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ONAP

“Bell has been engaged in the ONAP journey from day one and committed to get it to production to demonstrate its value,” said Tamer Shenouda, Director of Network Transformation for Bell.

Bell, Canada’s largest communications company, is the first in the world to deploy the open source version of the Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) in production. Bell has built the capability to automate its data center tenant network provisioning on top of the ONAP Platform, providing its operations teams with a new tool to improve efficiency and time to market. This is the first step in using ONAP as a common platform across Bell’s networks on its journey towards a multi-partner DevOps model.

As part of the company’s Network 3.0 transformation initiative, Bell and its partners used Agile delivery to launch a minimum viable product with the platform and will continue to adapt it to ensure that it best supports the needs of Bell customers. This significant development sends a clear message to the industry that ONAP is ready and usable, and that carriers don’t need to implement all ONAP components from day one to start production. Bell has also leveraged the capabilities of ONAP Operations Manager to simplify deployments, drastically reduce footprint and enable continuous delivery.

“Bell has been engaged in the ONAP journey from day one and committed to get it to production to demonstrate its value,” said Tamer Shenouda, Director of Network Transformation for Bell. “This demonstration will encourage other partners to take a similar incremental approach in delivery and operations of the platform, and we look forward to other telecoms launching ONAP to production.”

ONAP is a Linux Foundation project that unites two major open networking and orchestration projects – Open Source ECOMP and the Open Orchestrator Project (OPEN-O). ONAP brings together top global carriers and vendors, using shared knowledge to build a unified architecture that allows any network operator to automate, design, orchestrate and manage services and virtual functions.

“We’re very proud to be the first member of the ONAP Project to demonstrate the viability of the platform live on our network,” said Petri Lyytikainen, Bell’s Vice President, Network Strategy, Services and Management. “The evolution of our advanced software-defined networks will enable us to respond even faster to the unique needs of our customers.” 

Bell is a founding Platinum Member of ONAP. Platinum members include: Amdocs, AT&T, China Mobile, China Telecom, Cisco, Cloudify, Ericsson, Huawei, IBM, Intel, Jio, Nokia, Orange, Tech Mahindra, Türk Telekom, Vmware, Vodafone, and ZTE.

Mauro Carvalho Chehab answers a few questions about his work on the Linux kernel.

According to the recent Linux Kernel Development Report, the Linux operating system runs 90 percent of the public cloud workload, has 62 percent of the embedded market share, and 100 percent of the TOP500 supercomputers. It also runs 82 percent of the world’s smartphones and nine of the top ten public clouds. However, the sustained growth of this open source ecosystem would not be possible without the steady development of the Linux kernel.

In this series, we are highlighting the ongoing work of some Linux kernel contributors. Here, Mauro Carvalho Chehab, Open Source Director at Samsung Research Brazil, answers a few questions about his work on the kernel.

Linux Foundation: What role do you play in the community and what subsystem(s) do you work on?

I’m responsible for the Open Source efforts at Samsung Research Brazil, as part of Samsung’s Open Source Group. I maintain the media and EDAC (Error Detection and Correction) kernel subsystems.

Linux Foundation: What have you been working on this year?

This year, I did a lot of patches that improves Linux documentation. A lot of them were related to the conversion from the XML-based DocBook docs to a markup language (Restructured Text). Thanks to that, no documents use the legacy document system anymore. I also finally closed the documentation gap at the DVB API, with was out of sync for more than 10 years! I also did several bug fixes at the media subsystem, including the 4.9 breakage of many drivers that were doing DMA via stack.

Linux Foundation: What do you think the kernel community needs to work on in the upcoming year?

We should continue our work to support new device drivers and get rid of out of tree stuff. At the media subsystem, we should work to add support for newer TV standards, like ATSC version 3 and to improve support for embedded systems, on both DVB and V4L2 APIs.

Linux Foundation: Why do you contribute to the Linux kernel?

Because it is fun! Seriously, I strongly believe that the innovation process on computer engineering is currently driven by Linux. Working on its kernel has provided me the opportunity of working with great developers and helping to improve the top operating system.

You can learn more about the Linux kernel development process and read more developer profiles in the full report. Download the 2017 Linux Kernel Development Report now.

open source culture

Open source involves a culture of understanding change. It’s about evolution as a group, says Mesosphere’s CMO Peter Guagenti.

In the early days of open source, one of the primary goals of the open source community was educating people about the benefits of open source and why they should use it. Today, open source is ubiquitous. Almost everyone is using it. That has created a unique challenge around educating new users about the open source development model and ensuring that open source projects are sustainable.

Peter Guagenti, CMO at Mesosphere, Inc.

Peter Guagenti, the Chief Marketing Officer at Mesosphere, Inc., has comprehensive experience with how open source works, having been involved with several leading open source projects. He has been a coder, but says that he considers himself a hustler. We talked with him about his role at Mesosphere, how to help companies become good open source citizens, and about the role of culture in open source. Here is an edited version of that interview.

The Linux Foundation: What’s the role of a CMO in an open source software company?

Peter Guagenti: The role of a CMO in a software company is fundamentally different from that in any other category.  We have a really interesting role in marketing and technology, and it’s one of education and guidance. There used to be a place 20 years ago where, as a marketer, you would come up with a simple pithy message and buy a bunch of advertising and people would believe it.

That’s not true anymore. Now we have to position ourselves alongside the architectures and the thought leadership that our customers are interested in to prove our value.

The Linux Foundation: Can you explain more about this approach?

Guagenti: I love that instead of focusing on marketing taglines, you really have to know the technology so customers have the confidence that they will get the support we promise. Since this space is changing so quickly, we spend probably half our time simply on educating and informing about the market and the challenges that customers face.

I don’t think about talking about DCOS, for example; I think about how connected cars are really important but nobody really knows how to build them. We serve six of the largest car makers in the world. So getting them to talk about how they’re approaching this problem — what they think about Edge computing, what they think about computing in the car, or what they think about data and moving that data around. These are the real exciting things.

The Linux Foundation: Can you talk about other work you have done in open source?

Guagenti:  I’m a long-time open source advocate. I’ve been in open source for over 10 years. I built an open source services practice in a large digital agency called Razorfish when I was at a client services there. I’ve spent time at three open source companies: Acquia, which is in the Drupal open source project; Nginx, which is the world’s most popular web server and application delivery controller; and now I am at Mesosphere, the container company.

The Linux Foundation: Open source has become the de facto software development model — almost everyone is consuming open source these days. That creates a new challenge as many new consumers don’t fully understand how open source works, which can lead to problems like not being part of the ecosystem and creating technical debt. Have you come across this problem?

Guagenti: Open source has evolved dramatically over the past 20 years. I would argue 10 years ago you were crazy if you were a Fortune 500 company and you were the CIO and said I’m going to integrate open source everywhere. But now open source is the default. I’ve worked in large state and national governments around the world. I’ve worked in the Fortune 500, and they all have adopted open source. But how they adopt open source successfully is different. If you look company by company, if you look at projects, there is a difference.

There are community-driven models, there are corporate-driven models, and there are things in between where you see things like Kubernetes, where you’ve multiple companies contributing at scale. There is a great mix, but companies don’t always know how to make the best use of that. It becomes critical for them to find the right enterprise that helps them understand how to use and deploy it. More important than that is to help them ensure they are making good decisions with that software and driving the roadmap forward by contributing or at least by being a voice in that.

We take for granted that open source exists, but open source requires involvement—either contribution of code or cash—to keep those projects healthy. We are at a point where open source has been around long enough that we have seen early open source projects just die because they didn’t have core maintainers able to earn a salary.

I was told that every great technology company needs a hacker and a hustler. I was a good coder early on, but I wasn’t great. I’m more of a hustler. I loved being able to see businesses build around open source and then have have that really be the heart of a healthy ecosystem where everyone is able to benefit from that code.

The Linux Foundation: What role does culture play in open source adoption?

Guagenti: It matters. Look at the digital transformation that we have been going through for the last 20 years. Look at the companies that have done it best. You will notice that the old stalwarts have now reinvented themselves in a meaningful way. They are continuing to evolve with the time and are competing effectively. They had a culture where they could embrace and accept a lot of these things.  

If you look at hiring the great technology talent, what’s the number one thing great technology talent expects? They want to work with the tools they want to use. They want to do it in a way that fits their pattern of behavior, their pattern of building these things. It’s not the money, it’s not the stock options, it’s not the fancy work. It’s about the kind of work I want to do everyday and and the way I want to do it.  

I work with some of the largest banks, I work with some of the largest government entities. What I have noticed, with some of the most successful ones, is that they have a culture internally where they understand this stuff. They understand what it means to not just use open source but to be a part of an open source community. Sometimes you do run into hurdles. I work with a lot of large companies that are either not comfortable contributing code back or just simply don’t feel they have the time to do it. But they do their bit in a different way; they may do things like contribute  financially to projects, send people to to events, or actually go and tell their story.

That’s what we do a lot at Mesosphere. Since this space is changing, we love having our largest customers talking about what they’re doing with open source. Their culture matters because it’s not just the culture of open source and using open source. It’s a culture of innovation. It’s a culture of understanding change.  And that’s what open source is all about. It’s about evolution as a group.

Learn more about best practices for sustainable open source in the free Open Source Guides for the Enterprise from The Linux Foundation.

Autodesk is undergoing a company-wide shift to open source and inner source. And that’s on top of the culture change that both development methods require.

Autodesk is undergoing a company-wide shift to open source and inner source. And that’s on top of the culture change that both development methods require.

Inner source means applying open source development practices and methodologies to internal projects, even if the projects are proprietary. And the culture change required to be successful can be a hard shift from a traditional corporate hierarchy to an open approach. Even though they’re connected, all three changes are distinct heavy lifts.

They began by hiring Guy Martin as Director of Open Source Strategy in the Engineering Practice at Autodesk, which was designed to transform engineering across the company. Naturally, open source would play a huge role in that effort, including spurring the use of inner source. But neither would flourish if the company culture didn’t change. And so the job title swiftly evolved to Director of Open @ADSK at the company.

“I tend to focus a lot more on the culture change and the inner source part of my role even though I’m working through a huge compliance initiative right now on the open source side,” Martin said.

The history of Autodesk’s open source transformation began shortly after the shift of all its products to cloud began, including its AutoCAD architecture software, building information modeling with its Revit products, as well as  its media and entertainment products. The company’s role in open source in entertainment is now so significant that Martin often speaks at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences on open source. They want to hear about what  Autodesk is doing as part of a larger collection of initiatives that the Academy is working on, Martin said.

At Autodesk, the goal is to spring engineers loose from their business silos and create a fully open source, cloud-centric company.

“Your primary identity detaches from being part of the AutoCAD team or part of the Revit team, or the 3ds Max or Inventor team or any of these products,” Martin explained. “It’s now shaping you into part of the Autodesk engineering team, and not your individual silo as a product organization in the company.”

Talent acquisition is among the top business goals for Open@Autodesk, especially given the company’s intense focus on innovation as well as making all of its products work seamlessly together. It takes talent skilled in open source methodologies and thinking to help make that happen. But it also means setting up the team dynamics so collaboration is more natural and less forced.

“With company cultures and some engineering cultures, the freedom to take an unconventional route to solve a problem doesn’t exist,” Martin said. “A lot of my job is to create that freedom so that smart and motivated engineers can figure out a way to put things together in a way that maybe they wouldn’t have thought of without that freedom and that culture.”

To help create an open source culture, the right tools must be in place and, oddly enough, those tools sometimes aren’t open source. For example, Martin created a single instance of Slack rather than use IRC, because Slack was more comfortable for users in other lines of the business who were already using it. The intent was to get teams to start talking across their organizational boundaries.

Another tool Martin is working with is Bitergia Analytics to monitor and manage Autodesk’s use of GitHub Enterprise.

Martin says the three key lessons he’s learned as an open source program manager are:

  1. Stay flexible because change happens
  2. Be humble but bold
  3. Be passionate.

“I’ve been at Autodesk two years but I’m still bootstrapping some of the things around culture. We have strong contributors in some projects, while in some projects we’re consuming. I think you have to do both, especially if you’re bootstrapping a new open source effort in a company. ”

“The challenge is always balancing the needs of the product teams, who have to get a product out the door, and who (and as an engineer I can say this) will take shortcuts whenever possible. They want to know, ‘why should we be doing this for the community? All we care about is our stuff.’ And it’s getting them past that. Yes, we’re doing work that’s going to be used elsewhere, but in the end we’re going to get benefits from pulling work from other people who have done work that they knew was going to be used in the community.”

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OS Summit keynotes

Watch keynotes and technical sessions from OS Summit and ELC Europe here.

If you weren’t able to attend Open Source Summit and Embedded Linux Conference (ELC) Europe last week, don’t worry! We’ve recorded keynote presentations from both events and all the technical sessions from ELC Europe to share with you here.

Check out the on-stage conversation with Linus Torvalds and VMware’s Dirk Hohndel, opening remarks from The Linux Foundation’s Executive Director Jim Zemlin, and a special presentation from 11-year-old CyberShaolin founder Reuben Paul. You can watch these and other ELC and OS Summit keynotes below for insight into open source collaboration, community and technical expertise on containers, cloud computing, embedded Linux, Linux kernel, networking, and much more.

And, you can watch all 55+ technical sessions from Embedded Linux Conference here.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video link=”http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NLQZzEvavGs&list=PLbzoR-pLrL6pISWAq-1cXP4_UZAyRtesk&index=1″][/vc_column][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” width=”1/2″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_video 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This week in open source news, AGL reveals new infotainment platform, mainstream enterprises derive the most benefit from OSS, and more! Read on to stay on top of the latest open source news. 

1) Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) recently revealed the latest infotainment platform along with a new Virtualization Expert Group (EG-VIRT) to develop a virtualized architecture.

Linux Foundation Focuses on Bringing Virtualization to Your Car– RCRWireless News

2) “Combing through the last few quarters of earnings transcripts, it’s clear that open source has arrived…but to very different destinations, depending on the company.”

Open Source is Driving Digital Transformation, According to Mainstream Businesses– Tech Republic

3) Amazon Web Services joined the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF), (open source home of the Kubernetes project,) as a Platinum Member.

AWS joins the Cloud Native Computing Foundation– TechCrunch

4) “On August 24 and 25, the Ubuntu Desktop team will be holding a “Fit and Finish Sprint,” where they will aggressively test GNOME.”

Canonical Needs Your Help Transitioning Ubuntu Linux From Unity to GNOME– BetaNews

5) The VoltaStream Zero (an open source integrated audio module in the same form as a Raspberry Pi Zero) has launched.

Raspberry Pi Zero Clone: This Open Source Board Offers Chromecast-Quality Sound– ZDNet

This week in OSS and Linux news, two opinion writers at The New York Times consider the safeguards of open source software in future elections, Prodip Sen of HP shares the growing role of OPNFV, and more! Read on to stay in the open source know this week. 

1) The National Association of Voting Officials is leading a movement to encourage officials to stop purchasing insecure systems and use open source software to “guard our votes against manipulation.”

To Protect Voting, Use Open-Source Software– New York Times

2) As NFV becomes more central in transitioning to 5G, so too does OPNFV.

OPNFV’s Role in NFV Testing and the Road to 5G– Telecom TV

3) Microsoft continues trend towards being more open with new CNCF Platinum membership.

Microsoft Expands Role In Cloud By Joining Cloud Native Computing Foundation– Forbes

4) Windows 10 users will be able to run an array of Linux software this Fall.

Windows 10 Will Let Everyone Run Linux Inside Windows Following Fall Creators Update– TechRepublic

5) The effort to save Adobe Flash continues.

GitHub Developer Starts Petition to Open Source Adobe Flash– Computer Business Review

Open Source Summit Europe is not far away! This year’s event — held Oct. 23-26 in Prague, Czech Republic — will feature a wide array of speakers, including open source community expert Jono Bacon, 11-year-old hacker Reuben Paul, and Linux creator Linus Torvalds.

At OS Summit Europe, you will have the opportunity to collaborate, share, learn, and connect with 2,000 technologists and community members, through keynote presentations, technical talks, and many other event activities.  

Confirmed keynote speakers for OS Summit Europe include:

  • Jono Bacon, Community/Developer Strategy Consultant and Author

  • Keila Banks, 15-year-old Programmer, Web Designer and Technologist, with her father Phillip Banks

  • Mitchell Hashimoto, Founder of HashiCorp and Creator of Vagrant, Packer, Serf, Consul, Terraform, Vault, and Nomad

  • Neha Narkhede, Co-founder & CTO, Confluent

  • Sarah Novotny, Program Manager, Kubernetes Community, Google

  • Reuben Paul, 11-year-old Hacker, CyberShaolin Founder and Cyber Security Ambassador

  • Imad Sousou, VP, Software Services Group & GM, Open Source Technology Center, Intel Corporation

  • Linus Torvalds, Creator of Linux and Git in conversation with Dirk Hohndel, VP, Chief Open Source Officer, VMware

  • Jim Zemlin, Executive Director, The Linux Foundation

The full schedule will be published in the next few weeks, and applications are now being accepted for diversity and needs-based scholarships.

Registration is discounted to $800 through August 27, and academic and hobbyist rates are also available. Linux.com readers receive an additional $40 off with code LINUXRD5. Register Now!

This week in Linux and open source, Microsoft’s new CNCF membership represents the company’s ongoing love for open source, Adobe Flash is the subject of enthusiast rescue mission, and much more

1) Microsoft continues its Linux lovefest with new CNCF membership.

Microsoft Further Pledges Linux Loyalty by Joining Cloud Native Computing Foundation– Beta News

2) While Adobe is “mercy killing” Flash, enthusiasts are hoping for an open source lifeboat.

Adobe Flash Fans Want a Chance to Fix Its One Million Bugs Under an Open Source License– Gizmodo

3) A project intended to “develop open source technology and standards for “computational contracting” for the legal world that deploys blockchain technology” is getting ready for liftoff

Accord Project’s Consortium Launching First Legal ‘Smart Contracts’ With Hyperledger– Forbes

4) Version 60 of Google Chrome has been released for Linux and features security fixes, developer-related changes, and more

Google Chrome 60 Released for Linux, Mac, and Windows– Bleeping Computer

5) SambaCry doesn’t just favor Linux…

Creators Of SambaCry Linux Malware Also Have A Windows Backdoor Program– Forbes

Linux is hot right now. Everybody is looking for Linux talent. Recruiters are knocking down the doors of anybody with Linux experience, and there are tens of thousands of jobs waiting to be filled. But what if you want to take advantage of this trend and you’re new to Linux? How do you get started?

  1. Install Linux  

    It should almost go without saying, but the first key to learning Linux is to install Linux. Both the LFS101x and the LFS201 courses include detailed sections on installing and configuring Linux for the first time.

  2. Take LFS101x

    If you are completely new to Linux, the best place to start is our free LFS101x Introduction to Linux course. This online course is hosted by edX.org, and explores the various tools and techniques commonly used by Linux system administrators and end users to achieve their day-to-day work in a Linux environment. It is designed for experienced computer users who have limited or no previous exposure to Linux, whether they are working in an individual or enterprise environment. This course will give you a good working knowledge of Linux from both a graphical and command line perspective, allowing you to easily navigate through any of the major Linux distributions.

  3. Look into LFS201

    Once you’ve completed LFS101x, you’re ready to start diving into the more complicated tasks in Linux that will be required of you as a professional sysadmin. To gain those skills, you’ll want to take LFS201 Essentials of Linux System Administration. The course gives you in-depth explanations and instructions for each topic, along with plenty of exercises and labs to help you get real, hands-on experience with the subject matter.

    If you would rather have a live instructor teach you or you have an employer who is interested in helping you become a Linux sysadmin, you might also be interested in LFS220 Linux System Administration. This course includes all the same topics as the LFS201 course, but is taught by an expert instructor who can guide you through the labs and answer any questions you have on the topics covered in the course.

  4. Practice!

    Practice makes perfect, and that’s as true for Linux as it is for any musical instrument or sport. Once you’ve installed Linux, use it regularly. Perform key tasks over and over again until you can do them easily without reference material. Learn the ins and outs of the command line as well as the GUI. This practice will ensure that you’ve got the skills and knowledge to be successful as a professional Linux sysadmin.

  5. Get Certified

    After you’ve taken LFS201 or LFS220 and you’ve gotten some practice, you are now ready to get certified as a system administrator. You’ll need this certification because this is how you will prove to employers that you have the necessary skills to be a professional Linux sysadmin.

    There are several Linux certifications on the market today, and all of them have their place. However, most of these certifications are either centered on a specific distro (like Red Hat) or are purely knowledge-based and don’t demonstrate actual skill with Linux. The Linux Foundation Certified System Administrator certification is an excellent alternative for someone looking for a flexible, meaningful entry-level certification.

  6. Get Involved

    At this point you may also want to consider joining up with a local Linux Users Group (or LUG), if there’s one in your area. These groups are usually composed of people of all ages and experience levels, so regardless of where you are at with your Linux experience, you can find people with similar skill levels to bond with, or more advanced Linux users who can help answer questions and point you towards helpful resources. To find out if there’s a LUG near you, try looking on meetup.com, check with a nearby university, or just do a simple Internet search.

    There are also many online communities available to you as you learn Linux. These sites and communities provide help and support to both individuals new to Linux or experienced administrators:

7. Learn To Love The Documentation

Last but not least, if you ever get stuck on something within Linux, don’t forget about Linux’s included documentation. Using the commands man (for manual), info and help, you can find information on virtually every aspect of Linux, right from within the operating system. The usefulness of these built-in resources cannot be overstated, and you’ll find yourself using them throughout your career, so you might as well get familiar with them early on.

Interested in learning more about a career in system administration? Check out our free ebook “Future Proof Your SysAdmin Career.