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Open Source Summit EU

Going to Open Source Summit? Check out some featured conference presentations and activities below.

Going to Open Source Summit EU in Prague? While you’re there, be sure stop by The Linux Foundation training booth for fun giveaways and a chance to win one of three Raspberry Pi kits.

Giveaways include The Linux Foundation branded webcam covers, The Linux Foundation projects’ stickers, Tux stickers, Linux.com stickers, as well as free ebooks: The SysAdmin’s Essential Guide to Linux Workstation Security, Practical GPL Compliance, and A Guide to Understanding OPNFV & NFV.

You can also enter the raffle for a chance to win a Raspberry Pi Kit. There will be 3 raffle winners: names will be drawn and prizes will be mailed on Nov. 2.

And, be sure to check out some featured conference presentations below, including how to deploy Kubernetes native applications, deploying and scaling microservices, opportunities for inclusion and collaboration, and how to build your open source career.

Session Highlights

  • Love What You Do, Everyday! – Zaheda Bhorat, Amazon Web Services
  • Detecting Performance Regressions In The Linux Kernel – Jan Kara, SUSE
  • Highway to Helm: Deploying Kubernetes Native Applications – Michelle Noorali, Microsoft
  • Deploying and Scaling Microservices with Docker and Kubernetes – Jérôme Petazzoni, Docker
  • printk() – The Most Useful Tool is Now Showing its Age – Steven Rostedt, VMWare
  • Every Day Opportunities for Inclusion and Collaboration – Nithya Ruff, Comcast

Activities

  • Technical Showcase
  • Real-Time Summit
  • Free Day with Prague tour from local students
  • KVM Forum
  • FOSSology – Hands On Training
  • Tracing Summit

The Cloud Native Computing Foundation will also a have booth at OSSEU. Get your pass to Open Source Summit Europe and stop by to learn more! Use discount OSSEULFM20 code for 20% off your all-access attendee pass.

Check out the full list of co-located events on the website and register now.

API

Learn the basics of using REST APIs at the upcoming APIStrat conference.

APIs are becoming a very popular and are a must-know for every type of developer. But, what is an API? API stands for Application Programming Interface. It is a way to get one software application to talk to another software application. In this article, I’ll go over the basics of what they are and why to use them.

Nom Nom Nom! I happened to be snacking on chips while trying to think of a name for my REST API talk coming up at APIStrat in Portland. Similarly, the act of consuming or using a REST API means to eat it all up. In context, it means to eat it, swallow it, and digest it — leaving any others in the pile exposed. Sounds yummy, right?

It seems that every application out there is hungry for an API. Let’s look at Yelp for example. Yelp by itself won’t have the functionality you’d expect. In order to search nearby restaurants or locations, it needs to use an API for a map. It uses the Google API. With that, you can locate nearest places and get directions to the place. APIs allow you to integrate one tool into another tool to give it more functionality. Without the ability to make these types of integrations, you can say goodbye to a majority of all the apps out there that you use!

So why are APIs so important? Most companies today have several different software applications they need to use, including sales, accounting, CRM, a project management system, etc. To have the software all work together is increasingly important for financial reasons, which is also making work processes flow more easily. Companies can also create their own tools using other APIs to enhance their own software, making their customers happier and giving them the tools they need.

API Basics

Back in 2000, the very first API came from eBay. Since then, they have increased exponentially. In 2016, more than 50 million API requests have been made, and there are 30,000 available APIs out there. From 2015 to 2016, the number has doubled in growth from 15,000 to 30,000 APIs!

In my talk, I will be covering API basics, how to make API requests, how APIs are made, and much more.  I will show you how you can use POSTMAN to test making REST API calls, so that you will leave with the skills to make REST calls on any API. This talk is designed for any audience level. If you are brand new to programming, that’s fine. If you are an experienced programmer that currently uses APIs but want to go back into the basics to understand the breakdown of how APIs work, then that is fine, too!

If you want to learn more, be sure to check out my other talk at APIStrat:  “Chatbots are the Future: Let’s Build One!” In this talk, I will go over how to build a working Chatbot using the Cisco Spark API, which is a collaboration API for chat (messages), calling, and video. You don’t need to install or download anything to prepare. I will cover everything in the presentation, and it is designed for everyone to follow along. I guarantee you will have a working chatbot by the end of the presentation.

You can learn more at the upcoming APIStrat conference

Testing is especially important in modern distributed software systems. Learn more at the upcoming APIStrat conference.

As developers, we often hear that tests are important. Automated testing minimizes the number of bugs released to production, helps prevent regression, improves code quality, supplements documentation, and makes code reviews easier. In short, tests save businesses money by increasing system uptime and keeping developers working on new features instead of fighting fires. While software testing has been around for about as long as software has, I would argue that testing is especially important (and unfortunately more challenging) in modern distributed software systems.

Distributed software” refers to any software that is not run entirely on one computer. Almost all web applications are distributed software as they rely on applications on other servers (eg: remote data stores, internal REST APIs, third-party APIs, content delivery networks, etc.), and most mobile and desktop applications are as well. Distributed software presents new challenges and requires a thoughtful approach to testing. This list includes just some of the reasons that testing is crucial for distributed software:

1. Third Party APIs Can Change Unexpectedly

We would like to think that every REST API we use will adhere to some form of versioning, but this doesn’t always happen. Sometimes APIs break when a maintainer fixes a bug, sometimes breaking changes are overlooked, and sometimes the API just isn’t mature or stable yet. With more companies releasing public APIs, we’re bound to see the number of accidentally breaking releases rise, and tests are a great way to prevent those breaking changes from affecting our applications.

2. Internal API Changes can Affect Your App in Unexpected Ways

Even more commonly, breaking API changes come from within our own organization. For the past few years, I’ve been working with startups where the business requirements change almost as fast as we can implement them, so our internal APIs are rarely stable and sometimes the documentation gets outdated. Slowing down, improving communication between team-members, and writing tests for our internal APIs has helped.

3. Remotely Distributed Open Source Packages are More Popular Than Ever

78% of companies are now running on some form of open source software. This has helped the speed and ease of developing software to increase exponentially, but blindly relying on open source packages has bitten plenty of developers as well (see the left-pad incident of 2016). Once again, we hope that open source packages use semantic versioning, but it’s impossible to guarantee this. Testing the boundaries between packages and our software is one way to help improve reliability.

4. Network Connections Aren’t Perfect

In many server-to-server cases, network connections are pretty reliable, but when you start serving up data to a browser or mobile client via an API, it gets much harder to guarantee a connection. In either case, you should have a plan for failure: Does your app break? Throw an error? Retry gracefully? Adding tests that simulate a bad network connection can be a huge help in minimizing poor user experiences or data loss.

5. Siloed Teams can Lead to Communication Gaps

One of the advantages to distributed systems is that a team can be assigned to each component. This allows each team to become an expert on just one part of the system, enabling the scaling of software organizations like we see at Amazon. The downside to these siloed teams is that communication becomes more difficult, but a good test suite, thorough documentation, and self-documenting APIs can help minimize these gaps.

How Do We Test Distributed Systems?

Distributed software has become more popular as the cost of cloud computing has gone down and network connections have become more reliable. While distributed systems offer unique advantages for scaling and cost savings, they introduce new challenges for testing.

Borrowing from some of Martin Fowler’s ideas on testing microservices and my own experience building layered test plans, I’ll be presenting a strategy for testing distributed systems at this year’s API Strategy & Practice Conference. If you’re interested in learning more about the topic of testing distributed software, or you have questions, you can find me at the conference, or anytime on Twitter.

Learn more at APIStrategy and Practice Conference.

 

The upcoming APIStrat conference – Oct. 31-Nov. 2 in Portland – features three days of technical sessions, keynotes, and workshops.

The API Strategy & Practice conference (APIStrat) – taking place Oct. 31 through Nov. 2 in Portland – features three days of technical sessions, keynotes, and more, including several workshops providing hands-on learning opportunities. These sessions cover topics such as RESTful API integration, OpenID Connect, API security, and REST API testing.

Check out the following workshops happening at APIStrat:

Connect Your RESTful API to Hundreds of Others in Minutes (Zapier and other Integration Platforms) – Sean Matthews, Left Hook Digital

In this workshop, the Left Hook team will show how to connect your app to hundreds of others on Zapier’s platform in a matter of minutes. We’ll walk you through a quick integration, and then talk about the pros and cons of 30+ different integration platforms out there, as well as highlighting platforms upon which developers can build out their own API connectors today.

Creating Communication Applications using the Asterisk RESTFul Interface (ARI) – Chris Howard, Digium

The Asterisk RESTFul Interface (ARI) is an asynchronous API that lets developers build communications applications by exposing the raw primitive objects in Asterisk – channels, bridges, endpoints, media, etc. This presentation will provide information on getting started using ARI and provide a working demonstration of using the ARI to create a telephone application.

From 0 to  000s – Starting and Growing your Developer Program – Caroline Lewko, WIP

Learn the basics of starting a developer program from segmentation and polishing your personas, along with the seven most important onboarding activities. We will also include some extra special super sensory developer experience techniques.   

How Mature are You? A Developer Experience Maturity Model – Jenny Wanger, Arity, founded by Allstate

At Arity, we developed a maturity model for API programs to help you focus your time and effort on the areas that will provide the greatest value for your customers. We’ll go through the model together so you can score your company’s program. You’ll leave the session with a score and roadmap of how this can help you influence your stakeholders.

OpenID Connect Done the Right Way – Vinay Bhalerao, Red Hat

With the rise of mobile applications, OpenID Connect adoption has increased in the API market and is the preferred choice in API security. This workshop will help people to understand the differences between OAuth, JWT, and openID Connect and when to use the respective flows.

OWASP’s Latest Category – API Underprotection – Skip Hovsmith, CriticalBlue

In this workshop, you’ll learn about potential threats resulting from undersecured web APIs. You should gain a good understanding of the underprotected API problem, learn practical tips to improve your API security posture, and gain a sense of emerging tools and technologies that enable a significant step change in API security.

Simplify and Scale Your Connections To Data – William Broza, BitScoop Labs

The BitScoop platform radically simplifies data integration and streamlines the data and services development process with unified access to APIs, microservices, and more. Learn how to unify all internal and external data in your ecosystem under one API or SDK using our powerful and feature-rich iPaaS.

Starting with GTK – Julita Inca, UNI

GTK is a toolkit to create GUIs based on C program language. Glib and clutter are other technologies involved with GTK, and in this workshop, we’ll look at interactions with databases that support Linux (Fedora 25), such as SQLite or PostgreSQL. We can achieve at least four forms with an interaction of a database to build a system to register people in an event.

Super-Powered REST API Testing – James Messinger, Postman

In this workshop, I’ll show you just how easy – and dare I say, fun – it can be to test REST APIs. Whether you prefer the command line, a text editor, or a GUI, there are tools that will fit nicely into your workflow. Plus, you’ll leave with sample code and a working demo to get you started.

See the full APIStrat schedule here and register now!

The newly announced schedule for the API Strategy & Practice Conference (APIStrat) — taking place Oct. 31 to Nov. 2 in Portland, Oregon — includes keynotes, workshops, technical talks, and more focused on the API economy. Jointly hosted by the Open API Initiative and The Linux Foundation, this conference brings together developers, IT teams, business users, and executives to discuss opportunities and challenges in the API space.

The conference program includes the following keynote speakers:

  • Yina Arenas – Microsoft

  • Glenn Block – Auth0

  • Adam Duvander – Zapier

  • Sarah Novotny – Google

APIStrat aims to spark conversations between API providers and API consumers, startups and enterprise, developers, architects, and integrators. The conference session tracks and topics include:

  • Beyond REST

  • Civic

  • Design

  • Hypermedia

  • Machine Learning

  • Management

  • Microservices

  • Protocols

  • SDK & Clients

  • Security

  • Standards & Definitions

  • Success Stories

  • Testing

  • Transformation

  • Usability

View the full lineup of all APIStrat speakers and sessions.

Registration is discounted by $300 through August 31, and academic rates are also available. In addition, applications are being accepted for diversity and need-based scholarships.

Linux.com readers receive an additional $25 off their registration with discount code LINUXRD5. Register now!

Open Source Summit Europe is not far away! This year’s event — held Oct. 23-26 in Prague, Czech Republic — will feature a wide array of speakers, including open source community expert Jono Bacon, 11-year-old hacker Reuben Paul, and Linux creator Linus Torvalds.

At OS Summit Europe, you will have the opportunity to collaborate, share, learn, and connect with 2,000 technologists and community members, through keynote presentations, technical talks, and many other event activities.  

Confirmed keynote speakers for OS Summit Europe include:

  • Jono Bacon, Community/Developer Strategy Consultant and Author

  • Keila Banks, 15-year-old Programmer, Web Designer and Technologist, with her father Phillip Banks

  • Mitchell Hashimoto, Founder of HashiCorp and Creator of Vagrant, Packer, Serf, Consul, Terraform, Vault, and Nomad

  • Neha Narkhede, Co-founder & CTO, Confluent

  • Sarah Novotny, Program Manager, Kubernetes Community, Google

  • Reuben Paul, 11-year-old Hacker, CyberShaolin Founder and Cyber Security Ambassador

  • Imad Sousou, VP, Software Services Group & GM, Open Source Technology Center, Intel Corporation

  • Linus Torvalds, Creator of Linux and Git in conversation with Dirk Hohndel, VP, Chief Open Source Officer, VMware

  • Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation

The full schedule will be published in the next few weeks, and applications are now being accepted for diversity and needs-based scholarships.

Registration is discounted to $800 through August 27, and academic and hobbyist rates are also available. Linux.com readers receive an additional $40 off with code LINUXRD5. Register Now!

This week in Linux and open source headlines, ONAP leads the way in the automation trend, Mozilla launches new, open source speech recognition project, and more! Get up to speed with the handy Linux.com weekly digest!

1) With automation being one of the top virtualization trends of 2017, The Linux Foundation’s ONAP is credited with moving the industry forward

Top Five Virtualization Trends of 2017– RCRWireless

2) Mozilla has launched a new open source project speech recognition system that relies on online volunteers to submit voice samples and validate them.

Common Voice: Mozilla Is Creating An Open Source Speech Recognition System– Fossbytes

3)In addition to membership growth, EdgeX Foundry has launched a series of technical training sessions to help developers get up to speed on the project.

Linux’s EdgeX IoT Group Adds Members, Forms Governing Team– SDxCentral

4) Multicore Association announces availability of an enhanced implementation of its Multicore Task Management API (MTAPI.)

Open Source Tools Set to Help Parallel Programming of Multicores– ElectronicsWeekly.com

5) “OCI 1.0 will ensure consistency at the lowest levels of infrastructure, and push the container wars battlefront up the stack.”

OCI 1.0 Container Image Spec Finds Common Ground Among Open Source Foes– TechTarget