peanut farm field with tech UI overlay

One of the first projects I noticed after starting at the Linux Foundation was AgStack. It caught my attention because I have a natural inclination towards farming and ranching, although, in reality, I really just want a reason to own and use a John Deere tractor (or more than one). The reality is the closest I will ever get to being a farmer is my backyard garden with, perhaps, some chickens one day. But I did work in agriculture policy for a number of years, including some time at USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service. So, AgStack piqued my interest. Most people don’t really understand where their food comes from, the challenges that exist across the globe, and the innovation that is still possible in agriculture. It is encouraging to see the passion and innovation coming from the folks at AgStack.

Speaking of that, I want to dig into (pun intended) one of AgStacks’ projects, Ag-Rec.

Backing up a bit, in the United States, the U.S. Department of Agriculture operates a vast network of cooperative extension offices to help farmers, ranchers, and even gardeners improve their practices. They have proven themselves to be invaluable resources and are credited with improving agriculture practices both here in the U.S. and around the globe through research, information sharing, and partnerships. Even if you aren’t a farmer, they can help you with your garden, lawn, and more. Give them a call – almost every county has an office.

The reality with extension education is that it is still heavily reliant on individuals going to offices and reading printed materials or PDFs. It could use an upgrade to help the data be more easily digestible, to make it quicker to update, to expand the information available, and to facilitate information sharing around the world. Enter Ag-Rec. 

I listened to Brandy Byrd and Gaurav Ramakrishna, both with IBM, present about Ag-Rec at the Open Source Summit 2022 in Austin, Texas. 

Brandy is a native of rural South Carolina, raised in an area where everyone farmed. She recalled some words of wisdom her granddaddy always said, “Never sell the goose that laid the golden egg.” He was referring to the value of the farmland – it was their livelihood. She grew up seeing firsthand the value of farms, and she was already familiar with the value of the information from the extension service and of information sharing among farmers and ranchers beyond mornings at the local coffee shop. But she also sees a better way. 

The vision of Ag-Rec is a framework where rural farmers from small SC towns to anywhere in the world have the same cooperative extension framework where they can get info, advice, and community. They don’t have to go to an office or have a physical manual. They can access a wealth of information and that can be shared anywhere, anytime. 

On top of that, by making it open source, anyone can use the framework so anyone can build applications and make the data available in new and useful ways. Ag-Rec is providing the base for even more innovation. Imagine the innovation we don’t know is possible. 

The Roadmap

Brandy and Gaurav shared about how Ag-Rec is being built and how developers, UI experts, agriculture practices experts, end users, and others can help contribute. When the recording of the presentation is available we will share that here. You can also go over to Ag-Rec’s GitHub for more information and to help. 

Here is the current roadmap: 

Immediate

  • Design and development of UI with Mojoe.net
  • Plant data validation and enhancements
  • Gather requirements to provision additional Extensive Service recommendation data
  • Integrate User Registry for authentication and authorization

Mid-term

  • Testing and feedback from stakeholders
  • Deploy the solution on AgStack Cloud
  • Add documentation for external contribution and self-deployment

Long-term

  • Invite other Extension Services and communities
  • Iterate and continuous improvement

I, for one, am excited about the possibility of this program to help improve crop production, agricultural-land conservation, pest management, and more around the world. Farms feed the world, fuel economies, and so much more. With even better practices, their positive impact can be even greater while helping conserve the earth’s resources. 

The Partners


In May 2021, the Linux Foundation launched the AgStack Foundation to “build and sustain the global data infrastructure for food and agriculture to help scale digital transformation and address climate change, rural engagement, and food and water security.”  Not long after, IBM, Call for Code and Clemson University Cooperative Extension “sought to digitize data that’s been collected over the years, making it accessible to anyone on their phone or computer to search data and find answers they need.” AgStack “way to collaborate with and gain insights from a community of people working on similar ideas, and this helped the team make progress quickly.” And Ag-Rec was born. 

A special thank you to the core team cultivating (pun intended) this innovation: 

Brandy Byrd, IBM

Gaurav Ramakrishna, IBM

Sumer Johal, AgStack

Kendall Kirk, Clemson University

Mallory Douglass, Clemson University

Mojoe.net

Resources

1 + 1 = 3

At last week’’s Open Source Summit North America, Robin Ginn, Executive Director of the OpenJS Foundation, relayed a principle her mentor taught: “1+1=3”. No, this isn’t ‘new math,’ it is demonstrating the principle that, working together, we are more impactful than working apart. Or, as my wife and I say all of the time, teamwork makes the dream work. 

This principle is really at the core of open source technology. Turns out it is also how I look at the Open Programmable Infrastructure project. 

Stepping back a bit, as “the new guy” around here, I am still constantly running across projects where I want to dig in more and understand what it does, how it does it, and why it is important. I had that very thought last week as we launched another new project, the Open Programmable Infrastructure Project. As I was reading up on it, they talked a lot about data processing units (DPUs) and infrastructure processing units (IPUs), and I thought, I need to know what these are and why they matter. In the timeless words of The Bobs, “What exactly is it you do here?” 

What are DPUs/IPUs? 

First – and this is important – they are basically the same thing, they just have different names. Here is my oversimplified explanation of what they do.

In most personal computers, you have a separate graphic processing unit(s) that helps the central 1 + 1 = 3 processing unit(s) (CPU) handle the tasks related to processing and displaying the graphics. They offload that work from the CPU, allowing it to spend more time on the tasks it does best. So, working together, they can achieve more than each can separately. 

Servers powering the cloud also have CPUs, but they have other tasks that can consume tremendous computing  power, say data encryption or network packet management. Offloading these tasks to separate processors enhances the performance of the whole system, as each processor focuses on what it does best. 

In order words, 1+1=3. 

DPUs/IPUs are highly customizable

While separate processing units have been around for some time, like your PC’s GPU, their functionally was primarily dedicated to a particular task. Instead, DPUs/IPUs combine multiple offload capabilities that are highly  customizable through software. That means a hardware manufacturer can ship these units out and each organization uses software to configure the units according to their specific needs. And, they can do this on the fly. 

Core to the cloud and its continued advancement and growth is the ability to quickly and easily create and dispose of the “hardware” you need. It wasn’t too long ago that if you wanted a server, you spent thousands of dollars on one and built all kinds of infrastructure around it and hoped it was what you needed for the time. Now, pretty much anyone can quickly setup a virtual server in a matter of minutes for virtually no initial cost. 

DPUs/IPUs bring this same type of flexibility to your own datacenter because they can be configured to be “specialized” with software rather than having to literally design and build a different server every time you need a different capability. 

What is Open Programmable Infrastructure (OPI)?

OPI is focused on utilizing  open software and standards, as well as frameworks and toolkits, to allow for the rapid adoption and use of DPUs/IPUs. The OPI Project is both hardware and software companies coming together to establish and nurture an ecosystem to support these solutions. It “seeks to help define the architecture and frameworks for the DPU and IPU software stacks that can be applied to any vendor’s hardware offerings. The OPI Project also aims to foster a rich open source application ecosystem, leveraging existing open source projects, such as DPDK, SPDK, OvS, P4, etc., as appropriate.”

In other words, competitors are coming together to agree on a common, open ecosystem they can build together and innovate, separately, on top of. The are living out 1+1=3.

I, for one, can’t wait to see the innovation.

A special thanks to Yan Fisher of Red Hat for helping me understand open programmable infrastructure concepts. He and his colleague, Kris Murphy, have a more technical blog post on Red Hat’s blog. Check it out. 

For more information on the OPI Project, visit their website and start contributing at https://github.com/opiproject/opi.  

Click here to add your own text

jetliner flying

In a new white paper, the Cardea Project at Linux Foundation Public Health demonstrates a complete, decentralized, open source system for sharing medical data in a privacy-preserving way with machine readable governance for establishing trust.

The Cardea Project began as a response to the global Covid-19 pandemic and the need for countries and airlines to admit travelers. As Covid shut down air travel and presented an existential threat to countries whose economies depended on tourism, SITA Aero, the largest provider of IT technology to the air transport sector, saw decentralized identity technology as the ideal solution to manage a proof of Covid test status for travel.

With a verifiable credential, a traveler could hold their health data and not only prove they had a specific test at a specific time, they could use it—or a derivative credential—to prove their test status to enter hotels and hospitality spaces without having to divulge any personal information. Entities that needed to verify a traveler’s test status could, in turn, avoid the complexity of direct integrations with healthcare providers and the challenge of complying with onerous health data privacy law.

Developed by Indicio with SITA and the government of Aruba, the technology was successfully trialed in 2021 and the code specifically developed for the project was donated to Linux Foundation Public Health (LFPH) as a way for any public health authority to implement an open source, privacy-preserving way to manage Covid test and vaccination data. The Cardea codebase continues to develop at LFPH as Indicio, SITA, and the Cardea Community Group extend its features and applications beyond Covid-related data.

On May 22, 2022 at the 15th KuppingerCole European Identity and Cloud Conference in Berlin, SITA won the Verifiable Credentials and Decentralized Identity Award for its implementation of decentralized identity in Aruba.

The new white paper from the Cardea Project provides an in-depth examination of the background to Cardea, the transformational power of decentralized identity technology, how it works, the implementation in Aruba, and how it can be deployed to authenticate and share multiple kinds of health data in privacy-preserving ways. As the white paper notes:

“…Cardea is more than a solution for managing COVID-19 testing; it is a way to manage any health-related process where critical and personal information needs to be shared and verified in a way that enables privacy and enhances security. It is able to meet the requirements of the 21st Century Cures Act and Europe’s General Data Protection Regulation, and in doing so enable use cases that range from simple proof of identity to interoperating ecosystems encompassing multiple cloud services, organizations, and sectors, where data needs to be, and can be, shared in immediately actionable ways.

Open source, interoperable decentralized identity technology is the only viable way to manage both the challenges of the present—where entire health systems can be held at ransom through identity-based breaches—and the opportunities presented by a digital future where digital twins, smart hospitals, and spatial web applications will reshape how healthcare is managed and delivered.”

The white paper is available here. The community development group meets weekly on Thursdays at 9:00am PST—please join us!

This article was originally published on the Linux Foundation Public Health project’s blog


Data Processing and Infrastructure Processing Units – DPU and IPU – are changing the way enterprises deploy and manage compute resources across their networks; OPI will nurture an ecosystem to enable easy adoption of these innovative technologies 

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif.,  – June 21, 2022 The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization enabling mass innovation through open source, today announced the new Open Programmable Infrastructure (OPI) Project. OPI will foster a community-driven, standards-based open ecosystem for next-generation architectures and frameworks based on DPU and IPU technologies. OPI is designed to facilitate the simplification of network, storage and security APIs within applications to enable more portable and performant applications in the cloud and datacenter across DevOps, SecOps and NetOps. 

Founding members of OPI include Dell Technologies, F5, Intel, Keysight Technologies, Marvell, NVIDIA and Red Hat with a growing number of contributors representing a broad range of leading companies in their fields ranging from silicon and device manufactures, ISVs, test and measurement partners, OEMs to end users. 

“When new technologies emerge, there is so much opportunity for both technical and business innovation but barriers often include a lack of open standards and a thriving community to support them,” said Mike Dolan, senior vice president of Projects at the Linux Foundation. “DPUs and IPUs are great examples of some of the most promising technologies emerging today for cloud and datacenter, and OPI is poised to accelerate adoption and opportunity by supporting an ecosystem for DPU and IPU technologies.

DPUs and IPUs are increasingly being used to support high-speed network capabilities and packet processing for applications like 5G, AI/ML, Web3, crypto and more because of their flexibility in managing resources across networking, compute, security and storage domains. Instead of the servers being the infrastructure unit for cloud, edge or the data center, operators can now create pools of disaggregated networking, compute and storage resources supported by DPUs, IPUs, GPUs, and CPUs to meet their customers’ application workloads and scaling requirements.

OPI will help establish and nurture an open and creative software ecosystem for DPU and IPU-based infrastructures. As more DPUs and IPUs are offered by various vendors, the OPI Project seeks to help define the architecture and frameworks for the DPU and IPU software stacks that can be applied to any vendor’s hardware offerings. The OPI Project also aims to foster a rich open source application ecosystem, leveraging existing open source projects, such as DPDK, SPDK, OvS, P4, etc., as appropriate.  The project intends to:

  • Define DPU and IPU, 
  • Delineate vendor-agnostic frameworks and architectures for DPU- and IPU-based software stacks applicable to any hardware solutions, 
  • Enable the creation of a rich open source application ecosystem,
  • Integrate with existing open source projects aligned to the same vision such as the Linux kernel, and, 
  • Create new APIs for interaction with, and between, the elements of the DPU and IPU ecosystem, including hardware, hosted applications, host node, and the remote provisioning and orchestration of software

With several working groups already active, the initial technology contributions will come in the form of the Infrastructure Programmer Development Kit (IPDK) that is now an official sub-project of OPI governed by the Linux Foundation. IPDK is an open source framework of drivers and APIs for infrastructure offload and management that runs on a CPU, IPU, DPU or switch. 

In addition, NVIDIA DOCA , an open source software development framework for NVIDIA’s BlueField DPU, will be contributed to OPI to help developers create applications that can be offloaded, accelerated, and isolated across DPUs, IPUs, and other hardware platforms. 

For more information visit: https://opiproject.org; start contributing here: https://github.com/opiproject/opi.

Founding Member Comments

Geng Lin, EVP and Chief Technology Officer, F5

“The emerging DPU market is a golden opportunity to reimagine how infrastructure services can be deployed and managed. With collective collaboration across many vendors representing both the silicon devices and the entire DPU software stack, an ecosystem is emerging that will provide a low friction customer experience and achieve portability of services across a DPU enabled infrastructure layer of next generation data centers, private clouds, and edge deployments.”

Patricia Kummrow, CVP and GM, Ethernet Products Group, Intel

Intel is committed to open software to advance collaborative and competitive ecosystems and is pleased to be a founding member of the Open Programmable Infrastructure project, as well as fully supportive of the Infrastructure Processor Development Kit (IPDK) as part of OPI. We look forward to advancing these tools, with the Linux Foundation, fulfilling the need for a programmable infrastructure across cloud, data center, communication and enterprise industries making it easier for developers to accelerate innovation and advance technological developments.

Ram Periakaruppan, VP and General Manager, Network Test and Security Solutions Group, Keysight Technologies 

“Programmable infrastructure built with DPUs/IPUs enables significant innovation for networking, security, storage and other areas in disaggregated cloud environments. As a founding member of the Open Programmable Infrastructure Project, we are committed to providing our test and validation expertise as we collaboratively develop and foster a standards-based open ecosystem that furthers infrastructure development, enabling cloud providers to maximize their investment.”

Cary Ussery, Vice President, Software and Support, Processors, Marvell

Data center operators across multiple industry segments are increasingly incorporating DPUs as an integral part of their infrastructure processing to offload complex workloads from general purpose to more robust compute platforms. Marvell strongly believes that software standardization in the ecosystem will significantly contribute to the success of workload acceleration solutions. As a founding member of the OPI Project, Marvell aims to address the need for standardization of software frameworks used in provisioning, lifecycle management, orchestration, virtualization and deployment of workloads.

Kevin Deierling, vice president of Networking at NVIDIA 

“The fundamental architecture of data centers is evolving to meet the demands of private and hyperscale clouds and AI, which require extreme performance enabled by DPUs such as the NVIDIA BlueField and open frameworks such as NVIDIA DOCA. These will support OPI to provide BlueField users with extreme acceleration, enabled by common, multi-vendor management and applications. NVIDIA is a founding member of the Linux Foundation’s Open Programmable Infrastructure Project to continue pushing the boundaries of networking performance and accelerated data center infrastructure while championing open standards and ecosystems.”

Erin Boyd, director of emerging technologies, Red Hat

“As a founding member of the Open Programmable Infrastructure project, Red Hat is committed to helping promote, grow and collaborate on the emergent advantage that new hardware stacks can bring to the cloud-native community, and we believe that the formalization of OPI into the Linux Foundation is an important step toward achieving this in an open and transparent fashion. Establishing an open standards-based ecosystem will enable us to create fully programmable infrastructure, opening up new possibilities for better performance, consumption, and the ability to more easily manage unique hardware at scale.”

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation and its projects are supported by more than 1,800 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, Hyperledger, RISC-V, and more.  The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

###

 

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds. Red Hat is a registered trademark of Red Hat, Inc. or its subsidiaries in the U.S. and other countries.

Marvell Disclaimer: This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the federal securities laws that involve risks and uncertainties. Forward-looking statements include, without limitation, any statement that may predict, forecast, indicate or imply future events or achievements. Actual events or results may differ materially from those contemplated in this press release. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date they are made. Readers are cautioned not to put undue reliance on forward-looking statements, and no person assumes any obligation to update or revise any such forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.

Media Contact
Carolyn Lehman
The Linux Foundation
clehman@linuxfoundation.org

Click here to add your own text

junu and charmed projects from FINOS open source project

The article by Srikrishna ‘Kris’ Sharma with Canonical originally appeared in the FINOS Project’s Community Blog. It is another example of enterprises open sourcing their code so that they can “collectively solve common problems so they can separately innovate and differentiate on top of the common baseline.” Read more about Why Do Enterprises Use and Contribute to Open Source Software.

Orchestrating Legend with Juju

Goldman Sachs open sourced the code and contributed its internally developed Legend data management platform into FINOS in October 2020.  Legend provides an end-to-end data platform experience covering the full data lifecycle. It encompasses a suite of data management and governance components known as the Legend Platform. Legend enables breaking down silos and building a critical bridge over the historical divide between business and engineering, allowing companies to build data-driven applications and insightful business intelligence dashboards.

Accelerate FINOS Open Source Project Adoption

Ease and speed of deployment enables innovation and lowers the barrier of entry to open source consumption and contribution. Engineering experience is about leveraging software ops automation to demonstrate impact of an open source project to the community. An awesome engineering experience is more often required to enable wider adoption and contribution to an open source project.

Over the last few months, Canonical has been working closely with FINOS and its community members to offer a consistent way to deploy and manage enterprise applications using Juju and Charmed Operators with a focus on Day 2 operations. The idea is to provide a software ops automation framework and toolkit that enables the DevOps teams at financial institutions to realise the benefits of rapid deployment/ testing and application management using a platform that is 100% open source, vendor-agnostic and hybrid-multi-cloud ready.

What is Juju and Charmed Operator?

Charmed Operator:

A charmed operator (also known, more simply, as a “charm”) encapsulates a single application and all the code and know-how it takes to operate it, such as how to combine and work with other related applications or how to upgrade it. Charms are programmed to understand a single application, its operations, and its potential to integrate with other applications. A charm defines and enables the channels by which applications connect. Hundreds of charms are available at charmhub.io.

Juju Operator Lifecycle Manager (OLM) is a hybrid-cloud application management and orchestration system for installation and day 2 operations. It helps deploy, configure, scale, integrate, maintain, and manage Kubernetes native, container-native and VM-native applications—and the relations between them.

Juju allows anyone to deploy and operate charmed operators (charms) in any cloud–including Kubernetes, VMs and Metal. Charms encapsulate the application plus deployment and operations knowledge into one single reusable artefact. Juju manages the lifecycle of applications and infrastructure stacks from cloud to the edge. Juju is cloud-vendor agnostic and hybrid-multi-cloud by nature: it can manage the lifecycle of applications in public clouds, private clouds, or on bare metal. Once bootstrapped, Juju will offer the same deployment and operations experience regardless of the cloud vendor.

The Legend Charm Bundle

In the spirit of providing an enterprise-grade automated deployment and maintenance experience to FINOS members, Canonical created a charmed bundle for Legend and contributed it to FINOS.

The Legend Charm Bundle provides a simple, efficient and enterprise-ready way to deploy and orchestrate a Legend instance in various environments across the CI/CD pipeline, from developer’s workstation to production environment. The bundle includes several Charmed Operators, one for each Legend component.

Why a Legend Charm Bundle?

  1. A simple way to evaluate Legend
    One can spin up a Legend environment from scratch using one single command juju deploy finos-legend-bundle
  2. An intuitive approach (for banks and other financial institutions) to spin up production environments
  3. Provides orchestration capabilities, not only deployment scripting
  4. Easily plugs into Legend release lifecycle and simplifies Legend FINOS instance maintenance

The Legend charm documentation resides on finos/legend-integration-juju github repository and here is the link to related repositories.multiple components.

Detailed instructions are available for local and cloud installations if you would like to spin up your own Legend instance within a few mins and start using Legend either locally or on AWS EKS.

The Fintech Open Source Foundation continues to expand support across all constituents and geographies with increased buy-side, cloud and financial technology representation

New York, NY – May 31 – The Fintech Open Source Foundation (FINOS), the financial services umbrella of the Linux Foundation, announced today the addition of six new corporate members, including Google Cloud, Société Générale, American Express, Point72, Mirantis, and The Digital Dollar Project. Building upon its 19 new Members in 2021 and its recent addition of Wellington Management Company to its Governing Board, FINOS now has 57 corporate members ushering a new era in open collaboration across the global financial services industry. 

These new members, as well as the entire FINOS ecosystem will meet in London on July 13 at its annual Open Source in Finance Forum

This addition of new members reinforces FINOS’ position as the arena of choice to build the next generation of financial technologies on common standards and open source components for financial institutions on both the sell-side and buy-side, fintechs, cloud companies, regulators, industry consortia and individual contributors. FINOS continues to see growth in the number and diversity of its corporate members across the world, with more than a 35% increase in the number of members year-over-year, fueling a community of more than 1,200 active contributors. This announcement is particularly significant as the engagement of cloud vendors and new buy-side firms signals widespread reception of open source return on investment across the technology value chain as a whole.

“We are at a pivotal moment in our evolution as a Community, where literally every constituent of the industry has come to the realization that open source collaboration has the concrete potential to bring to life the vision of a highly efficient, interoperable and developer-friendly global financial technology stack,” said Gabriele Columbro, Executive Director of FINOS. “From cloud and open source leaders heading the charge to some of the historically most conservative firms in the world now rolling out Open Source Program Offices (OSPOs), we are incredibly proud to see global recognition of the value in open source and of the role FINOS played in this evolution.” 

Meet the new members 

Google Cloud becomes the first global cloud service provider joining FINOS as a Gold member. Google Cloud will contribute to critical efforts for cloud deployments in financial services like the FINOS Open RegTech and Compliant Financial Infrastructure initiatives, aimed at driving adoption of FINOS open source projects in the cloud. 

“For more than 20 years, Google has helped shape the future of computing with its technology leadership and support across the open source ecosystem,” said Zac Maufe, Director, Financial Services, Google Cloud. “We are thrilled to join FINOS and its community of companies and people dedicated to open source. As the financial services industry accelerates its adoption of cloud technologies, FINOS open source projects will deliver valuable support to both our customers and the financial services tech community at large.”

Société Générale (SocGen), a French multinational investment bank and financial services company, joins FINOS as a Gold member, representing an important addition to the European sell-side representation in FINOS. This comes on the heels of the Linux Foundation amplifying its global focus with the recently announced inaugural European World of Open Source: 2022 Europe Spotlight Survey, a testament to the truly global nature and potential of the open source Community.

“Société Générale implemented an ‘Open Source First’ policy in 2017 and established it’s Open Source Program office (OSPO) in 2020,” said Alain Voiment, CIO for Group digital foundations and corporate functions, Société Générale. “Over the years, our focus has been to evolve in the open source journey by deriving benefits from infrastructure layer to applicative layer to business value add while engaging our developers’ community. As we become a more ‘tech enabled’ company leveraging the power of IT, digital, and data, we continue to foster our innovation capacity in bringing added value for our clients. Collaboration with FINOS is the right step in this direction and there couldn’t be a better time to embark on this journey.”

Our third Gold member, American Express, is dedicated to delivering digital products and services that enhance the lives of their customers, and believe open-source is a key component in supporting innovative growth across the industry. 

“Our technology philosophy focuses on delivering increased scale and efficiency, improved speed to market, high-quality, and security, while always keeping our customer at the center of all we do,” said Hilary Packer, Executive Vice President & Chief Technology Officer, American Express. “We’re excited to join FINOS because of the opportunities it will provide to collaborate with and contribute to the community, while supporting our ongoing adoption of open-source software, standards, and best practices, which in turn will help drive the continued success and growth of our company.”

FINOS also continues to expand the open source technology footprint among buy-side institutions to deliver innovation among the investment and asset management industries. Firms now have the ability to leverage open source connectivity, through projects like FDC3 that bolster interoperability with the sell-side, to access the market quickly in a vendor agnostic fashion. Newest Silver member Point72, a global asset manager which invests in multiple strategies and asset classes, was the first buy-side firm to join FINOS earlier in 2022, signaling their leadership and strong focus on the use of open source in this industry sector.

“Open source has emerged as an increasingly important driver of innovation in leading technology organizations within financial services,” said Mark Brubaker, Chief Technology Officer at Point72. “Our decision to join FINOS reflects our belief that open source collaboration raises all boats, benefiting all organizations and technologists.”

Mirantis, an established open source leader and cloud management platform that helps organizations easily ship code on public and private clouds, also joined FINOS as a Silver member.

“We are proud and excited to join FINOS,” said Andy Wild, Chief Revenue Officer of Mirantis. “With the rapid adoption of Cloud Native Technologies driven by Kubernetes in the financial industry, Mirantis understands that collaboration is the fastest path to innovation, and our open source based products and services have helped to drive innovation and growth for our financial customers for years. Joining FINOS, we look forward to having the opportunity to further align with the needs of the financial industry.”

FINOS also welcomes its latest Associate member, The Digital Dollar Project, a leading private-public partnership advancing the study and exploration of a potential U.S. Central Bank Digital Currency (CBDC), an initiative FINOS recently announced its support for in Davos.

“New advances in financial technology, including CBDCs, have the power to transform economies and connect people, governments, and businesses, locally and globally,” said Jennifer Lassiter, Executive Director of The Digital Dollar Project. “We know that experimentation and information sharing are critical to innovation, which is why we are thrilled to contribute to open source solutions as a new addition to the vibrant FINOS community.”

The addition of new Gold, Silver and Associate members marks continued forward momentum of FINOS’ mission to drive mass open source adoption across all facets of the financial services industry, strengthening its position as the leading organization supporting the industry as they collaborate on vital areas, such as interoperability, data standards, and open source security.

To learn more about joining FINOS as a member, visit the Membership Benefits page. Meet the FINOS team in London on July 13 at its annual Open Source in Finance Forum

About FINOS

FINOS (The Fintech Open Source Foundation) is a nonprofit whose mission is to foster adoption of open source, open standards and collaborative software development practices in financial services. It is the center for open source developers and the financial services industry to build new technology projects that have a lasting impact on business operations. As a regulatory compliant platform, the foundation enables developers from these competing organizations to collaborate on projects with a strong propensity for mutualization. It has enabled codebase contributions from both the buy- and sell-side firms and counts over 50 major financial institutions, fintechs and technology consultancies as part of its membership. FINOS is also part of the Linux Foundation, the largest shared technology organization in the world. Get involved and join FINOS as a Member.

Media Contact:
Catharine Rybeck 
Caliber Corporate Advisers 
catharine@calibercorporateadvisers.com 

SODA Foundation logo - dolphins

Welcomes SoftBank Group to its member ranks

TOKYO, May 25, 2022 – The SODA Foundation, which hosts the SODA Open Data Framework (ODF) for data mobility from edge to core to cloud, today announced two new open source projects: Kahu and Como. Kahu streamlines data protection for Kubernetes and its application data, and Como is a virtual data lake project to enable seamless access to data stored in different clouds. The SODA Foundation also welcomes SoftBank Group as an end-user supporter and key collaboration partner on the Como project.

According to the 2021 SODA Data and Storage Trends Report, two of the top challenges in managing data in containers and cloud-native environments are availability (46%) and management tools (38%).  In direct response to the report findings, the SODA Foundation community collaborated to introduce new tooling options through the Kahu project to improve backup and restore practices critical to data availability.  Furthermore, as enterprises become more data-driven and data growth for some enterprises can exceed 10PB per year, object data management offered by the Como Project will play an important role in performance and scalability requirements for cloud-native environments.

“Data collection, management, and consumption is becoming the new competitive battlefield in IT”, said Steven Tan, chairman, SODA Foundation. “We’re excited to announce Kahu and Como as the latest advances in open source data management and storage. Our 28 members are also excited to welcome the engineers and open source community within SoftBank Group to the Foundation.” 

“Data is the fuel of our global digital economy and harnessing its power requires collaboration on a massive scale”, said Kuniyoshi Suzuki, Senior Director, Cloud Engineering , SoftBank Group.  “Softbank is excited to be joining a community of open source software developers focused on enabling improvements toward data storage, recovery, and retention in cloud environments. We look forward to collaborating with the SODA Foundation and its members, while contributing to the future of this important community.”

New Open Source Releases

In addition to the announcement of Kahu and Como projects, the SODA Foundation also announced the:

  • Release of SODA Framework Madagascar v1.7.0: Formerly Open Data Framework (ODF), SODA Framework comprises independent projects initiated by the community to solve common data and storage problems faced by end users. It includes:
    • Terra: a universal SDS controller for connecting storage to Kubernetes, OpenStack, and VMware environments.
    • Delfin: a performance monitor for heterogeneous storage infrastructure in a single pane of glass.
    • Strato: a multi-cloud data controller using a common S3-compatible interface to connect to cloud storage.
    • Kahu : new project to streamline data protection for Kubernetes and application data.
  • Expansion of its Eco Project Initiative with the introduction of more open source projects: 

DAOS: a software-defined object store designed from the ground up for massively distributed Non Volatile Memory (NVM), providing features such as transactional non-blocking I/O, advanced data protection with self-healing on top of commodity hardware, end-to-end data integrity, fine-grained data control and elastic storage.

YIG: extends Minio backend storage aggregating multiple Ceph clusters to form a massive storage resource pool that can easily scale up to exabyte (EB) levels with minimal performance disruption.

CubeFS: a cloud-native storage platform used as the underlying storage infrastructure for online applications, database or data processing services and machine learning jobs orchestrated by Kubernetes.

Karmada: a Kubernetes management system that enables organizations to run cloud-native applications across multiple Kubernetes clusters and clouds, with no changes to your applications.

SBK: an open source software framework for the performance benchmarking of any storage system.

Conferences and Survey

  • SODACODE: this week, developers from around the world will participate in SODACODE 2022 – the Data & Storage Hackathon on May 25 – 26.  The first-of-its-kind coding event organized by SODA Foundation is open to developers from all levels ranging from beginner to advanced. The hackathon will conclude with project demonstrations, presentation sessions, panel discussions and an award ceremony for the hackathon winners.
  • Trend Survey: The SODA Foundation will release its second-annual Data and Storage Trends Survey on June 30, 2022.
  • SODACON: a technical conference held by SODA Foundation, will be held this year in Yokohama, Japan on December 7, 2022. The conference will bring together industry leaders, developers and end users to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges and solutions in the field of Data and Storage Management in the era of cloud-native, IoT, big data, machine learning, and more.

Additional Resources

  • Join the SODA Foundation
  • Attend SODACODE 2022 – The Data & Storage Hackathon
  • Read the 2021 Data and Storage Trends Report

About the SODA Foundation

Previously OpenSDS, the SODA Foundation is part of the Linux Foundation and includes both open source software and standards to support the increasing need for data autonomy. SODA Foundation Premiere members include China Unicom, Fujitsu, Huawei, NTT Communications and Toyota Motor Corporation. Other members include China Construction Bank Fintech, Click2Cloud, GMO Pepabo, IIJ, MayaData, LinBit, Scality, Sony, Wipro and Yahoo Japan.

Media Contact

info@sodafoundation.io

###

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

Newest release introduces performance and usability improvements, and marks welcome of O3DCon speaker proposals and discussion suggestions due July 15

SAN FRANCISCO, May 13, 2022 – The Open 3D Foundation (O3DF), home of a vibrant, diverse community focused on building a first-class, open source engine for real-time 3D development, has released 22.05, the latest version of the Open 3D Engine, with a focus on performance, stability and usability enhancements. 

With over 1,460 code merges, this new release offers several improvements aiming to make it easier for developers to build 3D simulations for AAA games and various applications across robotics, AI, metaverse, digital twin, automotive, healthcare, and more. Significant advancements include core stability, installer validation, motion matching updates, user-defined property (UDP) support for the asset pipeline, and automated testing advancements. 

Artists can focus on bringing their visions to life using the tools they feel most comfortable with, such as Blender or Autodesk® Maya®. The Open 3D Engine (O3DE) can now integrate user-defined properties (UDP) metadata into its asset pipeline from source assets so that scene-building and asset-processing logic can be customized using this metadata. UDP metadata can be assigned in content creation tools to store custom properties for mesh, light, animation, and other elements to power asset generation workflows for O3DE.

Animation artists can now utilize motion matching, a data-driven animation technique that synthesizes motions based on existing animation data and current character and input contexts to deliver photorealistic experiences. This feature, introduced as an experimental gem, includes a prefabricated character example that can be controlled using a gamepad. 

Other improvements include: 

  • Simpler customization of the render pipeline is now possible using a new set of APIs. Examples of gems that currently exploit this capability include Terrain, LyShine and TressFx. 
  • Developers can now re-use Material Types much more easily.
  • Developers can now control the spawning of player-controlled, networked entities using an improved interface, a capability that is essential for building multiplayer games.
  • Automated tests now verify that an installer build is valid, and ensures that all of the steps within the build are successfully executed. These tests are run nightly for O3DE, and have been designed so that anyone can plug them into their quality verification process. 

The 22.05 Release marks the Open 3D Engine’s first major release of 2022. Releases occur on a bi-annual cadence, in the first half and second half of each year. The next release is scheduled for October 2022, which will coincide with the Open 3D Foundation’s flagship conference, O3DCon.

To learn more about this release and all of its features, read the release notes, or join the community on Discord. You can download the 22.05 Release today. 

O3DCon Call for Proposals Now Open

The Open 3D Foundation also announced the call for proposals (CFPs) for its annual flagship conference, O3DCon. On October 18-19, 2022, in Austin, Texas, technology leaders, independent 3D developers, and the academic community spanning the 3D landscape will come together to share ideas, discuss hot topics and help shape the future of open 3D development across a variety of industries and disciplines. O3DCon will be presented as a hybrid event—attendees can join and participate in person or virtually. Workshops and pre-registration will be held on October 17, a day ahead of the actual conference events.

With over 25 member companies since its public announcement in July 2021, the Open 3D Foundation boasts a healthy, thriving community, adding Microsoft as its latest member. Other premier members include Adobe, AWS, Huawei, Intel and Niantic. The O3D Engine averages up to 2 million line changes and 350-450 commits monthly from 60-100 authors across 41 repos.

“I’m proud of the O3DE community’s focus on core stability while delivering new capabilities aimed to simplify and enhance 3D development for developers around the globe,” said Royal O’Brien, Executive Director of O3DF and General Manager of Games and Digital Media at the Linux Foundation. “I’m also incredibly excited about the opportunity O3DCon offers in bringing together diverse minds to collaborate on advancing the state of open 3D development across so many industries.”

Proposals to speak at O3DCon are being accepted now through Friday, July 15, 2022, at 11:59 pm PDT. All those interested are invited to submit proposals. Those who have submitted proposals will be notified of a decision by Tuesday, August 2. Learn more and submit your proposal today.

Submission types requested include:

  • Lightning talks
  • Session presentations
  • Birds-of-a-feather discussions
  • Panel discussions
  • Hands-on workshops/training

Suggested topics include:

  • 3D Development & Open 3D Engine 101
  • Building & Sustaining Open Source in 3D Development
  • Game Development
  • Metaverse
  • AI
  • Robotics
  • Digital Twin
  • Automotive
  • Healthcare

Sponsors have the unique opportunity to demonstrate their leadership in this burgeoning arena, forge valuable connections and help shape the future of 3D development. O3DCon offers multiple sponsorship levels for your consideration. To explore all of the sponsorship benefits, please click here. The sponsorship deadline is September 2, 2022. O3DF Members receive a 3% discount on all exhibitor packages. For questions about sponsorships and contract requests, or to become a sponsor, please contact us

Visit the O3DF website and follow O3DE on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn for all the latest O3DCon updates and announcements.

About the Open 3D Engine Project

Open 3D Engine (O3DE) is the flagship project managed by the Open 3D Foundation (O3DF). The open source project is a modular, cross-platform 3D engine built to power anything from AAA games to cinema-quality 3D worlds to high-fidelity simulations. The code is hosted on GitHub under the Apache 2.0 license. To learn more, please visit o3de.org. To get involved and connect with the O3DE community, please join us on Discord and GitHub.

About the Open 3D Foundation

Established in July 2021, the mission of the Open 3D Foundation (O3DF) is to make an open-source, fully-featured, high-fidelity, real-time 3D engine for building games and simulations, available to every industry. The Open 3D Foundation is home to the O3D Engine project. To learn more, please visit o3d.foundation.

About the Linux Foundation

Founded in 2000, the Linux Foundation is supported by more than 1,000 members and is the world’s leading home for collaboration on open source software, open standards, open data, and open hardware. Linux Foundation’s projects are critical to the world’s infrastructure including Linux, Kubernetes, Node.js, and more. The Linux Foundation’s methodology focuses on leveraging best practices and addressing the needs of contributors, users and solution providers to create sustainable models for open collaboration. For more information, please visit us at linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation Events are where the world’s leading technologists meet, collaborate, learn and network in order to advance innovations that support the world’s largest shared technologies.

Media Inquiries:

pr@o3d.foundation

SAN FRANCISCO, April 21, 2022 The Open Mainframe Project, an open source initiative that enables collaboration across the mainframe community to develop shared tool sets and resources, today announced the launch of the Call for Proposals (CFPs) for the 3rd annual Open Mainframe Summit. The premier mainframe event of 2022, the Summit will take place in person on September 21-22 at Convene at Commerce Square in Philadelphia, PA.

“We are excited to host Open Mainframe Summit in person this year,” said John Mertic, Director of Program Management at the Linux Foundation. “The last two events were successful in that we enabled our messages to reach more users around the world. We hope to continue that momentum while also giving our community a safe place to engage and collaborate face-to-face.”

Open Mainframe Summit is open to students, developers, users and contributors of projects from around the globe looking to learn, network and collaborate. It will feature content tracks that tackle both business and technical strategies for enterprise development and deployment.

Submit a Proposal

The Call for Proposals is now open and will be accepting submissions until Friday, June 10, 2022. Interested speakers can submit proposals in 10 tracks with options for lightning talks, 30-minute sessions and panel discussions. Tracks include:

  • AI & Machine Learning
    • From open source projects with a focus on AI, Machine Learning, and Data Analytics that currently run on Z to the AI accelerator on the recently announced IBM Telum processor, the mainframe will continue to be a key component of how organizations process their data. This track will look at projects, tools, and strategies currently used by organizations tackling these topics today.
  • Building the Next Workforce
    • Building the next workforce in today’s evolving mainframe and post-COVID environment can be challenging. This track will provide strategies for helping onboard newcomers to the platform to learn from the veterans as well as detailed opportunities for the veterans to learn tooling from the newcomers that can now be leveraged for mainframe!
  • Business
  • Cloud Native on the Mainframe + Hybrid Cloud
    • Explore the solutions for and benefits of integrating  mainframe into your hybrid cloud environment. Topics range from incorporating mainframe into enterprise DevOps pipelines and enabling the use of popular distributed tooling such as VS Code to running containers directly on z/OS.
  • Diversity + Inclusion
  • Education + Training
    • Discover opportunities to add more tools to your tech toolkit! Whether you are just getting started with mainframe or you are an experienced veteran, there are programs to expand your skill set & to also share your knowledge with others.
  • Languages
    • The mainframe supports a variety of programming languages, both on z/OS and Linux. This track will showcase some of the latest technical updates, usage statistics, and more from several of them.
  • Linux on Z
  • Open Source Security on Mainframe
    • From security scans performed in the course of software development to security scans and audits that can be done within an organization to make sure all software is in compliance, this track will focus on what software vendors and open source software projects are doing to ensure that software being provided on the mainframe is secure.
  • z/OS

Submit a proposal: https://events.linuxfoundation.org/open-mainframe-summit/program/cfp/.

Meet the Program Committee

A program committee, which includes maintainers, active community members and project leaders, will review and rate the proposals once all the submissions are in. This year, Open Mainframe Project welcomes Alan Clark, CTO Office and Director for Industry Initiatives, Emerging Standards and Open Source at SUSE, Donna Hudi, Chief Marketing Officer at Phoenix Software, Elizabeth K. Joseph, Developer Advocate at IBM and Michael Bauer, Staff Product Owner at Broadcom, Inc.

Whether a company is a member or contributor of Open Mainframe Project or is sponsoring the event has no impact on whether talks from their developers will be selected. However, being a community leader does have an impact, as program committee members will often rate talks from the creators or leaders of an open source project more highly. A key focus will be on work within Open Mainframe Project’s 21 hosted projects/working groups, or contributions that otherwise add value to the ecosystem.

Early Bird pricing of $500 for general admission or $40 for academic attendees will end July 8. Click here to register.

Sponsor Now

Open Mainframe Summit is made possible with support from sponsors, especially our first Gold Sponsor Vicom Infinity, a Converge Company. To become a sponsor, click here.

For more details about Open Mainframe or to watch the videos for Open Mainframe Summit 2021, check out the Open Mainframe Project 2021 Annual Report.

For more about Open Mainframe Project, visit https://www.openmainframeproject.org/

About the Open Mainframe Project

The Open Mainframe Project is intended to serve as a focal point for deployment and use of Linux and Open Source in a mainframe computing environment. With a vision of Open Source on the Mainframe as the standard for enterprise class systems and applications, the project’s mission is to build community and adoption of Open Source on the mainframe by eliminating barriers to Open Source adoption on the mainframe, demonstrating value of the mainframe on technical and business levels, and strengthening collaboration points and resources for the community to thrive. Learn more about the project at https://www.openmainframeproject.org.

About The Linux Foundation

The Linux Foundation is the organization of choice for the world’s top developers and companies to build ecosystems that accelerate open technology development and commercial adoption. Together with the worldwide open source community, it is solving the hardest technology problems by creating the largest shared technology investment in history. Founded in 2000, The Linux Foundation today provides tools, training and events to scale any open source project, which together deliver an economic impact not achievable by any one company. More information can be found at www.linuxfoundation.org.

The Linux Foundation has registered trademarks and uses trademarks. For a list of trademarks of The Linux Foundation, please see its trademark usage page: www.linuxfoundation.org/trademark-usage. Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.

###

I am old enough to remember when organizations developed software in-house – all of it. I also clearly remember my information systems college professor teaching it is almost always less expensive and better to use code/programs already written and adapting them for your use than to recreate the wheel from scratch. 

It is a different world now – software is built on a foundation of other programs, libraries, and code bases. Free and open source software (FOSS) is key to this because it is so easy to pickup, use, share, and create code. What an opportunity to speed development and focus innovation on the next thing rather than creating what already exists. This is part of the value of open source software – collaborate on the building blocks and innovate and differentiate on top of that. 

However, there are also challenges in this space, with a good example being the question of how to address licensing. There are A LOT of types of licenses that can apply to a piece of software/code. Each license needs to be understood and tracked with each piece of software it is included in for an organization to ensure nothing is missed. This can quickly multiply into a significant catalog that requires lots of manual work. On top of that, you also need to provide that license information to each of your customers, and they will have their own system and/or processes for providing that information to them and making sure it is up-to-date with each new version of the software. 

You can see where this can quickly consume valuable staff resources and open doors to mistakes. Imagine the possibility of a standard way to track and report the licenses so your teams don’t need to worry about all of the digital paperwork and can instead focus on innovation and adding value to you and your customers.

This is exactly the problem a team of lawyers and governance experts sought to fix back in 2016 and created the OpenChain Project to do just that. They asked, what are the key things for open source compliance that everyone needs, and how do we unify the systems and processes. They envisioned an internationally accepted standard to track and report all of the licenses applicable to a software project. The end result is a more trustable supply chain where organizations don’t need to spend tons of time checking compliance again and again and then remediating. 

The result – a ISO standard  (ISO/IEC 5230) was approved in Q4 2020. The OpenChain Project also hosts a library of 1,000 different reference documents in a wide variety of languages – some are official and many more are community documents, like workflow examples, FAQs, etc.

How are organizations benefiting from OpenChain? I find it encouraging that Toyota is one of the leaders in this. As anyone who has had at least one business class in college knows, Toyota is a leader in innovations for manufacturing over several decades. In the 1970s they pioneered supply chain management techniques with the Toyota Production System (please tell me they had to do TPS reports) – adopted externally as Just in Time manufacturing. They are also known for adopting the philosophy of Kaizen, or continuous improvement. So, as they looked at how to manage software supply chains and all of the licensing, they adopted the OpenChain Specification. They implemented it, in part, with a governance structure and an official group to manage OSS risks and community contributions.


Toyota’s OSS governance structure

diagram of toyota's open source software governance structure - OSS Developer; Security Specialist; IP Specialist over R&D over Developing OSS Culture and Handling OSS Risks

They are also an active participant in the OpenChain Japan Working Group to help identify bottlenecks across the supply chain, and the group enabled Toyota to develop information sharing guidelines to address licensing challenges with Tier 1 suppliers. They now see reduced bottlenecks, more data for better decision making, and decreased patent and licensing risks. Read more.

PwC is a global auditing, assurance, tax, and consulting firm. As an auditor, much of their business revolves around building trust in society. They also develop software solutions for thousands of clients around the world and receive software from providers of all sizes and maturity levels, making OSS compliance difficult. It was a tremendous effort and caused time delays for them and their clients. Now, PwC is able to provide clients with an Open Source Software compliance assessment based on the latest OpenChain specification. Their clients can share an internationally-recognized PwC audit report to verify OSS compliance. Read more.

And just last month, SAP, a market leader in enterprise application software, announced they are adopting the OpenChain ISO/IEC 5230 standard. It marks the first time that an enterprise application software company has undergone a whole entity conformance. Their reach across the global supply chain is massive – its customers are involved in almost 90% of global trade.

As the ISO/IEC standard is done, what is next for OpenChain? They are looking at security, export control, and more. 

If you or your organization are interested in learning more about OpenChain, adopting the standard, or getting involved in what is next, head over to https://www.openchainproject.org/. We also host an online training course when you are ready to dig in: Introduction to Open Source License Compliance Management

My hope is that you now spend less time on compliance and more time on innovation.