Greg Kroah-Hartman

Greg Kroah-Hartman

Fellow

Greg is among a distinguished group of software developers who maintain Linux at the kernel level. In his role as Linux Foundation Fellow, he continues his work as the maintainer for the Linux stable kernel branch and a variety of subsystems while working in a fully neutral environment.

Greg Kroah-Hartman

Greg Kroah-Hartman

Fellow

Greg is among a distinguished group of software developers who maintain Linux at the kernel level. In his role as Linux Foundation Fellow, he continues his work as the maintainer for the Linux stable kernel branch and a variety of subsystems while working in a fully neutral environment. He also works closely with The Linux Foundation members, workgroups, Labs projects (http://www.linuxfoundation.org/labs), and staff on key initiatives to advance Linux.

Greg created and maintains the Linux Driver Project. He is also currently the maintainer for the Linux stable kernel branch and a variety of different subsystems that include USB, staging, driver core, tty, and sysfs, among others. Most recently, he was a Fellow at SUSE. Greg is an adviser to Oregon State University’s Open Source Lab, a member of The Linux Foundation's Technical Advisory Board, has delivered a variety of keynote addresses at developer and industry events, and has authored two books covering Linux device drivers and Linux kernel development.

janina

Janina Sajka

Fellow

Janina is the Executive Chair of the Accessibility workgroup.

janina

Janina Sajka

Fellow

linus

Linus Torvalds

Fellow

Linus Torvalds created the Linux kernel and Git and oversees open source development of the Linux operating system, the world's largest and most pervasive open source software project in history.

linus

Linus Torvalds

Fellow

Linus was born on December 28, 1969 in Helsinki, Finland. He enrolled at the University of Helsinki in 1988, graduating with a master's degree in computer science. His M.Sc. thesis was titled “Linux: A Portable Operating System” and was the genesis for what would become the most important collaborative software project in history.

In August 1991, Linus announced that he was developing the Linux kernel, proclaiming, “it won’t be big and professional.” Never in the history of technology has someone been so wrong. In spite of his humble proclamation, Linux has become the world’s most pervasive operating system. Today the Linux kernel forms the basis of the Linux operating system and powers billions of Android devices, powers ChromeOS, and has permeated almost every industry and form factor.  Smartphones, TVs, appliances, cars, nuclear submarines, air traffic control, stock exchanges, and scientific research all run Linux. Linux also provides the underpinnings of the internet and the cloud computing industry.

In 2005, citing a lack of free and open source version control tools that met his needs for performance and scale, Linus famously created Git in only 10 days. Today Git is widely used in software development and for other version-control tasks such as configuration management, and has become popular as an integral part of the DevOps culture.

In 2000, Linus was listed by Time Magazine as Number 17 in the Time 100: Most Important People of the Century.  Again, in 2004, Time Magazine named him one of the Most Influential People in the world. He was honored in 2008 with the  Millennium Technology Prize by the Technology Academy Finland, “in recognition of his creation of a new open source operating system for computers leading to the widely used Linux kernel.” He is also the recipient of the 2014 IEEE Computer Society Computer Pioneer Award. A true tech titan, he was admitted to the Computer History Museum Hall of Fellows, joining the ranks of the tech elite including Rear Admiral Grace Murray Hopper, Tim Berners-Lee, Gordon Moore, Ken Thompson, Dennis Ritchie, Steve Wozniak, and others.

Torvalds remains the ultimate authority on what new code is incorporated into the standard Linux kernel.

richard

Richard Purdie

Fellow

Richard is a developer and maintainer of the OpenEmbedded software project, and the architect and maintainer of the Yocto Project and Poky Build System.

richard

Richard Purdie

Fellow

Richard is a developer and maintainer of the OpenEmbedded software project, and the architect and maintainer of the Yocto Project and Poky Build System. Most recently he was an Embedded Linux Architect for Intel's Open Source Technology Center. From 2005 to 2008, he was a software engineer at OpenedHand, where he worked with a variety of other open source projects such as Clutter, X server, Zaurus, and Oprofile. He has also made numerous contributions to the Linux kernel, including as maintainer of the backlight and LED subsystems. Purdie received his MSci in Physics from University of Durham in 2003.

Thomas Gleixner

Thomas Gleixner

Fellow

Long time Linux kernel hacker with embedded background and a strong affinity to impossible missions.

Thomas Gleixner

Thomas Gleixner

Fellow

Long time Linux kernel hacker with embedded background and a strong affinity to impossible missions.

Till Kamppeter

Till Kamppeter

Fellow

Till Kamppeter holds a PhD in Theoretical Physics and has worked with printing under Linux and Unix since mid-2000, when he was invited to work as a developer at MandrakeSoft (now Mandriva) in Paris.

Till Kamppeter

Till Kamppeter

Fellow

Till Kamppeter holds a PhD in Theoretical Physics and has worked with printing under Linux and Unix since mid-2000, when he got invited to work as a developer at MandrakeSoft (now Mandriva) in Paris. There he did the packaging of the printing-related software for the distribution, and since 2001 he was leader of the linuxprinting.org project. He also participated in the work of the OpenPrinting workgroup. In 2006, he was invited to work for the Free Standards Group (now The Linux Foundation) merging linuxprinting.org into OpenPrinting and leading the OpenPrinting project full time.

Since 2000, Kamppeter has given several printing-related talks and tutorials on conferences, organized booths on Linux shows, and wrote articles in magazines about Linux. Since 2006 he has been organizing an annual three-day OpenPrinting Summit, currently together with the annual Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit. With OpenPrinting, he leads the development of new printing architectures, technologies, printing infrastructure, and interface standards for Linux and Unix-style operating systems. For this he is in contact with the leading printer manufacturers, all relevant free software projects, and the distribution vendors.

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