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Containers are becoming the de facto approach for deploying applications, because they are easy to use and cost-effective. With containers, you can significantly cut down the time to go to market if the entire team responsible for the application lifecycle is involved — whether they are developers, Quality Assurance engineers, or Ops engineers.

The new Containers for Developers and Quality Assurance (LFS254) self-paced course from The Linux Foundation is designed for developers and Quality Assurance engineers who are interested in learning the workflow of an application with Docker. In this self-paced course, we will quickly review some Docker basics, including installation, and then, with the help of a sample application, we will walk through the lifecycle of that application with Docker.

The online course is presented almost entirely on video and some of the topics covered in this course preview include:

  • Overview and Installation

  • Docker Machine

  • Docker Container and Image Operations

  • Dockerfiles and Docker Hub

  • Docker Volumes and Networking

  • Docker Compose

Access a free sample chapter

In the course, we focus on creating an end-to-end workflow for our application — from development to production. We’ll use Docker as our primary container environment and Jenkins as our primary CI/CD tool. All of the Docker hosts used in this course will be deployed on the cloud (DigitalOcean).

Install Docker

You’ll need to have Docker installed in order to work along with the course materials. All of Docker’s free products come under the Docker Community Edition. They’re offered in two variants: edge and stable. All of the enterprise and production-ready products come under the Docker Enterprise Edition umbrella.

And, you can download all the Docker products from the Docker Store. For this course, we will be using the Community edition. So, click on “GET DOCKER CE” to proceed further. If you select “Linux” in the “Operating Systems” section, you’ll see that Docker is available on all the major Linux distributions, like CentOS, Ubuntu, Fedora, and so on. It’s also available for Mac and Windows.

This preview series is intended to give you a sample of the course format and quality of the content, which is prepared and presented by Neependra Khare (@neependra), Founder and Principal Consultant at CloudYuga, Docker Captain, and author of the Docker Cookbook.

Watch the sample videos to learn more:  

Want to learn more? Access all the free sample chapter videos now!

This article series previews the new Containers Fundamentals training course from The Linux Foundation, which is designed for those who are new to container technologies. In previous excerpts, we talked about what containers are and what they’re not and explained a little of their history. In this last post of the series, we will look at the building blocks for containers, specifically, namespaces, control groups, and UnionFS.

Namespace is a feature of the Linux kernel, which isolates and virtualizes system resources for a process, so that each process gets its own resource, like its own IP address, hostname, etc. System resources that can be virtualized are: mount [mnt], process ID [PID], network [net], Interprocess Communication [IPC], hostnames [UTS], and users [User IDs].

Using the namespace feature of the Linux kernel, we can isolate one process from another. The container is nothing but a process for the kernel, so we isolate each container using different namespaces.

Another important feature that enables containerization is control groups. With control groups, we can limit, account, and isolate the resource users like CPU, memory, disk, network, etc.  And, with UnionFS, we can transparently overlay two or more directories and implement a layered approach for containers.

You can get more details in the sample course video below, presented by Neependra Khare (@neependra), Founder and Principal Consultant at CloudYuga, Docker Captain, and author of the Docker Cookbook.

Want to learn more? Access all the free sample chapter videos now!

On Thursday, June 1, The Linux Foundation will continue its series of Twitter chats entitled #AskLF featuring leaders at the organization. Previous chats were hosted by The Linux Foundation’s Arpit Joshipura, GM of Networking & Orchestration and Clyde Seepersad, Manager of Training and Certifications. June’s #AskLF host is CTO of Cloud Foundry Foundation, Chip Childers.

#AskLF, was created to broaden access to thought leaders, community organizers, and expertise within The Linux Foundation. While there are many opportunities to interact with staff at Linux Foundation global events, which bring together over 25,000 open source influencers, a live Twitter Q&A will give participants a direct line of communication to designated hosts.

Childers

Chip Childers

Chip Childers, Cloud Foundry CTO.

Chip Childers is an open source and large-scale computing veteran, having spent 18 years in the field. He co-founded Cloud Foundry Foundation as Technology Chief of Staff in 2015, coming from a VP of Product Strategy role at Cumulogic. Before that, he was the inaugural VP of Apache Cloudstack while leading Enterprise Cloud Services at SunGardChilders led the rebuild of pivotal applications for organizations such as IRS.gov, USMint.gov, and Merrill Lync. 

This “Cloud Foundry 101” #AskLF session will take place in advance of Cloud Foundry Summit Silicon Valley, where Childers will present a talk called A Platform for the Enterprise: Where Maturity & Innovation Intersect. @linuxfoundation followers are encouraged to ask Childers questions related to the Cloud Foundry platform and the foundation’s community

Sample questions might include:

  • What is the Cloud Foundry Foundation Developer Training and Certification Program and how do I get started?

  • Why do developers choose Cloud Foundry over other platforms and competitors?

  • How does The Cloud Foundry Foundation grow its community of contributors? How can I get involved? 

  • What will I get out of attending Cloud Foundry Summit?

Here’s how you can participate in the first #AskLF:

  • Follow @linuxfoundation on Twitter: Hosts will take over The Linux Foundation’s account during the session.

  • Save the date: June 1, 2017 at 10 a.m. PT.

  • Use the hashtag #AskLF: To ask Childers your questions while he hosts, simply tweet it with the hashtag #AskLF on 6/1 between 10 am & 10:45 am PDT. We can’t guarantee that he will have time to answer every inquiry, but every attempt will be made!

  • Consider attending Open Networking Summit in Santa Clara next month: This #AskLF session will prepare you to engage in the topics at Cloud Foundry Summit and you’ll get a chance to hear Childers speak live. Click here for registration and schedule details.

More dates and details for future #AskLF sessions to come! We’ll see you on Twitter, June 1 at 10 a.m. PT.

Read blogs by Chip Childers here: 

https://www.cloudfoundry.org/author/cchilders/​

*Note: Unlike Reddit-style AMAs, #AskLF is not focused around general topics that might pertain to the host’s personal life. To participate, please focus your questions around open source networking and Chip Childers’s career.

This series provides a preview of the new, self-paced Containers Fundamentals course from The Linux Foundation, which is designed for those who are new to container technologies. The course covers container building blocks, container runtimes, container storage and networking, Dockerfiles, Docker APIs, and more. In the first excerpt, we defined what containers are, and in this installment, we’ll explain a bit further. You can also sign up to access all the free sample chapter videos now.

Note that containers are not lightweight VMs. Both of these tools provide isolation and run applications, but the underlying technologies are completely different. The process of managing them is also different.

VMs are created on top of a hypervisor, which is installed on the host operating system. Containers directly run on the host operating system, without any guest OS of its own. The host operating system provides isolation and does resource allocation to individual containers.

Once you become familiar with containers and would like to deploy them on production, you might ask “Where should I deploy my containers — on VMs, bare metal, in the cloud?”  From the container’s perspective, it does not matter as it can run anywhere. But in reality, many variables affect the decision, such as cost, performance, security, current skill set, and so on.

Find out more in these sample course videos below, taught by Neependra Khare (@neependra), Founder and Principal Consultant at CloudYuga, former Red Hat engineer, Docker Captain, and author of the Docker Cookbook:

Want to learn more? Access all the free sample chapter videos now!

This week in Linux and OSS news, Edward Snowden explains why he thinks proprietary software is very risky, SNAS.io Project joins The Linux Foundation, & more! Read on to stay in the open source know!

1) The infamous United States NSA hacker, Edward Snowden, was interviewed via remote video at OpenStack Summit Boston. He spoke on his personal use of technology and why that doesn’t include proprietary software.

Why Edward Snowden Loves Open Source– NetworkWorld

2) A new Linux Foundation project provides network routing topologies for software-defined applications.

Snas.io Joins The Linux Foundation’s Open-Source Project– FierceTelecom

3) Google’s “mysterious” third OS is based on a Google-developed microkernel called “Magenta”– not Linux.

Google’s “Fuchsia” Smartphone OS Dumps Linux, Has a Wild New UI– Ars Technica

4) A new software project under Hyperledger is “aimed at creating a collaboration tool for building blockchain business networks — or smart contracts — and their deployment across a distributed ledger.”

Linux Foundation to Develop Tool for Building Blockchain Business Networks– ComputerWorld

5) Speakers at NFV World Congress explain that open source is crucial to their NFV plans.

Telcos Digging In on Open Source NFV– Light Reading

In this series, we’ll provide a preview of the new Containers Fundamentals (LFS253) course from The Linux Foundation. The course is designed for those who are new to container technologies, and it covers container building blocks, container runtimes, container storage and networking, Dockerfiles, Docker APIs, and more. In this installment, we start from the basics. You can also sign up to access all the free sample chapter videos now.

What Are Containers?

In today’s world, developers, quality assurance engineers, and everyone involved in the application lifecycle are listening to customer feedback and striving to implement the requested features as soon as possible.

Containers are an application-centric way to deliver high-performing, scalable applications on the infrastructure of your choice by bundling the application code, the application runtime, and the libraries.

Additionally, using containers with microservices makes a lot of sense, because you can do rapid development and deployment with confidence. With containers, you can also record a deployment by building an immutable infrastructure. If something goes wrong with the new changes, you can simply return to the previously known working state.

This self-paced course — taught by Neependra Khare (@neependra), Founder and Principal Consultant at CloudYuga, former Red Hat engineer, Docker Captain, and author of the Docker Cookbook — is provided almost entirely in video format. This video from chapter 1 gives an overview of containers.

Want to learn more? Access all the free sample chapter videos now!

At the recent Open Networking Summit, the SDN/NFV community convened in Santa Clara to share, learn, collaborate, and network about one of the most pervasive industry transformations of our time.

This year’s theme at ONS was “Harmonize, Harness, and Consume,” representing a significant turning point as network operators spanning telecommunications, cable, enterprise, cloud, and the research community renew their efforts to redefine the network architecture.

Widespread new technology adoption takes years to succeed, and requires close collaboration among those producing network technology and those consuming it. Traditionally, standards development organizations (SDOs) have played a critical role in offering a forum for discussion and debate, and well-established processes for systematically standardizing and verifying new technologies.

Introduction of largely software (vs. hardware) functionality necessitates a rethinking of the conventional technology adoption lifecycle. In a software driven world, it is infeasible to define a priori complex reference architectures and software platforms without a more iterative approach. As a result, industry has been increasingly turning to open source communities for implementation expertise and feedback.

In this new world order, closer collaboration among the SDOs, industry groups, and open source projects is needed to capitalize upon each constituent’s strengths:

  • SDOs provide operational expertise and well-defined processes for technology definition, standardization, and validation
  • Industry groups offer innovative partnerships between network operators and their vendors to establish open reference architectures that are guiding the future of the industry
  • Open source projects provide technology development expertise and infrastructure that are guided by end-user use cases, priorities, and requirements

Traditionally each of these groups operates relatively autonomously, liaising formally and informally primarily for knowledge sharing.

Moving ahead, close coordination is essential to better align individual organizations objectives, priorities, and plans. SDN/NFV are far too pervasive for any single group to own or drive. As a result, the goal is to capitalize upon the unique strengths of each to accelerate technology adoption.

It is in the spirit of such harmonization that The Linux Foundation is pleased to unveil an industry-wide call to action to achieve this goal.

As a first step, we are issuing a white paper, “Harmonizing Open Source and Standards in the Telecom World,” to outline the key concepts, and invite an unprecedented collaboration among the SDOs, open source projects, and industry groups that each play a vital role in the establishment of a sustainable ecosystem which is essential for success.

The introduction of The Linux Foundation Open Network Automation Platform (ONAP) is a tangible step in the direction of harmonization, not only merging OPEN-O and the open source ECOMP communities, but also establishing a platform that by its nature as an orchestration and automation platform, must inherently integrate with a diverse set of standards, open source projects, and reference architectures.

We invite all in the community to participate in the process, in a neutral environment, where the incentives for all are to work together vs. pursue their own paths.

Join us to usher in a new era of collaboration and convergence to reshape the future.

Download the Whitepaper

On Friday, April 28, The Linux Foundation will continue its new series of Twitter chats with leaders at the organization. This monthly activity, entitled #AskLF, gives the open source community a chance to ask upper management at questions about The Linux Foundation’s strategies and offerings.

#AskLF aims to increase access to the bright minds and community organizers within The Linux Foundation. While there are many opportunities to interact with staff at Linux Foundation global events, which bring together over 25,000 open source influencers, a live Twitter Q&A will give participants a direct line of communication to the designated hosts.

The second host (following Arpit Joshipura’s chat last month) will be Clyde Seepersad, the General Manager of Training and Certification since 2013. His #AskLF session will take place in the midst of many new training initiatives at the organization, including a new Inclusive Speaker Orientation and a Kubernetes Fundamentals course. @linuxfoundation followers are encouraged to ask Seepersad questions related to Linux Foundation courses, certifications, job prospects in the open source industry, and recent training developments.

Sample questions might include:

  • I’m new to open source but I want to work in the industry. How can a Linux Foundation Certification help me?

  • What are The Linux Foundation Training team’s support offerings like?

  • How will a Linux Foundation certification give me an advantage over other candidates with competitors’ certifications?

Here’s how you can participate in the first #AskLF:

  • Follow @linuxfoundation on Twitter: Hosts will take over The Linux Foundation’s account during the session.

  • Save the date: April 28, 2017 at 10 a.m. PT.

  • Use the hashtag #AskLF: To ask Clyde your questions while he hosts. Click here to spread the news of #AskLF with your Twitter community.

  • Be a n00b!: If you’ve been considering beginning a open source training journey, don’t be afraid to ask Clyde basic questions about The Linux Foundation’s methods, recommendations, or subjects covered. No inquiry is too basic!

More dates and details for future #AskLF sessions to come! We’ll see you on Twitter, April 28th at 10 a.m. PT.

More information on Linux Foundation Training can be found in the training blog via Linux.com:

https://www.linux.com/learn/training

Hear Clyde’s thoughts on why Linux Foundation certifications give you a competitive advantage in this on-demand webinar:

No More Excuses: Why You Need to Get Certified Now

*note: unlike Reddit-style AMAs, #AskLF is not focused around general topics that might pertain to the host’s personal life. To participate, please focus your questions around open source networking and Clyde Seepersad’s career.

MesosCon is an annual conference held in three locations around the globe and organized by the Apache Mesos community in partnership with The Linux Foundation. The events bring together users and developers of the open source orchestration framework to share and learn about the project and its growing ecosystem.

The MesosCon program committee is now seeking proposals for MesosCon North America and MesosCon Europe from speakers with fresh ideas, enlightening case studies, best practices, or deep technical knowledge.

All MesosCon events this year will be held directly following Open Source Summit in China, North America, and Europe. Event dates and locations are as follows:

MesosCon Asia June 21 – 22, 2017 in Beijing, China

MesosCon North America September 14 – 15, 2017 in Los Angeles, California, USA

MesosCon Europe October 26 – 27, 2017 in Prague, Czech Republic

Last year, experts from Uber, Twitter, PayPal, and Hubspot, among many others shared how they use Apache Mesos at MesosCon North America.

Best practices, lessons learned, and case studies are again among the topics the program committee is seeking for 2017. Some sample proposal topics include:  

  • Best practices and lessons on deploying and running Mesos at scale

  • Deep dives and tutorials into Mesos

  • Interesting extensions to Mesos (e.g., new communication models, support for new containerizers, new resource types and allocation models, etc.)

  • Improvements/additions to the Mesos ecosystem (packaging systems, monitoring, log aggregation, load balancing, service discovery)

  • New frameworks

  • Microservices design

  • Continuous Delivery / DevOps (automating into production)

Submit a proposal to speak at MesosCon North America » The deadline is May 20.

Submit a proposal to speak at MesosCon Europe » The deadline is July 8.

The deadline has passed for submitting proposals for MesosCon Asia.

Not interested in speaking but want to attend? Linux.com readers receive 5% off the “attendee” registration with code LINUXRD5.

Register for MesosCon Asia » Save $125 through April 30.

Register for MesosCon North America » Save $200 through July 2.

Register for MesosCon Europe » Save $200 through August 27.

Apache, Apache Mesos, and Mesos are either registered trademarks or trademarks of the Apache Software Foundation (ASF) in the United States and/or other countries. MesosCon is run in partnership with the ASF.

Four events, one name: LinuxCon, ContainerCon, CloudOpen and the all-new Community Leadership Conference have combined to form one big event: Open Source Summit North America. The rebranded event, to be held Sept. 11-13 in Los Angeles, will feature a broader range of open source topics, and be more inclusive than ever.

Each of the four conference areas bring a different part of the open source community to the table, providing a holistic overview of the industry for attendees of the new Open Source Summit.

That also means The Linux Foundation is seeking talks on a wide range of subjects from DevOps and Containers, to Security and Networking, to Linux and Kernel Development. Proposals are due May 6 — submit your talk now!

Suggested topics include:

  • DevOps (Continuous Delivery, Continuous Integration, Lean IT, Moving at Cloud-speed)

  • Networking (Software Defined Networking, NFV, OpenFlow, Overlays, Networks as Code)

  • Security (Coding, Configuration, Testing, Malware)

  • Cloud & Microservices (Containers – Libraries, Runtimes, Composition; Hypervisors; Workload Orchestration – Mesos, Kubernetes; Distributed Services)

  • Hardware (Architectures, Maker Culture, Small Devices)

  • Linux Kernel Development

  • Virtualization

  • Professional Open Source (e.g. Compliance, Licensing, Services, Upstreaming)

  • Embedded Systems (Phones and Tablets, Automotive and Self-driving, Yocto, Wearables)

  • Mission-Critical, Real-Time Operating Systems, Real-Time, and Long Life Systems

  • Internet of Everything (Smart Grid, Smart Home, Medical Systems, Environmental Systems)

  • Filesystems And Storage (Long-Term Archiving, Client-Server Filesystems, Compression, Deduplication, Distributed Storage, NVMe, etc.)

  • Culture (Collaborative Development, Community, Advocacy, Government, Governance)

  • Linux On The Desktop (Porting Proprietary Software, Hardware With Linux Pre-installed, Wine and Emulators, Influencing Closed-Source Companies)

 

Got a great idea, case study, or technical tutorial you’d like to share? Learn more about the CFP process and submit your speaking proposal before the CFP closes on May 6.

Submit Your Talk

Not interested in speaking but want to attend? Register now to save over $300! Linux.com readers can save an additional $40 off the Attendee All-Access Registration with code LINUXRD5.