Additionally, Haddad, advises that circumspect code usage and compliance practices must be ongoing. “It’s important to remember that open source compliance doesn’t stop with version 1.0,” he said.

The Using Open Source Code guide can help you with everything from licensing issues to best development practices, and it explores how to seamlessly and safely weave open components into your open source projects. It is one of a new collection of free guides from The Linux Foundation and The TODO Group that are all extremely valuable for any organization running an open source program. The guides are available now to help you run an open source program office where open source is supported, shared, and leveraged. With such an office, organizations can establish and execute on their open source strategies efficiently, with clear terms.

These guides were produced based on expertise from open source leaders. Check out the guides and stay tuned for our continuing coverage.

Also, don’t miss the previous articles in the series:

How to Create an Open Source Program

Tools for Managing Open Source Programs

Measuring Your Open Source Program’s Success

Effective Strategies for Recruiting Open Source Developers

A Free Guide to Participating in Open Source Communities

Read about featured Linux kernel developers in the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report.

The recent Linux Kernel Development Report released by The Linux Foundation, included information about several featured Linux kernel developers. According to the report, roughly 15,600 developers from more than 1,400 companies have contributed to the Linux kernel since 2005, when the adoption of Git made detailed tracking possible. Over the next several weeks, we will be highlighting some specific Linux kernel developers who agreed to answer a few questions about what they do and why they contribute to the kernel.

Linux kernel developer

Laura Abbott, a Fedora Kernel Engineer at Red Hat

In this article, we feature Laura Abbott, a Fedora Kernel Engineer at Red Hat.

The Linux Foundation: What role do you play in the community and what subsystem(s) do you work on?

Laura Abbott: My full-time job is working as one of two maintainers for the Fedora kernels. This means I push out kernel releases and fix/shepherd bugs. Outside of that role, I maintain the Ion memory management framework and do occasional work on arm/arm64 and KSPP (kernel hardening).

The Linux Foundation: What have you been working on this year?

Abbott: I did some major reworking on Ion this year and ripped out a lot of code (everyone’s favorite type of patch!). Hopefully, I’ll be able to report that Ion is out of staging in the next kernel report. Apart from that, I’ve spent a lot of time testing and reviewing patches for kernel hardening.

The Linux Foundation: What do you think the kernel community needs to work on in the upcoming year?

Abbott: As a general theme, there needs to be a focus on scaling the community. There’s always an ongoing discussion about how to attract new developers and there’s been a recent focus on how to grow contributors into maintainers. There’s still a lot of ‘tribal knowledge’ in pretty much every area which makes things difficult for everyone. I’d like to see the kernel community continue to make processes easier for new and existing developers. I’d also like to see the discussions about building an inclusive community continue.

The Linux Foundation: Why do you contribute to the Linux kernel?

Abbott: I’ve always found low-level systems fascinating and enjoy seeing how all the pieces work together. There’s always something new to learn about in the kernel, and I find the work challenging.

You can learn more about the Linux kernel development process and read more developer profiles in the full report. Download the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report now.

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OS Summit keynotes

Watch keynotes and technical sessions from OS Summit and ELC Europe here.

If you weren’t able to attend Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) Europe last week, don’t worry! We’ve recorded keynote presentations from both events and all the technical sessions from ELC Europe to share with you here.

Check out the on-stage conversation with Linus Torvalds and VMware’s Dirk Hohndel, opening remarks from The Linux Foundation’s Executive Director Jim Zemlin, and a special presentation from 11-year-old CyberShaolin founder Reuben Paul. You can watch these and other ELC and OS Summit keynotes below for insight into open source collaboration, community and technical expertise on containers, cloud computing, embedded Linux, Linux kernel, networking, and much more.

And, you can watch all 55+ technical sessions from Embedded Linux Conference here.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video link=”http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLQZzEvavGs&list=PLbzoR-pLrL6pISWAq-1cXP4_UZAyRtesk&index=1″][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video 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The 2017 Linux Kernel Report illustrates the kernel development process and highlights the work of some of the dedicated developers creating the largest collaborative project in the history of computing.

Roughly 15,600 developers from more than 1,400 companies have contributed to the Linux kernel since 2005, when the adoption of Git made detailed tracking possible, according to the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report released at the Linux Kernel Summit in Prague.

This report — co-authored by Jonathan Corbet, Linux kernel developer and editor of LWN.net, and Greg Kroah-Hartman, Linux kernel maintainer and Linux Foundation fellow — illustrates the kernel development process and highlights the work of some of the dedicated developers who are creating the largest collaborative project in the history of computing.

Jens Axboe, Linux block maintainer and software engineer at Facebook, contributes to the kernel because he enjoys the work. “It’s challenging and fun, plus there’s a personal gratification knowing that your code is running on billions of devices,” he said.

The 2017 report covers development work completed through Linux kernel 4.13, with an emphasis on releases 4.8 to 4.13. During this reporting period, an average of 8.5 changes per hour were accepted into the kernel; this is a significant increase from the 7.8 changes seen in the previous report.

Here are other highlights from the report:

  • Since the last report, more than 4,300 developers from over 500 companies have contributed to the kernel.
  • 1,670 of these developers contributed for the first time — about a third of contributors.
  • The most popular area for new developers to make their first patch is the “staging tree,” which is a place for device drivers that are not yet ready for inclusion in the kernel proper.
  • The top 10 organizations sponsoring Linux kernel development since the last report are Intel, Red Hat, Linaro, IBM, Samsung, SUSE, Google, AMD, Renesas, and Mellanox.

Kernel developer Julia Lawall, Senior Researcher at Inria, works on the Coccinelle tool that’s used to find bugs in the Linux kernel. She contributes to the kernel for many reasons, including “the potential impact, the challenge of understanding a huge code base of low-level code, and the chance to interact with a community with a very high level of technical skill.”

You can learn more about the Linux kernel development process and read more developer profiles in the full report. Download the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report now.

 

All Things Open

Join The Linux Foundation at All Things Open; check out conference highlights below. (Image: All Things Open)

Going to All Things Open in Raleigh? While you’re there, be sure stop by The Linux Foundation training booth for fun giveaways and a chance to win one of two Raspberry Pi kits. Two winners will be chosen onsite on the last day of the conference, Oct. 24, at 3:05pm.

Other booth giveaways include The Linux Foundation branded webcam covers, The Linux Foundation projects’ stickers, Tux stickers, Linux.com stickers, as well as free ebooks: The SysAdmin’s Essential Guide to Linux Workstation Security, Practical GPL Compliance, A Guide to Understanding OPNFV & NFV, and the Open Source Guide Volume 1.

Be sure to check out these featured conference talks, including the Linux on the Mainframe session where John Mertic and Len Santalucia discuss how they’ve worked to create an open source, technical community where industry participants can collaborate around the use of the Linux and open source in a mainframe computing environment. And don’t miss ODPi’s session on the simplification and standardization of the Big Data ecosystem with common reference specifications and test suites.

Session Highlights

  • Accelerating Big Data Implementations For the Connected World – John Mertic
  • Advancing the Next-Generation Open Networking Stack – Phil Robb
  • Flatpak: The Portable, Secure Distribution of Desktop ApplicationsOwen Taylor
  • Intel: Core Linux Enabling Case Study and Demo
  • Integrating Linux Systems With Active Directory Using Open Source Tools – Dmitri Pal
  • Linux On the Mainframe: Linux Foundation and The Open Mainframe Project – John Mertic & Len Santalucia
  • Polyglot System Administration AKA: Don’t Fear the Other Language – Jakob Lorberblatt
  • The Next Evolution of The Javascript Ecosystem – Kris Borchers
  • The Revolution Will Not Be Distributed – Michael Hall
  • You Think You’re Not A Target? A Tale Of Three Developers – Chris Lamb

ODPi and Open Mainframe will also a have booth at All Things Open. Get your pass to All Things Open and stop by to learn more!