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This new ebook from The Linux Foundation provides a practical approach to establishing an open source strategy based on more than two decades of experience.

When it comes to running and managing open source in the enterprise, experience-driven advice counts for a lot. It is very likely that your organization already runs open source, but many organizations make the mistake of reacting to the open source ecosystem instead of adopting a proactive strategy that is optimized for success. That’s where the free Enterprise Open Source ebook comes in.

This new 45-page ebook from The Linux Foundation provides a practical approach to establishing an open source strategy by outlining the actions your enterprise can take to accelerate its open source efforts. The information is based on more than two decades of professional, enterprise open source usage and development and will be most beneficial to software engineering executives, development managers, compliance experts, and senior engineers involved in enterprise open source activities.

“The availability of enterprise grade open source software is changing the way organizations develop and deliver products,” the book notes. “The combination of a transparent development community and access to public source code enables organizations to think differently about how they procure, implement, test, deploy, and maintain software. This has the potential to offer a wealth of benefits, including reduced development costs, faster product development, higher code quality standards, and more.”

Proven Practices

The book outlines concrete steps that an organization can take to run an effective open source program and foster success with open source. These include the following recommendations:

  • Join The Linux Foundation compliance Initiatives
  • Establish relationships with open source communities
  • Create or outsource open source training
  • Collaborate with universities on open source R&D projects
  • Join the TODO Group (Talk Openly, Develop Openly)
  • Encourage internal collaboration

The ebook also makes specific recommendations for important open source workflow practices in enterprises. You’ll find discussions on:

  • Visibility
  • Forking
  • Pull/Merge Requests
  • Peer Review
  • Release Early, Release Often
  • Testing
  • Continuous Integration
  • Documentation
  • Issue Tracking

This book states that strategizing and communicating are important steps in managing enterprise open source effectively: “To establish open source software as a major driving force for software development, your company needs to develop business-level objectives and fully identify any constraints faced for the use of open source software. The goal is to establish consensus and communicate business rationale behind new policies. This book will help you develop a strategy that transforms your efforts from a defensive approach that reacts to open source software to offensive market leadership that is fueled by strong open source engineering.”

Lessons Learned

The “Lessons Learned from Two Decades of Enterprise Open Source Experience” section notes that one of the most important steps an enterprise can take is to encourage a cultural shift surrounding open source.

“You’ll need to lead a cultural shift from traditional software development practices to a more open and collaborative mindset. Internal company dynamics need to be favorable to open source efforts. As an open source leader inside your organization, you will face challenges in terms of funding resources, justifying ROI, getting upstream focus, and so forth. These challenges often require a major shift in mindset and a lot of education up the chain.”

Download your free copy of Enterprise Open Source: A Practical Introduction now.

Michelle Noorali

Michelle Noorali, Senior Software Engineer at Microsoft, says meeting people at open source events helps her better understand how they are using cloud-native tools.

Open source events create the best interaction points between developers and users, and one person you’re likely to meet at these events is Michelle Noorali, one of the most visible and recognizable faces in one of the biggest open source communities: Kubernetes.

Most modern software development, which is by default open source, is done by people spread across the globe, many of whom have never met in person. That’s why events like Open Source Summit are extremely important in creating opportunities for interaction for the people who are managing, developing, and using these open source projects.

Noorali, Senior Software Engineer at Microsoft, says she loves meeting people at events and learning about how they are using cloud-native tools and what they need. “I am trying to see if those tools that I work on can also meet other people’s needs,” she said.

This direct interaction gives Noorali a unique perspective for understanding the pain points. For example, “It’s really hard to pick from all of the cloud native technologies and figure out how they work together because at the end of the day, you are trying to deploy and run applications in the cloud or on bare metal,” she said. “The second point is how do I expose my developers, my teams to this stuff and get them to actually use cloud native tools, without having to learn about everything from scratch.”

Knowledge and support

Open Source is about day one, you get the technology that’s being created by a massive community, but you need support for day two, when you are actually using and managing it. That’s where companies like Microsoft, Red Hat, SUSE, Google, and Mirantis come into the picture, helping users consume these technologies.

Beyond support, there is a huge need for knowledgebase to help users understand these technologies. “In the case of Kubernetes, you have to learn what a pod is; what is deployment, what’s a replica set. Before you even get to that, you have to learn about containers — how to build images and where to store images,” she said. “I am working on making this whole situation a lot easier for developers to understand and use.”

At events like Open Source Summit, Noorali also comes across unique use cases. “I got super excited about one user who is building platform as a service for robotics on Kubernetes,” she said, “I am also excited about seeing specifically weird business use cases and how people pick and choose technologies and put them together in this space.”

These events not only bring users and developers together, they also bring together companies who cooperate on technologies while competing on products and services. You see companies like Google, Red Hat, SUSE, and Microsoft under the same roof, helping each other.

“You don’t want to work on a project by yourself; you need to work with other companies, and it’s nice to see them come together,” Noorali said. “I’ve had a good experience with the community, and I’ve been really involved for a while now.”

Learn more and connect with your peers at Open Source Summit, coming up this month in Vancouver.

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Open Networking Summit

Register for Open Networking Summit Europe by August 4 to save $805.

The schedule for Open Networking Summit Europe is now live!

Open Networking Summit, the premier open networking event in North America, comes to Europe for the first time this year, gathering enterprises, service providers, and cloud providers across the open networking ecosystem.

Join 1000+ architects, developers, and thought leaders in Amsterdam, September 25-27, to share learnings, highlight innovation and discuss the future of open networking, including SDN, NFV, orchestration, and the automation of cloud, network, and IoT services.

Keynote Sessions Include:

  • Talks from Deutsche Telekom, Orange, and Türk Telekom
  • Sessions and panels on the intersection of cloud native and networking; the intersection of blockchain and networking; ONAP leadership; and vendor innovation in open source.
  • Cross Domain/Cross-Layer VPN Service Orchestration Demo from China Mobile, Huawei, and Vodafone
  • Virtual Central Office (VCO) 2.0 – Virtualized Mobile Network Demo showing new and improved use cases extending the capabilities of the VCO, with presenters from China Mobile, Red Hat, and more.

Session Highlights Include:

  • Network Service Mesh: An Attempt to Reimagine NFV in a Cloud-Native Fashion – Frederick Kautz, Red Hat and Kyle Mestery, Cisco
  • Creating Synergies: Sharing and Reusing Results of CI/CD System Between Communities – Fatih Degirmenci, Ericsson and Yolanda Robla Mota, Red Hat
  • 5G Edge Cloud in a Lightpole – Tapio Tallgren, Nokia
  • ONAP Exploration at Verizon – Fernando Oliveira and Viswanath Kumar Skand Priya, Verizon
  • A Practical Approach to Intent-Based Networking: Dynamic On-demand QoS – Carlos Giraldo Rodríguez, Gradiant
  • Closed-Loop Automation for Edge Cloud with Distributed ONAP Multi-Cloud – Bin Yang, Wind River Systems
  • And many, many more including talks from Airbnb, Alibaba Cloud, General Motors, Intel, LinkedIn, Microsoft, Pivotal, Thomas Reuters and VMware.

ONS Europe offers 100+ sessions, labs, tutorials and lightning talks across networking trends, networking business and operations, service provider and cloud networking, and enterprise IT covering a range of open networking projects and technologies.

Content is offered for both the business & architecture audience, and the developer/DevOps audience. Rounding out the event are unconference sessions, evening events and developer lounges for face to face collaboration, and the opportunity to view dozens of demos from networking projects and companies.

Sign up to receive updates on Open Networking Summit:

REGISTER BY AUGUST 4 TO SAVE $805 »

Need help convincing your manager? Here’s a letter that can help you make the request to attend Open Networking Summit Europe.

Applications for diversity and needs-based scholarships are also being accepted. Get information on eligibility and how to apply. Free childcare is also available for attendees.

Open Source Summit

Open Source Summit is THE place to learn about latest open source trends and technologies. Register now!

Open Source Summit North America is right around the corner. There will be hundreds of sessions, workshops, and talks, all curated by experts in the Linux and open source communities. It’s not an easy feat to choose the topics and sessions you want to attend at the event  because there are so many topics and only so much time.

In this article, we talk with Laura Abbott, a developer employed by Red Hat, and Bryan Liles, a developer at Heptio, a Kubernetes company, based in Seattle, Washington, about the upcoming event. Abbott is on the program committee for Open Source Summit, and Liles is one of the program chairs, working hard “to build out a schedule that touches on many aspects of Open Source.”

Hot topics

“I’ve been interested in cloud-native applications for a few years now, and I spend most of my time thinking about the problems and developing software in this space,” said Liles. “I’m also interested in computer vision, augmented reality, and virtual reality. One of the most important topics in this space right now is Machine Learning. It’s amazing to see all the open source solutions being created. I feel that even as a hobbyist, I can find tools to help me build and run models without causing me to go into debt. Personally, I’m looking forward to the talks in the Infrastructure & Automation and the Kubernetes/Containers/Cloud Native Apps tracks.”

Here are just a few of the must-see cloud computing sessions:

As a kernel developer, Abbott gets excited when people talk about their future kernel work, especially when it involves the internals like the page cache or memory management. “I also love to see topics that talk about getting people involved in projects for the first time,” she said. “I’m also excited to see the Diversity Empowerment Summit and learning from the speakers there.”

You may wonder as we are moving toward the cloud native world, where everything is running in a cloud, does Linux even matter anymore? But, the fact is Linux is powering the cloud.

“Linux is what’s powering all those topics. When people say Linux. they’re usually referring to the complete platform from kernel to userspace libraries. You need a solid base to be able to run your application in the cloud. The entire community of Linux contributors enables today’s developers to work with the latest technologies,” said Abbott.

A few of the featured talks in the Linux Systems and Development track include:

Latest Trends

“DevOps is unsurprisingly a hot topic,” said Abbott. “There is a lot of focus on how to move towards newer best practices with projects like Kubernetes and how to best monitor your infrastructure. Blockchain technologies are a very hot topic. Some of this work is very forward looking but there’s a lot of interest in figuring out if blockchain can solve existing problems,” said Abbott.

That means OSSNA is the place to be if you are interested in emerging trends and technologies. “If you are looking to see what is coming next, or currently involved in Open Source, you should attend,” says Liles. “The venue is in a great location in Vancouver, so you can also take in the city between listening to your peers during talks or debating current trends during the hallway track,” said Liles.

Abbott concluded, “Anyone who is excited about Linux should attend. There’s people talking about such a wide variety of topics from kernel development to people management. There’s something for everyone.”

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Register for Open Source Summit by August 4 to save $150.

Here’s a sneak peek at why you need to be at Open Source Summit in Vancouver next month! But hurry – spots are going quickly. Secure your space and register by August 4 to save $150.

  1. Awesome content: 250+ sessions on Linux systems, cloud native development, cloud infrastructure, AI, blockchain and open source program management & community leadership.
  2. Deep Dive Labs & Tutorials: Including Hands-On with Cilium Network Security, Cloud-native Network Functions (CNF) Seminar, Istio Playground Lab, Practical Machine Learning Lab, First Tutorial on Container Orchestration plus many more – all included in one low registration price.
  3. 3. 9 Co-located Events: Linux Security Summit, OpenChain Summit, Acumos AI Developer Mini-Summit, Cloud & Container Apprentice Linux Engineer tutorials, CHAOSSCon and much more!
  4. Evening Events: Collaborate with fellow attendees at the Vancouver Aquarium and the onsite attendee reception.
  5. Activities: Take a break and go on a sightseeing bus tour, join the 5K fun run or morning meditation, meet with fellow attendees through the meet & eat experience or networking app, or play with puppies at the Puppy Pawlooza.
  6. Diversity Empowerment: Explore ways to advance diversity and inclusion in the community and across the technology industry by attending the Diversity Empowerment Summit & Better Together Diversity Social.
  7. Kids Day: Bring your kids and introduce them to the fun and magic of web design.
  8. Women in Open Source Lunch: Join women and non-binary members of the open source community for an engaging, uplifting lunch!
  9. Developer & Hallway Track Lounges: Lounges and reserved spaces for developers to hack and collaborate throughout the event.
  10. Networking Opportunities: Attend the Speed Networking & Mentoring event or use the networking app to expand your open source community connections by finding and meeting with attendees with similar interests.

VIEW THE FULL SCHEDULE »

Sign up to receive updates on Open Source Summit: 

REGISTER NOW »

Need help convincing your manager? Here’s a letter that can help you make the request to attend Open Source Summit.

Applications for diversity and needs-based scholarships are also being accepted. Get information on eligibility and how to apply. Free childcare is also available for attendees.

Open Source Summit

Greg Kroah-Hartman talks about the importance of community interaction, and the upcoming Open Source Summit.

People might not think about the Linux kernel all that much when talking about containers, serverless, and other hot technologies, but none of them would be possible without Linux as a solid base to build on, says Greg Kroah-Hartman.  He should know. Kroah-Hartman maintains the stable branch of the Linux kernel along with several subsystems.  He is also co-author of the Linux Kernel Development Report, a Fellow at The Linux Foundation, and he serves on the program committee for Open Source Summit.

Greg Kroah-Hartman (right) talks about the upcoming Open Source Summit. (Image copyright: Swapnil Bhartiya)

In this article, we talk with Kroah-Hartman about his long involvement with Linux, the importance of community interaction, and the upcoming Open Source Summit.

The Linux Foundation: New technologies (cloud, containers, machine learning, serverless) are popping up on weekly basis, what’s the importance of Linux in the changing landscape?

Greg K-H: There’s the old joke, “What’s a cloud made of? Linux servers.” That is truer than most people realize. All of those things you mention rely on Linux as a base technology to build on top of.  So while people might not think about “Linux the kernel” all that much when talking about containers, serverless and the other “buzzwords of the day,” none of them would be possible without Linux being there to ensure that there is a rock-solid base for everyone to build on top of.  

The goal of an operating system is to provide a computing platform to userspace that looks the same no matter what hardware it runs on top of.  Because of this, people can build these other applications and not care if they are running it locally on a Raspberry Pi or in a cloud on a shared giant PowerPC cluster as everywhere the application API is the same.

So, Linux is essential for all of these new technologies to work properly and scale and move to different places as needed.  Without it, getting any of those things working would be a much more difficult task.

LF: You have been involved with Linux for a very long time. Has your role changed within the community? You seem to focus a lot on security these days.

Greg K-H: I originally started out as a driver writer, then helped write the security layer in the kernel many many years ago.  From there I started to maintain the USB subsystem and then co-created the driver model. From there I ended up taking over more driver subsystems and when the idea for the stable kernel releases happened back in 2005, I was one of the developers who volunteered for that.

So for the past 13 years, I’ve been doing pretty much the same thing, not much has changed since then except the increased number of stable trees I maintain at the same time to try to keep devices in the wild more secure.

I’ve been part of the kernel security team I think since it was started back in the early 2000’s but that role is more of a “find who to point the bug at” type of thing.  The kernel security team is there to help take security problem reports and route them to the correct developer who maintains or knows that part of the kernel best.  The team has grown over the years as we have added the people that ended up getting called on the most to reduce the latency between reporting a bug and getting it fixed.

LF: We agree that Linux is being created by people all over the map, but once in a while it’s great to meet people in person. So, what role does Open Source Summit play in bringing these people together?

Greg K-H: Because open source projects are all developed by people who work for different companies and who live in different places, it’s important to get together when ever possible to actually meet the people behind the email if at all possible.  Development is an interaction that depends on trust, if I accept patches from you, then I am now responsible for those changes as well. If you disappear, I am on the hook for them, so either I need to ensure they are correct, or even better, I can know that you will be around to fix the code if there is a problem.  By meeting people directly, you can establish a face behind the email to help smooth over any potential disagreements that can easily happen due to the lack of “tone” in online communication.

It’s also great to meet developers of other projects to hear of ways they are abusing your project to get it to bend to their will, or learn of problems they are having that you did not know about.  Or just learn about new things that are being developed in totally different development groups.  The huge range of talks at a conference like this makes it easy to pick up on what is happening in a huge range of different developer communities easily.

LF: You obviously meet a lot of people during the event. Have you ever come across an incident where someone ended up becoming a contributor or maintainer because of the exposure such an event provided?

Greg K-H: At one of the OSS conferences last year, I met a college student who was attending the conference for the first time.  They mentioned that they were looking for any project ideas that someone with their skill level could help out with. At a talk later that day, a new idea for how to unify a specific subsystem of the kernel came up and how it was going “just take a bunch of grunt work” to accomplish.  Later that night, at the evening event, I saw the student again and mentioned the project to them and pointed them at the developer who asked for the help. They went off to talk in the corner about the specifics that would be needed to be done.

A few weeks later, a lot of patches started coming from the student and after a few rounds of review, were accepted by the maintainer.  More patches followed and eventually the majority of the work was done, which was great to see, the kernel really benefited from their contribution.

This year, I ran into the student again at another OSS conference and asked them what they were doing now.  Turns out they had gotten a job offer and were working for a Linux kernel company doing development on new products during their summer break.  Without that first interaction, meeting the developers directly that worked on the subsystem that needed the help, getting a job like that would have been much more difficult.

So, while I’m not saying that everyone who attends one of these types of conferences will instantly get a job, you will interact with developers who know what needs to be done in different areas of their open source projects.  And from there it is almost an easy jump to getting solid employment with one of the hundreds of companies that rely on these projects for their business.

LF: Are you also giving any talks at Open Source Summit?

Greg K-H:  I’m giving a talk about the Spectre and Meltdown problems that have happened this year.  It is a very high-level overview, going into the basics of what they are, and describing when the many different variants were announced and fixed in Linux.  This is a new security type of problem that is going to be with us for a very long time and I give some good tips on how to stay on top of the problem and ensure that your machines are safe.

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Call for Code

Todd Moore, Vice President Open Technology, IBM, speaks about the Call for Code initiative.

Open source is about community. At IBM, we have a commitment to open source and our developers are passionate about contributing back to open source. I’ve had the privilege to work with organizations like The Linux Foundation, Cloud Native Computing Foundation, Node.js Foundation, JS Foundation, Cloud Foundry Foundation, and many others. I’ve witnessed firsthand the power of communities to come together to grow an ecosystem, develop technology, and accelerate innovation. There’s also a human part to open source – a collective responsibility that we have to the world. There is work we can do that goes beyond developing platforms to grow our businesses and solve technical challenges. We can do more by focusing our combined developers, who already work together in open source, on critical problems that face humanity.

David Clark Cause is a company that creates purpose based initiatives and brings stakeholders together to tackle a common cause. Last year, David Clark Cause came to us with an opportunity to rally developers around a common cause and have a lasting impact.  We’ve done work like this before – for example, our IBM Foundation is working with the Open Medical Records (OpenMRS) project to create an oncology suite for use in countries in Africa and other regions using this open technology. The IBM Corporate Citizenship Office has helped deploy software from the Sahana Foundation’s open source disaster management solutions in over a dozen countries.

Given 2017 was one of the worst years on record for natural disasters, we decided to focus the efforts of 22 million developers around the world on this cause through the Call for Code initiative. David Clark Cause gave us the inspiration, and other partners like the United Nations, the American Red Cross, and The Linux Foundation came together to pool our collective efforts. Since 2000, natural disasters have directly affected 2.5 billion people, with 1.5 trillion in economic impact since 2003. And over the last 30 years, flooding is up over 240%. As developers, we can help people be more prepared, help them during a natural disaster, and help them recover afterward. We can make communities more resilient together.

Call for Code judges include iconic developers like Linus Torvalds and Tim Berners-Lee. The winning team and two semifinalists will receive support from The Linux Foundation to host their submission as an open source project and build a community around it, ensuring that it is deployable around the world in the areas of greatest need. Please join us- learn more at callforcode.org.

Open FinTech

Speak at Open FinTech Forum, coming up this fall in New York.

Focusing on the intersection of financial services and open source, Open FinTech Forum will provide CIOs and senior technologists guidance on building internal open source programs and an in-depth look at cutting edge open source technologies including AI, Blockchain, Cloud Native & Kubernetes/Containers, Quantum Computing that can be leveraged to drive efficiencies and flexibility.

The call for speaking proposals is open through July 21st. If you are interested in sharing your experience with this audience, we’d like to hear from you. We’re looking for talks including project roadmaps from key community developers to use cases from those IT professionals in financial services or related verticals on their open source implementations.

Learn more about the CFP process, see a full list of suggested topics and submit by July 21. Update: The CFP closed on July 21. If you’re interested in speaking at other Linux Foundation events, learn more here: https://events.linuxfoundation.org/.

Submit Now >>

Sign up to receive updates on Open FinTech Forum, happening October 10-11 in New York:

Already confirmed Open FinTech Forum 2018 speakers include:

  • Chris Aniszczyk, CTO/COO, Cloud Native Computing Foundationand Co-Founder, TODO Group
  • Brian Behlendorf, Executive Director, Hyperledger
  • Karen Copenhaver, Leading IP Strategist
  • Sally Eaves, CTO, Professor of FinTech Practice, Global Strategic Advisor and Author, Forbes Technology Council
  • Ibrahim Haddad, Vice President of R&D, Samsung Electronics
  • Keith Laban, Software Engineer, Bloomberg
  • Yuri Litvinovich, Senior Cloud Engineer, Scotia Bank
  • Ania Musial, Senior Software Engineer, Machine Learning Platform, Bloomberg
  • Robert Palatnick, Managing Director and Chief Technology Architect, DTCC
  • Jason Poley, Distinguished Engineer/VP Cloud Architect, Barclays
  • Justin Rackliffe, Director, Open Source Governance at Fidelity Investments
  • Kate Stewart, Senior Director of Strategic Projects, The Linux Foundation
  • Bob Sutor, Vice President for IBM Q Strategy and Ecosystem, IBM Research

The full schedule of sessions will be announced in August.

Not interesting in speaking, but thinking of attending?

Open FinTech Forum will better inform IT decision-makers about the open technologies driving digital transformation and how to best utilize an open source strategy and implementation to enable new products, services and capabilities; increase IT efficiencies; establish and strengthen internal license compliance programs; attract top level talent; and train existing talent on the latest disruptive technologies. Register now to attend.

Register Now>>

Linux Foundation members and LF project members receive a 20% discount on registration pricing. FinTech CIOs and senior technologists may receive a 50% discount on registration fees.

Email events@linuxfoundation.org for discount codes.

Call for Code

Answer the Call for Code. (Image: developerWorks TV)

The Call for Code initiative aims to harness the collective power of the global open source developer community against the growing threat of natural disasters. According to IBM, “the goal is to develop technology solutions that significantly improve disaster preparedness, provide relief from devastation caused by fires, floods, hurricanes, tsunamis and earthquakes, and benefit Call for Code’s charitable partners — the United Nations Human Rights Office and the American Red Cross.”

In a recent webcast — How 22M Developers Take on Disaster Preparedness — Mary Glackin, SVP of Science & Forecast at The Weather Company and IBM Business, spoke with representatives from participating organizations about the initiative and some of the specific goals it aims to achieve.

The Call for Code is “encouraging the global community of developers to stand up for the rights of others,” said Laurent Sauveur, Chief of External Relations, UN Human Rights.   

“It’s an exciting cause and it’s a meaningful one,” said Trishan de Lanerolle, Program Manager, Networking at The Linux Foundation, which will host the code developed through this initiative.

Additionally, Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux and Git, will join a panel of technologists to evaluate submissions. Once complete, the winning solution will be deployed in the real world. Angel Diaz, VP Developer, IBM, explained that The Linux Foundation will host the code under the Apache 2.0 license, which will allow the code to evolve and improve even beyond the scope of this contest.

Practical Solutions

“Technology can be a wonderful and very powerful force for good,” said Sauveur, and it can improve things like tracking of aid delivery and communication in crisis situations to help pinpoint areas of need.

Getting people what they need, when they need it, and where they need it to alleviate suffering is key, said Brad Kieserman, Vice President of Disaster Cycle Services American Red Cross. And, the science of where is critical: where is the damage, where are the resources, where do they need to be?

Predictive analytics are at the center of this practice, said Kieserman, to help visualize data relating to the movement of people and resources.  “As models of service delivery improve, we can better understand the need and increase efficiency.”

Ben Narasin, Venture Partner, New Enterprise Associates offered tips for approaching the development challenge. When building such solutions, he said, it’s important to consider scale.  You need an idea that can scale, you need to build code that can scale, and you need to look at building a team that can scale.

“You cannot look at this from the perspective of ‘I have a cool technology that I want to deploy that will solve this problem.’” said de Lanerolle. “You have to think about your product being used in resource-poor environments.” For example, you have to consider things like connectivity and battery life and how to get your data at the end of the day. Such last mile challenges are critical, and open source can help.

Don’t reinvent the wheel, said de Lanerolle. “Take the opportunity to look at what’s out there.” He suggests looking at “existing technologies that are backed by open source projects where you can build resources that are available for everybody rather than just building out a one-time solution.”

Commit to the Cause

If you’re a coder, sign up, and if you’re interested, spread the word, said Glackin. “We can all be involved. Let’s all answer the call for code and make a difference in the world.”

We invite you to amplify the initiative and join the call. You can learn more about the Call for Code and watch the complete webcast here: http://ibm.biz/BdYxHZ.

Open Source Leadership

Building leadership in the community is key to establishing trust, enabling collaboration, and fostering the cultural understanding required to be effective in open source.

How important is leadership for evolving open source projects and communities? According to the most recent Open Source Guide for the Enterprise from The Linux Foundation and the TODO Group, building leadership in the community is key to establishing trust, enabling collaboration, and fostering the cultural understanding required to be effective in open source.

The new Building Leadership in an Open Source Community guide provides practical advice that can help organizations build leadership and influence within open source projects.

“Contributing code is just one aspect of creating a successful open source project,” says this Linux Foundation article introducing the latest guide. “The open source culture is fundamentally collaborative, and active involvement in shaping a project’s direction is equally important. The path toward leadership is not always straightforward, however, so the latest Open Source Guide for the Enterprise from The TODO Group provides practical advice for building leadership in open source projects and communities.” 

Indeed, the role of leadership in open source is often misunderstood, precisely because open source projects and communities are often structured to encourage highly distributed contribution models. Their distributed structure can obscure the need for central leaders who set goals and measure progress.

More Resources

In addition to the new guide, previous Open Source Guides for Enterprise explore related aspects of open source leadership. Here are some good ones to investigate:

  • Creating an Open Source Program. Open source program offices are emerging as critical to providing good leadership, and this free guide delves into how they can become designated places where open source is supported, nurtured, shared, explained, and grown inside a company.
  • Measuring Your Open Source Program’s Success. Good leaders of all types are skilled at measuring progress, and they stay on top of the right tools for working with metrics and project management. This free guide lays out a clear path for open source leaders to measure progress and set goals.
  • Recruiting Open Source Developers. Guy Martin, Director, Open at Autodesk, has noted that when interviewing developers, he is frequently asked how the company will help the developer build his or her own open source brand. Today, leadership calls for strategically appealing to developers and this free guide includes many best practices.
  • Improving Your Open Source Development Impact also delves into these topics. It examines various ways organizations can improve their internal development processes and prepare to contribute to open source projects.

Building Leadership in an Open Source Community, which features contributions from Gil Yehuda of Oath and Guy Martin of Autodesk, looks at how decisions are made, how to attract talent, when to join vs. when to create an open source project, and it offers specific approaches to becoming a good leader in open source communities.

“Companies often go through a phase of thinking ‘Oh, well, we’re huge. Why can’t we pound our fist on the table and just make the community do what we want?’ They soon come to realize that tactic won’t work,” writes Martin, in the guide. “They come to understand that the only way to gain leadership is to earn the role within the community. And the only way to do that is to gain credibility and make contributions.”

You’ll find the complete guide here, and you can browse an entire list of free Open Source Guides here.